WSJ Discusses Randy Picker's Razors and Blades Paper

Razors and Blades
Phil Izzo
The Wall Street Journal
September 16, 2010

–Razors and Blades: Randal C. Picker writes about the practice of investing in an installed base with cheap prices for products like razors and then making profit on replaceable parts like blades, finding that in one case at least it’s a myth. ” The actual facts of the dawn of the disposable razor blades market are quite confounding. Gillette’s 1904 patents gave it the power to block entry into the installed base of handles that it would create. While other firms could and did enter the multi-blade market with their own handles and blades, no one could produce Gillette handles or blades during the life of the patents. From 1904-1921, Gillette could have played razors-and-blades - low-price or free handles and expensive blades - but it did not do so. Gillette set a high price for its handle - high as measured by the price of competing razors and the prices of other contemporaneous goods - and fought to maintain those high prices during the life of the patents. For whatever it is worth, the firm understood to have invented razors-and-blades as a business strategy did not play that strategy at the point that it was best situated to do so. It was at the point of the expiration of the 1904 patents that Gillette started to play something like razors-and-blades, though the actual facts are much more interesting than that. Before the expiration of the 1904 patents, the multi-blade market was segmented, with Gillette occupying the high end with razor sets listing at $5.00 and other brands such as Ever-Ready and Gem Junior occupying the low-end with sets listing at $1.00.”

Read the abstract at SSRN or download the paper from our website.

Faculty: 
Randal C. Picker