Video Archives

  • Jul 23, 2013

    Based on media reports, it appears that sexual violence against women is increasing around the world, particularly in India and Egypt. Are the rates increasing or just the reporting of the crimes?  Governments and advocates around the world have been working on eradicating gender-based...

  • Jul 18, 2013

    There has been an increase in the rate of women’s imprisonment in many countries around the world.  Yet many countries fail to adequately address the unique issues raised when women are deprived of their liberty.  The panelists will discuss the causes of the increase in rates of...

  • Jun 27, 2013

    Featuring remarks by Michael Schill, Dean and Harry N. Wyatt Professor of Law; Steve Koch, '82, Deputy Mayor of Chicago; Saul Levmore, William B. Graham Distinguished Service Professor of Law. Recorded at Rockefeller Chapel on June 15, 2013.

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  • Jun 11, 2013

    Constitutions are quintessentially national documents, expressing the fundamental values of a sovereign people. They are traditionally interpreted and enforced by local constitutional courts.

  • Jun 10, 2013

    Rate regulation today is often conceived of as an exotic topic of interest only to a select group of pointy-headed specialists. But the truth is quite the opposite. The history of rate regulation raises some of the most fundamental challenges to the organization of a free society.

  • Jun 07, 2013

    The Constitution’s amendment rule in Article V renders the text inflexible, countermajoritarian, and insensitive to important contemporary constituencies. Comparative empirical studies show that textual rigidity is not only rare in other countries’ organic documents but highly correlated...

  • Jun 06, 2013

    Justice Albie Sachs of the Constitutional Court of South Africa discussed the Fourie case, gay rights, and the same-sex marriage decision in South Africa. This lecture was recorded on April 9, 2013.

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  • Jun 03, 2013

    Suitably organized, corporate groups mimic the capacities of individual persons and operate as agents with minds of their own. And in order to function in this agential manner, they have to be assigned legal rights that they can assert or transfer or waive in their dealings with others.

  • May 20, 2013

    This event was recorded on May 11, 2013 and was cosponsored by The University of Chicago Law School, the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago, and the University of Chicago Institute of Politics.

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  • May 16, 2013

    Does the U.S. Constitution have what it takes to keep up with modern America? Peter Sagal—host of "Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!"—recently hit the road to find out. In his new four-part PBS series, Sagal travels across the country by motorcycle in search of how the U.S. Constitution works and...

  • May 06, 2013

    To mark the publication of the new book, "Restoring Justice: The Speeches of Attorney General Edward H. Levi" by Jack Fuller, our distinguished guests join us to discuss his impact on the office. Formal remarks by U.S.

  • Apr 26, 2013

    Geoffrey Stone (Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago Law School) explores the history of laws against contraception, including discussion of those who struggled against those laws, how the tide turned, and what role the courts played in that process. This...

  • Mar 15, 2013

    Constitutional lawyers tend to study constitutions as sets of legal rules and judicial decisions. But written constitutions are also products, with different design features: they can be more or less detailed, innovative, or ambitious; they can be produced in a more or less inclusive manner; and...

  • Feb 25, 2013

    What limits should the government be allowed to impose on people who want to give money to a political campaign, or spend money in support of a campaign? The question is complex, difficult, and very important. Limits on the way money can be used to support candidates can undermine democracy -...

  • Feb 21, 2013

    Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is the primary tool used by policymakers to inform administrative decisionmaking. Yet its methodology of converting preferences (often hypothetical ones) into dollar figures, then using those dollar figures as proxies for quality of life, creates systemic errors so...

  • Jan 22, 2013

    Federal Criminal Justice Clinic director Alison Siegler discusses a recent case that she and her students worked on at the FCJC, a legal clinic at the University of Chicago Law School that represents indigent defendants charged with...