Faculty Podcast

Alison LaCroix, "The Shadow Powers of Article I"

The Supreme Court's federalism battleground has recently shifted from the Commerce Clause to two textually marginal but substantively important domains: the Necessary and Proper Clause and, to a lesser extent, the General Welfare Clause. For nearly a decade, these quieter, more structurally ambiguous federal powers – the “shadow powers” – have steadily increased in prominence.

Participating faculty: 
Alison LaCroix

William Baude, "Is Originalism Our Law?"

At her confirmation hearing, Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan said that "we are all originalists." Is that true, and what would it mean for it to be true? In Is Originalism Our Law?, I argue that there is an important sense in which Justice Kagan was right.

Participating faculty: 
William Baude

Panel: "Ferguson and Beyond: Criminal Procedure and Police Killings"

This panel was moderated by Professor Siegler and included Deputy Dean Ginsburg and Professors Huq, McAdams, and Randolph Stone.

The event took place on February 4, 2015. It was presented by BLSA in partnership with the Law School and cosponsored by ACS, APALSA, Criminal Law Society, Defenders, Human Rights Law Society, LLSA, LSRJ, LWC, PILS, and SALSA.

Participating faculty: 
Alison Siegler
Participating faculty: 
Tom Ginsburg
Participating faculty: 
Aziz Huq
Participating faculty: 
Richard H. McAdams
Participating faculty: 
Randolph N. Stone

A Conversation With Elena Kagan

In a conversation with David A. Strauss, Gerald Ratner Distinguished Service Professor of Law, US Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan reflects on decision-making, persuasion, and hunting with Scalia.

This event took place on February 2, 2015, at the University of Chicago Law School.

Participating faculty: 
David A. Strauss
Participating faculty: 
Michael H. Schill

Panel: “Will the Supreme Court Make Disparate Impact Disappear?”

A panel discussion with John Relman, Jeff Leslie, Lee Fennell, and Tara Ramchandani

As part of the Law School's Diversity Month, the panelists discuss the pending Supreme Court Case, "Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project."

Participating faculty: 
Jeff Leslie
Participating faculty: 
Lee Fennell

Martha Minow, "Forgiveness, Law and Justice"

Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School,with comments by Martha Nussbaum, Aziz Huq, and Michael Schill.

Participating faculty: 
Martha Nussbaum
Participating faculty: 
Aziz Huq

Richard McAdams, "How Law Works Expressively"

Although people sometimes violate the law, there is more legal compliance than we can explain by ordinary economic theory – that legal sanctions deter noncompliance. In some domains of international law and constitutional law, there is no credible threat of legal sanctions, yet there is compliance.

Participating faculty: 
Richard H. McAdams
Related article: 
Why Do People Obey the Law?

Baude, Harel, & McAdams, "How Should We Interpret our Constitutions?"

How Should We Interpret our Constitutions? 

A Debate between Professors Baude and Harel

Moderated by Professor McAdams

Participating faculty: 
William Baude
Participating faculty: 
Alon Harel
Participating faculty: 
Richard H. McAdams

Adam Chilton, "Why We Know Very Little About the Effectiveness of International Law, and How Experiments Might Help to Change That"

While scholars in most fields argue about how laws can be changed to maximize their effectiveness, scholars of international law still regularly debate whether many of the most prominent international agreements have any effect on state behavior.

Participating faculty: 
Adam Chilton

Richard Posner, Empirical Legal Studies Conference keynote

Richard A. Posner, Senior Lecturer in Law and a judge on the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, devoted a lunchtime keynote to discussing how judges might receive and view empirical research.

Participating faculty: 
Richard A. Posner