Chicago's Best Ideas

Richard McAdams, "How Law Works Expressively"

Although people sometimes violate the law, there is more legal compliance than we can explain by ordinary economic theory – that legal sanctions deter noncompliance. In some domains of international law and constitutional law, there is no credible threat of legal sanctions, yet there is compliance.

Participating faculty: 
Richard H. McAdams
Related article: 
Why Do People Obey the Law?

Chicago's Best Ideas: Professor Aziz Huq

Date: 
05.05.2015
Location: 
Classroom III

Hobby Lobby and the Psychology of Corporate Rights

Faculty: 
Aziz Huq

Chicago's Best Ideas: Professor Richard A. Epstein

Date: 
04.22.2015
Location: 
Classroom III

Reasonable and Unreasonable Expectations in Property Law and Beyond

Faculty: 
Richard A. Epstein

Chicago’s Best Ideas: Alison Siegler “The Courts of Appeals’ Latest Sentencing Rebellion”

Date: 
04.13.2015
Location: 
Classroom II

For over twenty-five years, federal courts of appeals have rebelled against every Supreme Court mandate that weakens the federal sentencing Guidelines. That rebellion has intensified since the Court dealt a blow to the Guidelines a decade ago by making them advisory, rather than mandatory.

Faculty: 
Alison Siegler

Chicago's Best Ideas: Professor Omri Ben-Shahar

Date: 
03.03.2015
Location: 
Classroom III
Faculty: 
Omri Ben-Shahar

Chicago's Best Ideas: Professor William Baude

Date: 
02.13.2015
Location: 
Classroom II

Is Originalism Our Law?

Faculty: 
William Baude

Chicago's Best Ideas: Professor Richard McAdams, "How Law Works Expressively"

Date: 
01.06.2015
Location: 
Classroom II

Although people sometimes violate the law, there is more legal compliance than we can explain by ordinary economic theory – that legal sanctions deter noncompliance. In some domains of international law and constitutional law, there is no credible threat of legal sanctions, yet there is compliance.

Faculty: 
Richard H. McAdams

Chicago's Best Ideas: Alison LaCroix, "The Shadow Powers of Article I"

Date: 
01.28.2015

The Supreme Court's federalism battleground has recently shifted from the Commerce Clause to two textually marginal but substantively important domains: the Necessary and Proper Clause and, to a lesser extent, the General Welfare Clause.  For nearly a decade, these quieter, more structurally ambiguous federal powers – the “shadow powers” – have steadily increased in prominence.

Faculty: 
Alison LaCroix

Adam Chilton, "Why We Know Very Little About the Effectiveness of International Law, and How Experiments Might Help to Change That"

While scholars in most fields argue about how laws can be changed to maximize their effectiveness, scholars of international law still regularly debate whether many of the most prominent international agreements have any effect on state behavior.

Participating faculty: 
Adam Chilton

Adam Chilton, "Why We Know Very Little About the Effectiveness of International Law, and How Experiments Might Help to Change That"

While scholars in most fields argue about how laws can be changed to maximize their effectiveness, scholars of international law still regularly debate whether many of the most prominent international agreements have any effect on state behavior.

While scholars in most fields argue about how laws can be changed to maximize their effectiveness, scholars of international law still regularly debate whether many of the most prominent international agreements have any effect on state behavior.

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