Fulton Lecture in Legal History

The 2017 Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lectureship in Legal History

Date: 
04.20.2017
Location: 
Weymouth Kirkland Courtroom
Contact info (email or phone): 

ewellin@uchicago.edu

The Long Reach of the Sixties:
LBJ, Nixon, and the Making of the Contemporary Supreme Court

Featuring Laura Kalman,
Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara

The 2016 Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lectureship in Legal History

Date: 
04.20.2017
Location: 
Weymouth Kirkland Courtroom

John Fabian Witt, "Weapons of Truth: Money, Propaganda, and Civil Liberties in World War I America"

A century ago, World War I set the modern First Amendment into motion.  But wartime propaganda also gave rise to a critique that has shadowed speech rights right up through Citizens United and into our own time.  For the war showed speech not only to be a form of protest, but also a form of power.

Participating faculty: 
Tom Ginsburg
Embedded video: 

John Fabian Witt, "Weapons of Truth: Money, Propaganda, and Civil Liberties in World War I America"

In his lecture, Professor Witt tells the story of a small but diverse group of Americans who took control of a Wall Street fortune to battle power with power, establishing a foundation with a breathtaking aim: to change the American mind.

A century ago, World War I set the modern First Amendment into motion.  But wartime propaganda also gave rise to a critique that has shadowed speech rights right up through Citizens United and into our own time.  For the war showed speech not only to be a form of protest, but also a form of power.

Fulton Lecture with John Fabian Witt: "Weapons of Truth: Money, Propaganda, and Civil Liberties in World War I America"

Date: 
04.19.2016
Location: 
Courtroom
Contact info (email or phone): 

ewellin@uchicago.edu

A century ago, World War I set the modern First Amendment into motion.  But wartime propaganda also gave rise to a critique that has shadowed speech rights right up through Citizens United and into our own time.  For the war showed speech not only to be a form of protest, but also a form of power.

Faculty: 
Alison L. LaCroix

Fulton Lecture with David Lieberman: "Courts, Democracy and Jeremy Bentham"

Date: 
05.07.2015
Location: 
Room V
Contact info (email or phone): 

ewellin@uchicago.edu

The contribution of courts to the operations of constitutional democracy is a familiar issue in contemporary constitutional and political theory, rendered all the more vital in an era when the practice of judicial review has been extended globally.

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, "The Honor and Burden of Being First: Judge Constance Baker Motley at the Bar and on the Bench"

Professor Brown-Nagin's talk examines the legacy of The Honorable Constance Baker Motley—and break new ground in the study of civil rights, women's rights, and the legal profession. A protégée of Thurgood Marshall, Motley litigated in southern courtrooms during the 1940s and 1950s, when women lawyers scarcely appeared before the bar.

Embedded video: 

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, "The Honor and Burden of Being First: Judge Constance Baker Motley at the Bar and on the Bench"

Professor Brown-Nagin's talk examines the legacy of The Honorable Constance Baker Motley—and break new ground in the study of civil rights, women's rights, and the legal profession. A protégée of Thurgood Marshall, Motley litigated in southern courtrooms during the 1940s and 1950s, when women lawyers scarcely appeared before the bar.

Fulton Lecture in Legal History: Tomiko Brown-Nagin, "The Honor and Burden of Being First: Judge Constance Baker Motley at the Bar and on the Bench"

Date: 
05.08.2014
Location: 
Courtroom
Contact info (email or phone): 

For special assistance or needs, please contact Rebecca Klaff at 773-834-4326, or rklaff@law.uchicago.edu

Professor Brown-Nagin’s talk will examine the legacy of The Honorable Constance Baker Motley—and break new ground in the study of civil rights, women’s rights, and the legal profession. A protégée of Thurgood Marshall, Motley litigated in southern courtrooms during the 1940s and 1950s, when women lawyers scarcely appeared before the bar.

David Armitage, "Civil War: A Genealogy"

Civil war is like pornography--we think know it when we see it. Yet ideas of civil war have a long and contested history with multiple meanings and contested applications. This lecture offers a critical history of conceptions of civil war, with special attention to its legal definition since the nineteenth century.

Syndicate content