Faculty Podcast

Futterman, McAdams, and Strahilevitz on "United States v. Jones"

In November, the Supreme Court heard arguments in United States v. Jones, which will decide whether the Constitution allows police to put a tracking device on a car without either a warrant or the owner's permission.


12:44 minutes (11.66 MB)

Lior Strahilevitz, “Exclusion and Exclusivity: Past, Present & Future”

This lecture was recorded October 27, 2011, at the celebration of Deputy Dean Lior Strahilevitz's appointment as the Law School's inaugural Sidley Austin Professor of Law.


88:32 minutes (81.06 MB)

Conference on Constitutions in Authoritarian Regimes: Session II

Constitutions, it is conventionally believed, are institutions that define and limit the boundaries of government.  Yet the formal constitution is an institution adopted by virtually every modern political regime, including many that would appear to have no interest in codifying any form of limitation on government power.


89:50 minutes (82.24 MB)

Aziz Huq, "Changing the Rules of the Game as You Play: The Supreme Court at the Cusp of O.T. 2011"

This lecture by Assistant Professor of Law Aziz Huq was recorded October 3, 2011, as part of the Law School's annual First Mondays lecture series.


65:08 minutes (59.63 MB)

Saul Levmore, "Ponzi Schemes and Law's Domain"

Ponzi schemes come in many sizes. The colossal fraud engineered by Bernard Madoff is an occasion to rethink the legal rules and remedies associated with such episodes. But then there are smaller Ponzi-like schemes, such as fraud in law school admissions, and the question of whether law does or should play any role.


59:53 minutes (54.82 MB)

Panel Discussion: Hot Topics in Tech Law

This panel, sponsored by Law, Inc. and held on April 28, 2011, discussed hot topics in techology policy, law, and innovation.

Participants included:


65:00 minutes (59.51 MB)

Gender, Law, and the British Novel: The Nature of Law

This panel was recorded May 15, 2010, as part of the conference "Gender, Law, and the British Novel," organized by Martha Nussbaum, Alison LaCroix, and Jane Dailey. Participants included:


136:14 minutes (124.72 MB)

Panel: "China, the WTO, and International Economic Law"

This panel was recorded April 6, 2011, as part of the China and International Law Symposium sponsored by the Confucius Institute and the University of Chicago Law School.


100:59 minutes (92.46 MB)

Hendrik Hartog, "Quantum Meruit and Old Age Care in American Family Life"

This Fulton Lecture in Legal History, recorded May 5, 2011, draws from Professor Hartog's forthcoming book, Someday All This Will Be Yours: A History of Inheritance and Old Age. It uses transcripts from a series of late nineteenth and early twentieth century New Jersey cases to explore the problem of who should be paid for household work and for intimate caretaking.


92:17 minutes (84.49 MB)

Joshua Cohen, "Democracy v. Citizens United?"

The 2011 Dewey Lecture in Law and Philosophy entitled "Democracy v. Citizens United?," was presented on April 20, 2011, by Joshua Cohen, the Marta Sutton Weeks Professor of Ethics in Society and Professor of Political Science, Philosophy, and Law at Stanford University.


104:17 minutes (95.48 MB)
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