Faculty Podcast

Jonathan Masur, "The Assertive Supreme Court: Patent Law and the Future of Economic Regulation"

Jonathan Masur is Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded October 5, 2009 as part of the Law School's annual First Monday Lecture Series.


34:52 minutes (31.93 MB)

Douglas Baird, "Eero Saarinen's Law School"

This Chicago's Best Ideas lecture was recorded May 2, 2009, as part of the Law School's annual reunion festivities. Douglas Baird is Harry A. Bigelow Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School.


62:14 minutes (56.98 MB)

Alison Siegler and Students, "Clinics in Action: The Federal Criminal Justice Project"

Assistant Clinical Professor of Law Alison Siegler, as well as students Stephanie Holmes, Brynn Lyerly, Emma Mittelstaedt, Chris Stanton, Daniel Bork, Kristin Love, and James Burnham, discuss the work of the Federal Criminal Justice Project.


58:03 minutes (53.15 MB)

M. Todd Henderson, "The Nanny Corporation"

We are all familiar with the Nanny State: governments telling us what we can put in our bodies, to wear seatbelts, not to talk on our cell phones while driving, and so on. But governments are not the only institutions that act paternalistically—we are seeing the rise of the Nanny Corporation.


65:23 minutes (59.87 MB)

Richard Epstein, "On the Record about Off-Label Drug Uses"

This talk was recorded May 1, 2009, at the University of Chicago Law School's annual Loop Luncheon. Richard Epstein is James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago Law School.


52:35 minutes (48.14 MB)

M. Gregg Bloche, "Doctors and Interrogators: Implications of the CIA Torture Memos"

M. Gregg Bloche, M.D., J.D., was Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, Professor of Law at Georgetown University, and Non-Resident Senior Fellow (on leave) at the Brookings Institution.   Dr.


41:39 minutes (38.13 MB)

James Q. Whitman, "The Verdict of Battle"

In its classic form, a “decisive” pitched battle was a beautifully contained event, lasting a single day, killing only combatants, and resolving legal questions of immense significance. Yet since the mid-nineteenth century, pitched battles no longer decide wars, which now routinely degenerate into general devastation. Why did pitched battle ever work as a conflict resolution device?


65:14 minutes (59.73 MB)

Gary Haugen and Richard Posner, 2009 Hooding Ceremony Remarks

Gary Haugen is a 1991 graduate of the Law School and President and CEO of International Justice Mission, a human rights agency that secures justice for victims of slavery, sexual exploitation and other forms of violent oppression. He received the Law School's Distinguished Citizen Award. Richard Posner is Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Chicago Law School and Judge on the U.S.


34:16 minutes (31.38 MB)
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