Faculty Podcast

Gary Haugen and Richard Posner, 2009 Hooding Ceremony Remarks

Gary Haugen is a 1991 graduate of the Law School and President and CEO of International Justice Mission, a human rights agency that secures justice for victims of slavery, sexual exploitation and other forms of violent oppression. He received the Law School's Distinguished Citizen Award. Richard Posner is Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Chicago Law School and Judge on the U.S.

34:16 minutes (31.38 MB)

Madhavi Sunder, "Reading the Qur'an in Kuala Lumpur"

The Enlightenment took us from a world of Empire to an Age of Reason and equality in the public sphere. But it left the private spheres of culture and religion in the Dark Ages of imposition and unreason. In the Enlightenment worldview, freedom in the public sphere is freedom itself.

58:33 minutes (53.6 MB)

David Weisbach, "Climate Change: What Do We Know? What Do We Need to Know?"

David Weisbach is Walter J. Blum Professor of Law and Kearney Director of the Program in Law and Economics. This talk was recorded April 22, 2009 and was sponsored by the Environmental Law Society.

48:49 minutes (44.69 MB)

"Law Enforcement and Fairness in Shakespeare" feat. D. Wood, F. Easterbrook, D. Bevington, R. McAdams, and R. Strier

This panel was recorded on May 16, 2009 as part of the University of Chicago Law School's "Shakespeare and the Law" Conference. The papers presented included "Equity in Measure for Measure" (David Bevington), "Law, Disobedience, Justification and Mercy" (Diane Wood), "Criminal Responsibility in Shakespeare" (Richard McAdams) and “Shakespeare's Problems with Law” (Richard Strier).

142:01 minutes (130.02 MB)

Jeremy Epstein, "Problems of Litigating WWII Art Restitution Claims"

Jeremy Epstein is a Lecturer in Law at the University of Chicago where he teaches a seminar about litigating title disputes in art law. He is a partner in the Litigation Group of Shearman & Sterling and, from 1995-2000, served as head of the Litigation Department.

48:14 minutes (44.16 MB)

Geoffrey Stone, "Obama's Supreme Court"

What will the election of Barack Obama mean for the Supreme Court of the United States? To answer this question, it is necessary to understand the current make-up of the Court and its direction. What are the predispositions of the current Justices? What do we mean today by the terms "liberal" and "conservative"?

52:35 minutes (48.15 MB)

Adam Cox and Rosalind Dixon: "Immigration and Human Rights: Prospects and Perils"

This discussion, the inaugural event of the International Human Rights Society, explored the role rights discourse can and should play in advocacy for renewed efforts towards immigration reform under the Obama administration. Adam Cox and Rosalind Dixon are Assistant Professors of Law at the University of Chicago Law School.

53:29 minutes (48.97 MB)

"The First Fifty Years are the Hardest: Defining Future Models of Clinical Legal Education"

This panel, which discussed new clinical strategies and methods, featured Craig Futterman (Clinical Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School), Stephen Wizner (William O. Douglas Clinical Professor, Yale Law School), Marc Kadish (Director of Pro Bono Activities, Mayer Brown), and Michael Pinard (Professor of Law, University of Maryland Law School).

87:23 minutes (80.01 MB)

Conference Panel: "Reputation and Cyberspace"

This conference panel, recorded November 22, 2008 at the Law School's "Speech, Privacy, and the Internet: The University and Beyond" conference, features Visting Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School Anupam Chander (“Youthful Indiscretion in an Internet Age”), Professor of Law and Walter Mander Teaching Scholar at the University of Chicago Law School Lior Strahilevitz, ("Reha

114:57 minutes (105.24 MB)

Omri Ben-Shahar, "Myths of Consumer Protection: Information, Litigation, and Access"

Omri Ben-Shahar is Frank and Bernice J. Greenberg Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded February 17, 2009 as the annual Ronald H. Coase Lecture in Law and Economics.

67:34 minutes (61.87 MB)
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