UChicago Law & Economics Lecture Series - Paris 2018: The Regulation of Consumer Markets

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Add to Calendar 2018-06-25 08:00:00 2018-06-29 17:00:00 UChicago Law & Economics Lecture Series - Paris 2018: The Regulation of Consumer Markets

The week-long program for the UChicago Law and Economics Lecture Series is intended for active academics and researchers working in the field—junior faculty, post-docs, and advanced PhD students. This advanced workshop will have five topics and several special events. Each topic will include three hours of lectures, all in English.

Programming made possible through the generous gift of Bryant and Linda Edwards with support from the Coase-Sandor Institute.

Application is now open.

2018 Program Curriculum – Lecture Series

Regulatory Techniques in Consumer Protection

Professor Omri Ben-Shahar, Kearney Faculty Director of the Coase-Sandor Institute

This lecture series provides an economic framework to examine regulation of contracts, with particular focus on consumer markets. It surveys the cutting edge economic justifications and critiques of standard form contract, mandate disclosure, “nudges,” mandatory rules, and how non-legal mechanisms can replace some functions of private law.

Redistribution Through Regulation

Professor Daniel Hemel

Should policymakers pursue distributional goals through regulatory mechanisms, or should they set regulations based on other criteria and leave distributional questions to the tax-and-transfer system?  Drawing on perspectives from welfare economics, public choice, sociology, and social and political psychology, this lecture series examines the case for redistribution through regulation, and its applications in the fields of antitrust, consumer protection, labor law, land use, and torts.

Behavioral Law and Economics in Consumer Markets

Professor Jonathan Masur

When consumers make decisions, their choices are not always fully rational.  Whether they are saving for retirement, selecting and using credit cards, or choosing which products and services to pay for, they exhibit hyperbolic discounting, are subject to framing and status quo effects, and behave in a variety of other boundedly rational ways.  This lecture series explores the ways laws can protect consumers against irrationality the mechanisms the law might employ to correct consumers’ errors.

Information and Big Data in Private Law

Professor Ariel Porat

Big Data has enormous potential to change private law. This lecture series will explore the future of “personalized law” in contracts and tort law—namely, whether legal rules should be adapted to the different characteristics and attributes of the individual parties involved. It will also explore how courts could utilize aggregate information to improve decisions.

Internet Regulation

Professor Randal Picker

This lecture series considers regulation of the internet. Day-to-day life is shaped by the rules that operate on the internet. And much of what happens on the internet is shaped by the decisions that governments and dominant firms make. These lectures will focus on how these choices shape the lives of consumers and will consider topics such as search, network neutrality and the role of intermediaries on the internet.

Cost

COST
$2000 USD $1250 USD
  • Includes five nights hotel stay
  • all lectures and special events
  • lunch and light refreshments   

**Transportation cost is not included

  • Includes all lectures and special events
  • lunch and light refreshments  

**Hotel and transportation costs are not included 

 

Target Audience

This advanced workshop is intended for active academics and researchers working in the field—junior faculty, post-docs, and advanced PhD students.

University of Chicago Center in Paris Paris - FR University of Chicago Law School blog@law.uchicago.edu America/Chicago public
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University of Chicago Center in Paris
6 Rue Thomas Mann
75013 Paris
France

Open to the public

The week-long program for the UChicago Law and Economics Lecture Series is intended for active academics and researchers working in the field—junior faculty, post-docs, and advanced PhD students. This advanced workshop will have five topics and several special events. Each topic will include three hours of lectures, all in English.

Programming made possible through the generous gift of Bryant and Linda Edwards with support from the Coase-Sandor Institute.

Application is now open.

2018 Program Curriculum – Lecture Series

Regulatory Techniques in Consumer Protection

Professor Omri Ben-Shahar, Kearney Faculty Director of the Coase-Sandor Institute

This lecture series provides an economic framework to examine regulation of contracts, with particular focus on consumer markets. It surveys the cutting edge economic justifications and critiques of standard form contract, mandate disclosure, “nudges,” mandatory rules, and how non-legal mechanisms can replace some functions of private law.

Redistribution Through Regulation

Professor Daniel Hemel

Should policymakers pursue distributional goals through regulatory mechanisms, or should they set regulations based on other criteria and leave distributional questions to the tax-and-transfer system?  Drawing on perspectives from welfare economics, public choice, sociology, and social and political psychology, this lecture series examines the case for redistribution through regulation, and its applications in the fields of antitrust, consumer protection, labor law, land use, and torts.

Behavioral Law and Economics in Consumer Markets

Professor Jonathan Masur

When consumers make decisions, their choices are not always fully rational.  Whether they are saving for retirement, selecting and using credit cards, or choosing which products and services to pay for, they exhibit hyperbolic discounting, are subject to framing and status quo effects, and behave in a variety of other boundedly rational ways.  This lecture series explores the ways laws can protect consumers against irrationality the mechanisms the law might employ to correct consumers’ errors.

Information and Big Data in Private Law

Professor Ariel Porat

Big Data has enormous potential to change private law. This lecture series will explore the future of “personalized law” in contracts and tort law—namely, whether legal rules should be adapted to the different characteristics and attributes of the individual parties involved. It will also explore how courts could utilize aggregate information to improve decisions.

Internet Regulation

Professor Randal Picker

This lecture series considers regulation of the internet. Day-to-day life is shaped by the rules that operate on the internet. And much of what happens on the internet is shaped by the decisions that governments and dominant firms make. These lectures will focus on how these choices shape the lives of consumers and will consider topics such as search, network neutrality and the role of intermediaries on the internet.

Cost

COST
$2000 USD $1250 USD
  • Includes five nights hotel stay
  • all lectures and special events
  • lunch and light refreshments   

**Transportation cost is not included

  • Includes all lectures and special events
  • lunch and light refreshments  

**Hotel and transportation costs are not included 

 

Target Audience

This advanced workshop is intended for active academics and researchers working in the field—junior faculty, post-docs, and advanced PhD students.