Academic conference

India in the Global Legal Context: Courts, Culture, and Commerce

Date: 
04.04.2014 - 04.05.2014
Location: 
John Hope Franklin Room (Social Sciences 224)
Contact info (email or phone): 

Deepa Das Acevedo JD'16 (ndd@uchicago.edu)

This two day symposium explores Indian legal approaches to issues like urban displacement, patent law, access to justice, and gender discrimination. Faculty and graduate students from the Law School, Social Sciences, and Humanities will join visiting scholars from around the country.

Keynote speaker: Marc Galanter, University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School.

Faculty: 
Martha Nussbaum
Faculty: 
Anup Malani

Nina Perales, "Keynote, Legal Forum Symposium: The Civil Rights Act at 50"

Nina Perales is Vice-President of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund. This talk was recorded November 18, 2013.


64:07 minutes (58.7 MB)

Crime in Law and Literature Conference Plenary Talk and Panel, featuring Scott Turow

Recorded on February 7, 2014, this session featured author Scott Turow as Plenary Speaker and Law School faculty Alison LaCroix, Judge Diane Wood, and Richard McAdams.


79:20 minutes (72.63 MB)

Crime in Law and Literature Conference Plenary Talk and Panel, featuring Scott Turow

Recorded on February 7, 2014, this session of the Conference on Crime in Law and Literature featured author Scott Turow as Plenary Speaker and Law School faculty Alison LaCroix, Judge Diane Wood, and Richard McAdams.

Conference: Criminal Procedure in the Spotlight

Date: 
05.30.2014 - 05.31.2014
Location: 
Room V
Contact info (email or phone): 

Marjorie Holme, mholme@uchicago.edu, 773-702-0220

Criminal Procedure in the Spotlight
Theoretical, Constitutional, and Administrative Developments

Organized by Richard Epstein, Richard McAdams, and Alison Siegler

Sponsored by the University of Chicago Law Review, the Coase-Sandor Instittue for Law and Economics, and the Classical Liberal Institute at New York University School of Law.

Faculty: 
Richard A. Epstein
Faculty: 
Richard H. McAdams
Faculty: 
Alison Siegler

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration

Date: 
05.03.2013
Location: 
Coulter Lounge at the International House

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration, Session 4

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.


64:30 minutes (59.05 MB)

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration, Session 3

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.


63:19 minutes (57.97 MB)

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration, Session 2

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.


70:03 minutes (64.13 MB)

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration, Session 1

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.


71:44 minutes (65.67 MB)
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