Center for Law, Philosophy, and Human Values

Conference: Skepticism about Freedom and Responsibility

Date: 
04.11.2014 - 04.12.2014

Attendance at this conference is by invitation only. Program and papers listed below are password protected.  For additional information, contact Professor Brian Leiter at bleiter@uchicago.edu

Don Loeb, “Moral Disagreement Revisited”

Organized by Professor Brian Leiter, Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence, a conference on "Moral Disagreements" was held on March 30-31, 2012.


118:07 minutes (108.14 MB)

Sharon Street, "How to Be a Relativist about Normativity"

Organized by Professor Brian Leiter, Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence, a conference on "Moral Disagreements" was held on March 30-31, 2012.


131:52 minutes (120.74 MB)

David Enoch, "A Defense of Moral Deference"

Organized by Professor Brian Leiter, Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence, a conference on "Moral Disagreements" was held on March 30-31, 2012.


123:14 minutes (112.83 MB)

Center for Law, Philosophy, and Human Values presents Veronica Rodriguez-Blanco, “Legal Authority and the Paradox of Intention in Action”

Date: 
04.23.2012

Veronica Rodriguez-Blanco (Law, University of Birmingham):  “Legal Authority and the Paradox of Intention in Action.”  With commentary by Candace Vogler, Chair of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Chicago.

Conference on “Moral Disagreements”

Date: 
03.30.2012 - 03.31.2012

Speakers:  David Enoch (Law & Philosophy, Hebrew University, Jersualem); Don Loeb (Philosophy, University of Vermont); Peter Ludlow (Philosophy, Northwestern University); David Plunkett (Law & Philosophy, University of California, Los Angeles); Sharon Street (Philosophy, New York University).  Commentary will be provided by JD/PhD students at the University of Chicago.

Brian Leiter Recommends Readings on Nietzsche

Brian Leiter on Nietzsche
David Wolf
The Browser
September 19, 2011

Nietzsche is one of your philosophical specialities. So how did you first become interested in him?

It was a very precise moment. Easter Sunday 1982. I think it’s deliciously ironic that it was Easter Sunday. As an undergraduate I was taking a course called “Kant to 1900” with Richard Rorty at Princeton University, and the course included a couple of weeks on Nietzsche.

Faculty: 
Brian Leiter