Chicago's Best Ideas

Chicago's Best Ideas - Professor Emily Buss, "Court Reform in the Juvenile Justice System: Can a Change in Process Enhance Juvenile Offenders’ Prospects?"

Date: 
02.28.2014
Location: 
Room II

Over 100 years ago, Chicago led the way in establishing separate courts for young people who committed crimes.  These Juvenile Courts, soon in operation in every state, had two interrelated aims:  The first was to separate adolescent offenders from adult criminals.  The second aim was to help young offenders to grow up to become law-abiding citizens, although we knew much less th

Faculty: 
Emily Buss

Chicago's Best Ideas: Professor Martha Nussbaum, "What Is Anger, and Why Should We Care?"

Date: 
01.14.2014
Location: 
Room II

Although everyone is familiar with the damage anger can do in both personal and public life, people tend to think that it is necessary for the pursuit of justice.  People who don't get angry when they are wronged seem weird to many people, lacking spine and self-respect.  And isn't it servile not to react with anger to great injustice, whether toward oneself or toward others?&nb

Faculty: 
Martha Nussbaum

Saul Levmore, "Coase's Legacy"

Ronald Coase (1910-2013), of Nobel Prize and University of Chicago Law School fame, influences almost every discussion in the modern law school. In this opening talk of the 2013-14 "Chicago's Best Ideas" (CBI) series, Professor Levmore begins by explaining the Coase Theorem -- probably Chicago's very best and certainly best known idea -- and why its appearance was so startling.


61:51 minutes (56.63 MB)

Saul Levmore, "Coase's Legacy"

Ronald Coase (1910-2013), of Nobel Prize and University of Chicago Law School fame, influences almost every discussion in the modern law school. In this opening talk of the 2013-14 "Chicago's Best Ideas" (CBI) series, Professor Levmore begins by explaining the Coase Theorem -- probably Chicago's very best and certainly best known idea -- and why its appearance was so startling.

Chicago's Best Ideas with Brian Leiter, "Why Tolerate Religion?"

Date: 
11.19.2013
Location: 
Room II

Is there a principled reason why religious obligations that conflict with the law are accorded special toleration while other obligations of conscience are not? In Why Tolerate Religion? (Princeton, 2013), Professor Leiter argues there are no good reasons for doing so, that the reasons for tolerating religion are not specific to religion but apply to all claims of conscience.

Faculty: 
Brian Leiter

Chicago's Best Ideas - Nicholas Stephanopoulos, "The South After Shelby County"

Date: 
11.13.2013
Location: 
Room II

In Shelby County v. Holder, the Supreme Court dismantled one of the two pillars of the Voting Rights Act: Section 5, which had barred southern jurisdictions from changing their election laws unless they first received federal approval. The burning question now is what will happen to minority representation in the South in the absence of Section 5. In this talk, Prof.

Chicago's Best Ideas: Saul Levmore, "Coase's Legacy"

Date: 
10.22.2013
Location: 
Room II

Ronald Coase (1910-2013), of Nobel Prize and University of Chicago Law School fame, influences almost every discussion in the modern law school. In this opening talk of the 2013-14 "Chicago's Best Ideas" (CBI) series, Professor Levmore begins by explaining the Coase Theorem – probably Chicago's very best and certainly best known idea – and why its appearance was so startling.

Faculty: 
Saul Levmore

Tom Ginsburg, "An International Court for Constitutional Law"

Constitutions are quintessentially national documents, expressing the fundamental values of a sovereign people. They are traditionally interpreted and enforced by local constitutional courts.


59:04 minutes (54.08 MB)

Tom Ginsburg, "An International Court for Constitutional Law"

Constitutions are quintessentially national documents, expressing the fundamental values of a sovereign people. They are traditionally interpreted and enforced by local constitutional courts.

Richard Epstein, "A History of Public Utility Regulation in the Supreme Court"

Rate regulation today is often conceived of as an exotic topic of interest only to a select group of pointy-headed specialists. But the truth is quite the opposite. The history of rate regulation raises some of the most fundamental challenges to the organization of a free society.

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