Faculty Podcast

Karl Llewellyn: "Marriage and Family" Classroom Lecture

Karl Llewellyn taught at the University of Chicago Law School from 1951 until his death in 1962. In this undated classroom recording, he takes an often light-hearted look at the implicit legal structures within what was at the time considered the "typical" American family.

102:39 minutes (93.98 MB)

Adam Samaha: "Muskets and Glocks: The Second Amendment Reborn?"

Adam Samaha is Assistant Professor of Law and Herbert and Marjorie Fried Teaching Scholar at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded as part of the Law School's annual Loop Luncheon series on May 5, 2008.

47:42 minutes (43.67 MB)

Gerhard Casper: "Forswearing Allegiance"

Gerhard Casper is President Emeritus, Stanford University, and former Dean of the University of Chicago Law School. This lecture, the 2008 Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lecture in Legal History, was recorded May 1, 2008. Prof. Casper was introduced by Dean Saul Levmore.

66:42 minutes (61.08 MB)

Cass Sunstein and Richard Epstein: "Should Conservatives Vote for Obama?"

This debate between University of Chicago Law School professors Cass Sunstein and Richard Epstein was recorded on March 3, 2008, and was cosponsored by the Federalist Society and the Black Law Students Association.

63:02 minutes (57.71 MB)

M. Todd Henderson: "Predicting Crime (without the Pre-Cogs)"

In the absence of pre-cognitive superbeings and Tom Cruise, how are police and policy makers supposed to allocate scarce crime-fighting resources? There is a vibrant academic literature on predicting crime, with models of various types offered as the best way of estimating future crime rates.

67:21 minutes (61.66 MB)

Geoffrey Stone: "The World of the Framers: A Christian Nation?"

It has become commonplace in American political discourse for Christian evangelicals to assert that the United States was founded as a "Christian nation" and that in recent decades secularists have gained control and distorted our nation's founding traditions and values. In this lecture, Professor Geoffrey Stone examines the beliefs of the Framers on this question.

62:17 minutes (57.03 MB)

Tom Ginsburg: “Why China Allows its Citizens to Sue the Government: Administrative Litigation in China”

Tom Ginsburg is Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded on May 6, 2008 and was sponsored by the China Law Society.

46:35 minutes (42.66 MB)

Richard Epstein: "Is the Administrative State Consistent with the Rule of Law?"

Without question, the most distinctive feature of the modern social democratic state is the rise of administrative agencies, which at the federal level function as a shadowy Fourth Branch of government that fits uneasily into our constitutional scheme of separation of powers, and which at the state level oversee vast swaths of economic activity.

60:48 minutes (55.67 MB)

Martha Nussbaum: "Equal Respect for Conscience: The Roots of a Moral and Legal Tradition"

This talk was presented as the University of Chicago's 2008 Nora and Edward Ryerson Lecture. The Ryerson Lectures grew out of a 1972 bequest to the University by Nora and Edward L. Ryerson, a former Chairman of the Board. The University's faculty selects each Ryerson Lecturer based on a consensus that a particular scholar has made research contributions of lasting significance.

80:53 minutes (92.56 MB)

Abner Mikva and Jason Huber: "Against All Odds: Litigating Federal Criminal Appeals in the Seventh Circuit"

Judge Abner Mikva and Jason Huber of the Appellate Advocacy Clinic at the University of Chicago's Edwin F. Mandel Legal Aid Clinic discuss the work and history of the Appellate Advocacy project.

14:36 minutes (13.37 MB)
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