Chicago's Best Ideas

Saul Levmore, "From the Wheel to Open Source Software: Growth and Property Rights"

Reasonably secure property rights are widely understood as important for economic growth, though it is also understood that interest groups and politicians can benefit from particular configurations of rights. What might change in a world where intellectual property dominates? How should we expect innovators to be motivated in the next century?


57:48 minutes (52.92 MB)

CBI: Alicia Davis, "Is There a Corporate Governance Clientele Effect?"

Date: 
11.16.2010
Location: 
Room I

Institutional investors, because of their relatively larger ownership stakes, have more incentive than retail investors to monitor the companies in which they invest, particularly if it is costly to exit.

CBI: Dean Michael Schill, "The Mortgage Meltdown and Its Aftermath: Homeownership, Mortgage Law and the Future of Housing Finance"

Date: 
11.09.2010
Location: 
Room II

The spectacular rise and fall of the housing market over the past decade has shaken the foundations of virtually every aspect of our economy.

Faculty: 
Michael H. Schill

CBI: Saul Levmore, "From the Wheel to Open Source Software: Growth and Property Rights"

Date: 
10.12.2010
Location: 
Room II

Reasonably secure property rights are widely understood as important for economic growth, though it is also understood that interest groups and politicians can benefit from particular configurations of rights. What might change in a world where intellectual property dominates? How should we expect innovators to be motivated in the next century?

Faculty: 
Saul Levmore

Anup Malani, “Is it Possible to Interpret Statutes 'Objectively?'"

Anup Malani is Professor of Law and Aaron Director Research Scholar at the University of Chicago Law School. This Chicago's Best Ideas talk was recorded May 1, 2010 at the Law School's annual Reunion celebration.


59:57 minutes (54.88 MB)

M. Todd Henderson, "Unsafe Harbors"

Most of what we think about as "law" involves a background rule that conduct is legal with an exception for what lawmakers define as illegal. But there are several other ways in which law is made. The most obvious is the concept of a "safe harbor," where the background rule is that conduct is illegal with an exception for what lawmakers define as legal.


84:29 minutes (77.35 MB)

Geof Stone, "OT 1972: A Year With Justice Brennan"

In 1972-73, Geoffrey Stone served as a law clerk to Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. The 1972 Term was an eventful one for the Supreme Court, resulting in landmark decisions in such areas as obscenity, equal protection, abortion, and criminal procedure.


66:50 minutes (61.19 MB)

Geof Stone, "OT 1972: A Year With Justice Brennan"

In 1972-73, Geoffrey Stone served as a law clerk to Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. The 1972 Term was an eventful one for the Supreme Court, resulting in landmark decisions in such areas as obscenity, equal protection, abortion, and criminal procedure.

Richard Epstein, "Can the United States Survive Health Care Reform?"

The recent health care bill represents what is likely to turn out to be the most comprehensive health care reform ever, Medicare included. Yet many of its provisions were included in the last minute without serious discussion or debate. And those provisions that have been in all versions of the bill since the outset are likely to have profound, if unintended consequences.


61:08 minutes (55.97 MB)

Richard Epstein, "Can the United States Survive Health Care Reform?"

The recent health care bill represents what is likely to turn out to be the most comprehensive health care reform ever, Medicare included. Yet many of its provisions were included in the last minute without serious discussion or debate. And those provisions that have been in all versions of the bill since the outset are likely to have profound, if unintended consequences.

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