Faculty Podcast

Gender, Law, and the British Novel: The Nature of Law

This panel was recorded May 15, 2010, as part of the conference "Gender, Law, and the British Novel," organized by Martha Nussbaum, Alison LaCroix, and Jane Dailey. Participants included:

136:14 minutes (124.72 MB)

Panel: "China, the WTO, and International Economic Law"

This panel was recorded April 6, 2011, as part of the China and International Law Symposium sponsored by the Confucius Institute and the University of Chicago Law School.

100:59 minutes (92.46 MB)

Hendrik Hartog, "Quantum Meruit and Old Age Care in American Family Life"

This Fulton Lecture in Legal History, recorded May 5, 2011, draws from Professor Hartog's forthcoming book, Someday All This Will Be Yours: A History of Inheritance and Old Age. It uses transcripts from a series of late nineteenth and early twentieth century New Jersey cases to explore the problem of who should be paid for household work and for intimate caretaking.

92:17 minutes (84.49 MB)

Joshua Cohen, "Democracy v. Citizens United?"

The 2011 Dewey Lecture in Law and Philosophy entitled "Democracy v. Citizens United?," was presented on April 20, 2011, by Joshua Cohen, the Marta Sutton Weeks Professor of Ethics in Society and Professor of Political Science, Philosophy, and Law at Stanford University.

104:17 minutes (95.48 MB)

Alison Siegler and Daniel Rosengard '11, “Special Considerations in Representing the Non-Citizen Client"

This is a recording of a training seminar presented by the Federal Criminal Justice Project for federal criminal defense attorneys entitled “A Comprehensive Overview of Immigration Considerations and Consequences From Bond Through Sentencing and Beyond.” Approximately 60 federal defenders and Criminal Justice Act Panel attorneys attended the seminar, which was held on May 5, 2011, at the office

74:45 minutes (68.44 MB)

"The Rise and Fall of Judicial Self-Restraint" with Judge Richard Posner

Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit will deliver a lecture on the history of the theory of judicial self-restraint as articulated primarily by Thayer, Holmes, Brandeis, Frankfurter, and Bickel (the "Thayerians").

82:58 minutes (75.97 MB)

Convocation 2011: Hooding Ceremony

Remarks from the Law School's 2011 Hooding Ceremony on June 11, 2011. Speakers included Dean Michael Schill, Debra Cafaro, '82 (recipient of the Distinguished Alumna Award), and Professor Douglas Baird.

30:42 minutes (28.12 MB)

Richard Epstein, "Clinical Trials on Trial: How Should the FDA Do Its Job?"

One of the major functions of the FDA is to check new drugs for their safety and effectiveness. The chief tool for doing this has been the double-blind clinical trial.

64:18 minutes (58.88 MB)

Adam Samaha, "Tiebreakers"

What is a tiebreaker? Are some tiebreakers better than others? Does law have tiebreakers? Are ties so terrible that we need to break them? In this CBI, Professor Samaha offers answers to these questions. Using various examples from life and law, he will explain how tiebreakers can be thought of as a peculiar sort of lexically inferior decision rule.

61:44 minutes (56.52 MB)

Eric Posner, "Obama and the Imperial Presidency"

Commentators criticized the Bush administration for expanding presidential powers, but the Obama administration has not tried to curtail them, nor has Congress or the courts.  In this talk, Professor Posner will trace the evolution of the imperial presidency, and explain why the powerful executive has become entrenched in the U.S. system of government.

54:51 minutes (50.23 MB)
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