Chicago's Best Ideas

Chicago's Best Ideas - Nicholas Stephanopoulos, "The South After Shelby County"

Date: 
11.13.2013
Location: 
Room II

In Shelby County v. Holder, the Supreme Court dismantled one of the two pillars of the Voting Rights Act: Section 5, which had barred southern jurisdictions from changing their election laws unless they first received federal approval. The burning question now is what will happen to minority representation in the South in the absence of Section 5. In this talk, Prof.

Chicago's Best Ideas: Saul Levmore, "Coase's Legacy"

Date: 
10.22.2013
Location: 
Room II

Ronald Coase (1910-2013), of Nobel Prize and University of Chicago Law School fame, influences almost every discussion in the modern law school. In this opening talk of the 2013-14 "Chicago's Best Ideas" (CBI) series, Professor Levmore begins by explaining the Coase Theorem – probably Chicago's very best and certainly best known idea – and why its appearance was so startling.

Faculty: 
Saul Levmore

Tom Ginsburg, "An International Court for Constitutional Law"

Constitutions are quintessentially national documents, expressing the fundamental values of a sovereign people. They are traditionally interpreted and enforced by local constitutional courts.


59:04 minutes (54.08 MB)

Tom Ginsburg, "An International Court for Constitutional Law"

Constitutions are quintessentially national documents, expressing the fundamental values of a sovereign people. They are traditionally interpreted and enforced by local constitutional courts.

Richard Epstein, "A History of Public Utility Regulation in the Supreme Court"

Rate regulation today is often conceived of as an exotic topic of interest only to a select group of pointy-headed specialists. But the truth is quite the opposite. The history of rate regulation raises some of the most fundamental challenges to the organization of a free society.

Aziz Huq, "What Good is Article V?: A Defense of Our Rigid and Inflexible Constitution"

The Constitution’s amendment rule in Article V renders the text inflexible, countermajoritarian, and insensitive to important contemporary constituencies. Comparative empirical studies show that textual rigidity is not only rare in other countries’ organic documents but highly correlated with constitutional failure.

Aziz Huq, "What Good is Article V?: A Defense of Our Rigid and Inflexible Constitution"

The Constitution’s amendment rule in Article V renders the text inflexible, countermajoritarian, and insensitive to important contemporary constituencies. Comparative empirical studies show that textual rigidity is not only rare in other countries’ organic documents but highly correlated with constitutional failure.


59:34 minutes (54.53 MB)

Richard Epstein, "A History of Public Utility Regulation in the Supreme Court"

Rate regulation today is often conceived of as an exotic topic of interest only to a select group of pointy-headed specialists. But the truth is quite the opposite.  The history of rate regulation raises some of the most fundamental challenges to the organization of a free society.


60:07 minutes (55.04 MB)

Geoffrey Stone, "When Contraception Was a Crime"

Geoffrey Stone (Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago Law School) explores the history of laws against contraception, including discussion of those who struggled against those laws, how the tide turned, and what role the courts played in that process. This talk was recorded on February 19, 2013, as part of the Chicago's Best Ideas lecture series.

Geoffrey Stone, "When Contraception Was a Crime"

Geoffrey Stone (Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago Law School) explores the history of laws against contraception, including discussion of those who struggled against those laws, how the tide turned, and what role the courts played in that process. This talk was recorded on February 19, 2013, as part of the Chicago's Best Ideas lecture series.


58:04 minutes (53.17 MB)
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