Meet the University of Chicago Law School Law and Economics Faculty

We introduced you to five brilliant additions to the law and economics faculty. Now meet the twenty-nine stellar scholars they'll be joining.

DANIEL ABEBE is Assistant Professor of Law. He earned his JD from Harvard Law School in 2000. After law school, he clerked for Judge Damon J. Keith of the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and later worked as a corporate associate at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP in New York City. Abebe earned an MA in political science from the University of Chicago in 2006. He taught at the Law School as a Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Law before joining the faculty in 2008. Abebe’s teaching and research interests include public international law, foreign relations law, international organizations, and international relations theory. Recent publications include “International Agreements, Internal Heterogeneity, and Climate Change: The ‘Two Chinas’ Problem,” with Jonathan Masur, Virginia Journal of International Law, 2010; and “Great Power Politics and the Structure of Foreign Relations Law,” Chicago Journal of International Law, 2009. He is working on a project on international law and state heterogeneity.

DOUGLAS G. BAIRD, Harry A. Bigelow Distinguished Service Professor of Law, concentrates his research on corporate reorganizations. He received the Class of 2007 award, which recognizes a member of the faculty of staff who made a substantial contribution to improving thequality of student life and who enriched the spirit of community within the Law School. All graduating students participate in the selection through a balloting process. His work has changed the way scholars, judges, and lawyers look at bankruptcy law. Baird’s other research interests include intellectual property and contract law. Recent articles include “Present at the Creation: The SEC and the Origins of the Absolute Priority Rule,” American Bankruptcy Law Journal, 2010; and “Antibankruptcy,” Yale Law Journal, 2010. Baird is a former Dean of the Law School.

OMRI BEN-SHAHAR is the Frank and Bernice J. Greenberg Professor of Law and the Kearney Director of the University of Chicago Institute for Law and Economics. He earned his PhD in economics and SJD from Harvard and his BA and LLB from the Hebrew University. Before coming to Chicago, he was the Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law and Economics at the University of Michigan. Prior to that he taught at Tel Aviv University, was a member of Israel’s Antitrust Court, and clerked at the Supreme Court of Israel. He teaches Contracts, Sales, Insurance Law, E-Commerce, Law and Economics, and Game Theory and the Law. He writes in the fields of contract law and products liability. Recent publications include “Damages for Unlicensed Use,” University of Chicago Law Review, 2011; “Fixing Unfair Contracts,” Stanford Law Review, 2011; and “Consumer Protection without Law,” Regulation, 2010.

LISA BERNSTEIN, Wilson-Dickinson Professor of Law, focuses on private commercial law. The goal of her research is to better understand merchant reality to improve public commercial law and adjudicative procedure. She is working on projects relating to firm structure and the Uniform Commercial Code as well as a study of how the content of merchant customs is, in fact, proved in court. Bernstein has organized numerous conferences on topics ranging from corporate law to Internet governance. She has served as chair of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Law and Social Sciences section and the AALS Law and Economics Section, has been a member of the board of the American Law and Economics Association, and is an advisory board member for the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) journal Law, Norms & Informal Order.

ANU BRADFORD, an Assistant Professor of Law, joined the faculty in 2008. She earned her SJD and LLM degrees from Harvard Law School. She also holds a law degree from the University of Helsinki. Her primary research interests are international trade law and international political economy, international antitrust law, and European Union law. Recent publications include “Universal Exceptionalism in International Law,” with Eric Posner, Harvard International Law Journal, 2011; and “When the WTO Works, and How It Fails,” Virginia Journal of International Law, 2010. Her current work focuses on the shift in the balance of economic power and its impact in the negotiation and enforcement of international trade agreements.

ANTHONY CASEY, an Assistant Professor of Law, graduated from Georgetown University in 1999 magna cum laude with an AB in economics and government and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He received his JD from the Law School with high honors in 2002. He was the recipient of the John M. Olin Prize and a member of the Law Review and the Order of the Coif. Casey clerked for then–Chief Judge Joel M. Flaum of the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, then practiced corporate litigation at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York and Kirkland & Ellis in Chicago. He became a partner at Kirkland & Ellis in 2008. Before joining the faculty in 2011, Casey taught at the Law School as a Bigelow Fellow and Lecturer in Law. Casey’s research and teaching interests include corporations, corporate bankruptcy and reorganization, finance, securities regulation, and law and economics.

RONALD H. COASE is the Clifton R. Musser Professor Emeritus of Economics at the Law School. Coase’s 1937 paper, “The Nature of the Firm,” established the field of transaction cost economics. “The Problem of Social Cost,” published in 1961, set out what is now known as the Coase Theorem and a new field in economic research, law and economics. Coase was awarded the Alfred Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1991. In 2003, Coase was the winner of the Economist’s Innovation Award in the category of “No Boundaries.” Coase’s current work continues to look into the complicated natureof the firm. His book How China Became Capitalist, with Ning Wang, is scheduled to be published by Palgrave in 2011. He is also continuing his research into the structure of production, producers’ expectations, and natural monopolies. In the summer of 2010 he organized a weeklong conference on theindustrial structure of production, focusing on China.

KENNETH W. DAM is Max Pam Professor Emeritus of American and Foreign Law and Senior Lecturer in Law. Dam devotes his academic energies to applying law and economics principles to international issues. His most recent book, The Law-Growth Nexus: The Rule of Law and Economic Development, was published in 2006. He is now engaged in research involving the difficulties European countries are experiencing carrying out economic reform measures. He is also working on international finance issues and teaches a special class on that subject. He has spent much of his career in public life, including service as Deputy Secretary in the departments of State and the Treasury and as executive director of the Council on Economic Policy. He has written several books dealing with such issues as international trade and international monetary reform.

FRANK EASTERBROOK, Senior Lecturer in Law and a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, graduated from the Law School in 1973. He was an editor of the Law Review and a member of the Order of the Coif. Before coming to Chicago, he attended Swarthmore College, from which he received a degree in 1970 with high honors. Judge Easterbrook was a law clerk to Levin H. Campbell of the US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. He then joined the solicitor general’s office, where he served first as assistant to the solicitor general and later as deputy solicitor general of the United States. He returned to the Law School in 1979. Before becoming a judge in 1985, Judge Easterbrook was Lee and Brena Freeman Professor of Law. Judge Easterbrook is interested in antitrust law, criminal law and procedure, and other subjects involving implicit or explicit markets. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1992. Between 1982 and 1991 he was an editor of the Journal of Law and Economics. He has written (with Daniel R. Fischel) The Economic Structure of Corporate Law (1991) and has published numerous articles, several of them scholarly.

RICHARD A. EPSTEIN is the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Law and a Senior Lecturer in Law. Epstein’s recent work has included projects on American constitutional law, federal preemption, the history of antitrust consent decrees, the law and economics of the pharmaceutical industry, behavioral economics, property theory, takings, organ transplantation, obesity, the history of the Progressive Era, and intellectual property, as well as short articles and op eds on a range of subjects. His most recent book, The Case against the Employee Free Choice Act, was published by the Hoover Press in 2009. Recent articles include “Do Accounting Rules Matter? The Dangerous Allure of Mark to Market,” with M. Todd Henderson, Journal of Corporation Law, 2011; “Of Pleading and Discovery: Reflections on Twombly and Iqbal with Special Reference to Antitrust,” University of Illinois Law Review, 2011; and “Heller’s Gridlock Economy in Perspective: Why There Is Too Little, Not Too Much, Private Property,” Arizona Law Review, 2011.

LEE FENNELL, Max Pam Professor of Law, joined the University of Chicago Law School faculty in 2007. She previously taught at the University of Illinois College of Law and the University of Texas School of Law. Her research and teaching interests include property, torts, land use, housing, social welfare law, state and local government law, and public finance. Her book, The Unbounded Home: Property Values beyond Property Lines, was published by Yale University Press in 2009. Other recent publications include “Ostrom’s Law: Property Rights in the Commons,” International Journal of the Commons, 2011; “Commons, Anticommons, Semicommons,” in Research Handbook on the Economics of Property Law, edited by Henry E. Smith and Kenneth Ayotte, 2011; and “Unbundling Risk,” Duke Law Journal, 2011.

DAN FISCHEL is Lee and Brena Freeman Professor Emeritus of Law and Business and Senior Lecturer in Law. He received his JD cum laude from the Law School in 1977. He was Comment Editor of the Law Review and was elected to the Order of the Coif. Following his graduation, he clerked for Thomas E. Fairchild, chief judge of the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, and then for Justice Potter Stewart of the US Supreme Court. In 1980, he became a professor of law at the Northwestern University School of Law. After serving as a visiting professor at the Law School during the 1982–1983 academic year, he joined the faculty permanently in January 1984 and served as Dean 1999–2001. Fischel graduated from Cornell University in 1972 and received his MA in American history from Brown University in 1974. His chief interests include corporations, corporate finance, and the regulation of financial markets. He is the author of numerous articles in these fields.

TOM GINSBURG joined the University of Chicago faculty in 2008 and became the Leo Spitz Professor of International Law and Professor of Political Science in 2011. His focus is on comparative and international law from an interdisciplinary perspective. He holds BA, JD, and PhD degrees from the University of California at Berkeley. He currently codirects the Comparative Constitutions Project, an effort funded by the National Science Foundation to gather and analyze the constitutions of all independent nation-states since 1789. His book with Francisco Parisi and Guy Seidman, Comparative Legal Institutions, will be published by Aspen in 2011. Recent articles include “The Arbitrator as Agent: Why Deferential Review Is Not Always Pro-Arbitration,” University of Chicago Law Review, 2010; and “National Courts, Domestic Democracy, and the Evolution of International Law: A Reply to Eyal Benvenisti and George Downs,” European Journal of International Law, 2010.

M. TODD HENDERSON, Professor of Law, received an engineering degree cum laude from Princeton University in 1993. He worked for several years designing and building dams in California before matriculating at the Law School. He graduated magna cum laude in 1998, served as an editor of the Law Review, and was elected to the Order of the Coif. Following law school, Henderson served as clerk to the Honorable Dennis Jacobs of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, practiced appellate litigation at Kirkland & Ellis in Washington, D.C., and was an engagement manager at McKinsey & Company in Boston. His research interests include corporations, securities regulation, bankruptcy, law and economics, and intellectual property. He researches corporate governance and the regulation of financial innovations, such as hedge funds and credit derivatives. Recent publications include “Insider Trading and CEO Pay,” Vanderbilt Law Review, 2011; “Do Accounting Rules Matter? The Dangerous Allure of Mark to Market,” with Richard  Epstein, Journal of Corporation Law, 2011; and “Predicting Crime,” Arizona Law Review, 2010.

WILLIAM H. J. HUBBARD, an Assistant Professor of Law, received his JD with high honors in 2000 from the Law School, where he was Executive Editor of the Law Review. He clerked for the Honorable Patrick E. Higginbotham of the US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. From 2001 to 2006, he practiced law as a litigation associate at Mayer Brown LLP in Chicago, where he specialized in commercial litigation, electronic discovery, and appellate practice. During 2006–2011, he completed the PhD program in economics at the University of Chicago. Before joining the faculty in 2011, he was a Kauffman Legal Research Fellow and Lecturer in Law at the Law School. Mr. Hubbard’s current research primarily involves economic analysis of litigation, courts, and civil procedure. Other research interests include family, education, and labor economics. Recent publications include “The Phantom Gender Difference in the College Wage Premium,” Journal of Human Resources, 2011; and “Explaining the Worldwide Boom in Higher Education of Women,” with Gary S. Becker and Kevin M. Murphy, Journal of Human Capital, 2010.

WILLIAM M. LANDES is Clifton R. Musser Professor Emeritus of Law and Economics. His most recent book, The Economic Structure of Intellectual Property Law, written with Judge Richard A. Posner, applies economic analysis to the many legal doctrines in trademark, copyright, trades ecret, and patent law. Landes has been an editor of the Journal of Law and Economics (1975–1991) and the Journal of Legal Studies (1991–2000) and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Landes serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Cultural Economics. Recent articles include “The Economics of Presidential Pardons and Commutations,” with Richard A. Posner, Journal of Legal Studies, 2009; and “Rational Judicial Behavior: A Statistical Study,” with Richard A. Posner, Journal of Legal Analysis, 2009.

SAUL LEVMORE is the William B. Graham Distinguished Service Professor of Law and served as Dean of the Law School 2001–2009. His most recent book, The Offensive Internet: Speech, Privacy and Reputation, edited with Martha Nussbaum, was published by Harvard University Press in 2010. His writing has cut across many fields and most recently has concentrated on topics in public choice, Internet anonymity, financial and risk regulation, and double jeopardy. Recent publications include “Bargaining with Double Jeopardy,” with Ariel Porat, Journal of Legal Studies, 2011; “Ambiguous Statutes,” University of Chicago Law Review, 2010; and “Interest Groups and the Problem with Incrementalism,” University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 2010.

ANUP MALANI is Lee and Brena Freeman Professor of Law; Professor at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine; a University Fellow at Resources for the Future, Washington, D.C.; a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research; and an editor of the Journal of Law and Economics. Malani graduated from the Law School in 2000 and received a PhD from the University of Chicago’s Department of Economics in 2003. He clerked for the Honorable Stephen F. Williams, US Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, in 2000–2001 and for US Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor in 2001–2002. His research interests include law and economics, health economics, and corporate law and finance. Recent publications include “Incentives for Reporting Infectious Disease Outbreaks,” with Ramanan Laxminarayan, Journal of Human Resources, 2011; “The Welfare Effects of FDA Regulation of Drugs,” with Tomas Philipson, in The Handbook of Pharmaceutical Economics, Patricia Danzon and Sean Nicholson, editors, 2010; and “Ambiguity about Ambiguity: An Empirical Inquiry into Legal Interpretation,” with Ward Farnsworth and David Guzior, Journal of Legal Analysis, 2010.

JONATHAN MASUR is Assistant Professor of Law and Herbert and Marjorie Fried Teaching Scholar. Masur received a BS in physics and an AB in political science from Stanford University in 1999 and his JD from Harvard Law School in 2003. After graduating from law school, he clerked for Judge Richard Posner of the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and for Chief Judge Marilyn Hall Patel of the US District Court for the Northern District of California. He taught at the Law School as a Bigelow Fellow and Lecturer in Law before joining the faculty in 2007. His research and teaching interests include administrative law, legislation, behavioral law and economics, patent law, and criminal law. Recent publications include “Patent Liability Rules as Search Rules,” University of Chicago Law Review, 2011; “Regulating Patents,” Supreme Court Review, 2011; and “Costly Screens and Patent Examination,” Journal of Legal Analysis, 2011.

RICHARD H. MCADAMS, Bernard D. Meltzer Professor of Law, came to the Law School in 2007. McAdams teaches primarily in the area of criminal law and procedure. His scholarship focuses on criminal law and procedure, social norms, discrimination, and inequality. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science and is active in the American Law and Economics Association. Recent publications include “The Expressive Power of Adjudication in an Evolutionary Context,” in Law, Economics, and Evolutionary Theory, P. Zumbansen and G.P. Calliess, editors, 2011; and “Economic Costs of Inequality,” University of Chicago Legal Forum, 2010. Forthcoming work includes “Punitive Police? Agency Costs, Law Enforcement, and Criminal Procedure,” with D. Dharmapala and N. Garoupa; and “The Power of Focal Points Is Pervasive: Experimental Studies of Game Labels in Disparate Settings,” with J. Nadler. McAdams is also working on a book, The Expressive Powers of Law, under contract with Harvard Universitypress.

THOMAS J. MILES is Professor of Law and an editor of the Journal of Legal Studies. He received his BA in political science and economics summa cum laude from Tufts University. After college, he was a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, where he received the Bank President’s Award for Outstanding Achievement. Miles was a doctoral fellow at the American Bar Foundation and received his PhD in economics from the University of Chicago. He received his JD cum laude from Harvard Law School. Professor Miles served as a law clerk to the Honorable Jay S. Bybee of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Before joining the faculty, he was the Olin Fellow in Law and Economics at the Law School. He has taught federal criminal law, federal regulation of securities, torts, economic analysis of law, the seminar on empirical law and economics, and the workshop on crime and punishment. In 2009, Miles received the Graduating Students Award for Teaching Excellence. His principal research interests include criminal law and judicial behavior. His most recent articles include “Depoliticizing Administrative Law ” with Cass Sunstein, in Ideology, Law & Psychology, Jon Hanson, editor, 2011; and “Dupes and Losers in Mail Fraud,” University of Chicago Law Review, 2010. He also coedited with Steven D. Levitt the collected volume Economics of the Criminal Law, 2008.

RANDAL C. PICKER is Paul and Theo Leffmann Professor of Commercial Law and Senior Fellow, the Computation Institute of the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. Picker graduated from the College of the University in 1980 cum laude with a BA in economics and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He received a master’s degree from the Department of Economics in 1982 and a JD from the Law School cum laude in 1985. He is a member of the Order of the Coif. While at the Law School, Picker was an Associate Editor of the Law Review. After graduation, Picker clerked for Judge Richard A. Posner of the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and spent three years with Sidley & Austin in Chicago. Picker’s primary areas of interest are the laws relating to intellectual property, competition policy and regulated industries, and applications of game theory and agent-based computer simulations to the law. Recent articles include “The Razors-and-Blades Myth(s),” University of Chicago Law Review, 2011; and “The Google Book Search Settlement: A New Orphan-Works Monopoly,” Journal of Competition Law and Economics, 2009.

ERIC A. POSNER is Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law and Aaron Director Research Scholar. He is an editor of the Journal of Legal Studies and a member of the Committee on International Relations at the University of Chicago. He has published articles on bankruptcy law, contract law, international law, cost-benefit analysis, constitutional law, and administrative law and has taught courses on international law, foreign relations law, contracts, employment law, bankruptcy law, secured transactions, and game theory and the law. His current research focuses on international law, immigration law, and foreign relations law. His most recent book is The Executive Unbound: After the Madisonian Republic, published be Oxford University Press in 2011 and coauthored with Adrian Vermeule. He is a graduate of Yale College and Harvard Law School. His book Climate Change Justice, coauthored with David Weisbach, was published in 2010 by Princeton University Press, and The Economics of Public International Law, which he edited, was published in 2010 by Edward Elgar. Recent publications include “Constitutional Possibility and Constitutional Evolution,” in Law, Economics and Evolutionary Theory, Peer Zumbansen and Gralf-Peter Calliess, editors, 2011; “The Right to Withdraw in Contract Law,” with Omri Ben-Shahar, Journal of Legal Studies, 2011; and “Economic Foundations of the Law of the Sea,” with Alan Sykes, American Journal of International Law, 2010.

RICHARD POSNER is a Senior Lecturer in Law and a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Following his graduation from Harvard Law School, Judge Posner clerked for Justice William J. Brennan Jr. From 1963 to 1965, he was assistant to Commissioner Philip Elman of the Federal Trade Commission. For the next two years he was assistant to the solicitor general of the United States. He first came to the University of Chicago Law School in 1969 and was Lee and Brena Freeman Professor of Law prior to his judicial appointment in 1981. He was the chief judge of the court from 1993 to 2000. Judge Posner has written more than 40 books, most recently Economic Analysis of Law (eighth edition, 2011) and The Crisis of Capitalist Democracy (2010), and hundreds of articles in legal and economic journals and book reviews in the popular press. He has taught administrative law, antitrust, economic analysis of law, history of legal thought, conflict of laws, regulated industries, law and literature, the legislative process, family law, primitive law, torts, civil procedure, evidence, health law and economics, law and science, and jurisprudence. He was the founding editor of the Journal of Legal Studies and (with Orley Ashenfelter) the American Law and Economics Review. He is also a coauthor, with Gary Becker, of the tremendously popular Becker-Posner Blog.

JULIE ROIN is the Seymour Logan Professor of Law. She received her BA from Harvard-Radcliffe College in 1977 and her JD from Yale Law School in 1980. Following law school, Roin clerked for the Honorable Patricia M. Wald of the US Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. She then practiced general tax law for three years with the Washington, D.C., law firm of Caplin & Drysdale. Prior to joining the Law School in 1998, she was the Henry L. & Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School. Her primary research interest is federal income taxation, in particular its international aspects. She teaches both federal incometax and state and local government courses. Her book International Business and Economics: Law and Policy, fourth edition, coauthored with Paul Stephan, was published in 2010. Recent publications include “Privatization and the Sale of Tax Revenues,” Minnesota Law Review, 2011; and “The Limits of Textualism: Cooper v. IBM Personal Pension Plan,” University of Chicago Law Review, 2010.

ANDREW M. ROSENFIELD is a Senior Lecturer in Law. An economist and a lawyer, he was educated at Kenyon College, Harvard University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Chicago Law School. Rosenfield is a Managing Partner of Guggenheim Partners LLC and Managing Partner and the Chief Executive of The Greatest Good (TGG), an economics and philanthropic consulting firm. TGG is led by Rosenfield, Steven Levitt, and John List, among others, and includes as partners many of the world’s best economists including Nobel Laureates Daniel Kahneman and Gary Becker. Rosenfield was for more than 20 years (through its sale to a public company) Chief Executive Officer of Lexecon Inc., a firm that he cofounded in 1977 with Richard A. Posner and William M. Landes. Rosenfield also is active in the Chicago community and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the University of Chicago and Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Art Institute of Chicago.

MICHAEL H. SCHILL is Dean of the Law School and Harry N. Wyatt Professor of Law. He is a national expert on real estate and housing policy, deregulation, finance, and discrimination. He has written or edited three books and over 40 articles on various aspects of housing, real estate, and property law. He is an active member of a variety of public advisory councils, editorial boards, and community organizations. Before joining the faculty of the University of Chicago Law School, Dean Schill was Dean and Professor of Law at the UCLA School of Law, the Wilf Family Professor in Property Law at New York University School of Law, and professor of urban planning at NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. From 1994 to 2004, Dean Schill served as the director of the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy. Prior to that, Schill was a tenured professor of law and real estate at the University of Pennsylvania. His book Property, seventh edition, with Jesse Dukeminier, James Krier, and Greg Alexander, was published in 2010 by Aspen Law and Business.

LIOR J. STRAHILEVITZ is Deputy Dean and Sidley Austin Professor of Law. He received his BA in political science from the University of California at Berkeley in 1996, graduating with highest honors. He received his JD in 1999 from Yale Law School, where he served as Executive Editor of the Yale Law Journal. Following his graduation, he clerked for Judge Cynthia Holcomb Hall on the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He then practiced law in Seattle before joining the Law School faculty in 2002. He was tenured in 2006, became Deputy Dean in 2010, and was named the inaugural Sidley Austin Professor of Law in 2011. His primary interests are in the areas of property, intellectual property, and privacy. His book Information and Exclusion was published by the Yale University Press in 2011. Recent articles include “Unilateral Relinquishment of Property,” in Research Handbook on the Economics of Property Law, Kenneth Ayotte and Henry E. Smith, editors, 2011; “Pseudonymous Litigation,” University of Chicago Law Review, 2010; and “Reunifying Privacy Law,” California Law Review, 2010.

DAVID A. WEISBACH is Walter J. Blum Professor of Law and Senior Fellow, the Computation Institute of the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. He received his BS in mathematics from the University of Michigan in 1985; a master of advanced study (mathematics) from Wolfson College, Cambridge in 1986; and a JD from Harvard Law School in 1989. Weisbach clerked for Judge Joel M. Flaum of the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and subsequently worked as an associate in the law firm of Miller & Chevalier and at the Department of Treasury in the Office of the Tax Legislative Counsel before joining the Chicago faculty in 1998. Weisbach is primarily interested in issues relating to federal taxation and to climate change. His principal research interests include all aspects of federal taxation and related areas of research, such as government budget policy. His book Climate Change Justice, coauthored with Eric Posner, was published by Princeton University Press in 2010. Recent publications include “Discount Rates, Social Judgments, Individuals’ Risk Preferences, and Uncertainty,” with Louis Kaplow, Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 2011; and “The Regulation of Tax Advice and Advisors,” Tax Notes, 2011.

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