Facilities

8.1   BUILDING HOURS

The hours during which law students will be able to access the Law School and Library vary throughout the school year (longer hours during exams and shorter hours during the summer) but are generally:

  • Monday – Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 a.m. (Library opens at 8:00 a.m.)
  • Saturday – Sunday:  9:00 a.m. - 12:00 a.m. (Library opens at 10:00 a.m. on Saturdays and 12:00 p.m. on Sundays)

Members of the University who are not enrolled in the Law School have access to the building and Library when the Library’s Circulation Desk is open. The Library’s hours when classes are in session are as follows:

  • Monday – Thursday: 8:00 a.m - 9:00 p.m.
  • Friday: 8:00 a.m - 6:00 p.m.
  • Saturday: 10:00 a.m - 6:00 p.m.
  • Sunday: 12:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

A receptionist or Visitor Control Attendant (VCA) is present at all times when the building is open.

It is the VCA’s responsibility to ensure access to the building is restricted to those who are authorized and to check the bags and briefcases of those exiting to make sure books have been properly checked out. S/he is also responsible for checking to make sure all exterior doors are securely locked and alarmed, and for escorting students to their cars in the Law School parking lot at night upon request. All students must be out of the building by the time the VCA leaves for the night. Staying in the building after the VCA departs for the evening is grounds for disciplinary action.

The VCA takes periodic walks throughout the building, lasting for approximately 10 minutes at a time.

Students are not to allow admittance to the building by an individual who is not a Law School student, faculty member, or staff member.  Guests should be referred to the receptionist or the VCA.

Non-service animals are not permitted in the building.

8.2 BUILDING SERVICES

The Facilities Office has primary responsibility for the daily operation and maintenance of the Law School Building.  If you wish to report a problem with the building (heating, lighting, etc.), please see a member of the Facilities staff, Room K007, or email facilities@uclaw.uchicago.edu. The Associate Dean for Administration (Room A202, 773-834-3790), is ultimately responsible for building operations.

8.3 GREEN LOUNGE

The Harold J. Green Lounge is the focal point and “living room” of the Law School. Please help maintain the Green Lounge and clean your tables after you have eaten, and remember to deposit any trash (food containers and wrappers, papers, etc.) in the trash cans and recycle bins located throughout the Green Lounge. Do not post notices/signs on any building surfaces in the Green Lounge.

8.4 LOCKERS

Lockers in the Law School Lower Level are automatically assigned to all students by the Administrative and Faculty Support Specialist.  Students leave items in lockers at their own risk.  Please keep your valuables with you.  Please also make sure that the door is secured and that you spin the dial after you close the locker door. If there is a mechanical problem with your locker, please report it to the Administrative and Faculty Support Specialist in the Office of the Registrar or to the Facilities staff (facilities@uclaw.uchicago.edu). Graduating students must remove all personal items from their lockers by the date specified by the Office of the Dean of Students, or the items will be discarded.

8.5 MAINTENANCE

The Facilities Office has primary responsibility for the daily operation and maintenance of the Law School Building.  If you wish to report a problem with the building (heating, lighting, etc.), please see a member of the Facilities staff, Room K007, or email facilities@uclaw.uchicago.edu. The Associate Dean for Administration (Room A207, 773-834-3790), is ultimately responsible for building operations.

8.6 LOST AND FOUND

Found items are deposited in one of three areas:

  1. Library Circulation Desk
  2. Reception/VCA Desk
  3. Facilities Office (K007)

8.7 SMOKING POLICY

Under the University’s campus-wide non-smoking policy, no smoking is permitted in University buildings or within 15 feet of any building entrance.

8.8 THE BUILDING AND ITS ART

What critics have said…

The Law School Building

. . . . When the Laird Bell Law quadrangle was designed in 1959, the University of Chicago acquired a major building by the noted modern architect Eero Saarinen. Sensitive to the existing campus architecture, Saarinen referred to his style as “neogothic,” yet the very structure and materials – glass, steel, and concrete – exemplified a contemporary aesthetic objective and philosophical idea of clarity. More than thirty years later, this complex functions as a prime example of modernism. . . . (Judith Russi Kirshner, Critic, Curator and Director of the School of Art & Design at the University of Illinois at Chicago.)

. . . . Saarinen’s four buildings comprising the Law School complex are joined by organic passageways that lead without interruption from library to classrooms, from offices to auditorium. Here an authentic environment has been created, meaningful, useful, and vigorous. As Saarinen himself said, “The buildings were designed to function for the University of Chicago Law School and not for anything else. The over-all concept seeks to reflect the importance to the legal profession of both the written and the spoken word.” Hence the pivotal position and dominating design of the library; hence the emphasis on free meeting areas for open discussion. (Katherine Kuh, “Fresh Breezes in the Windy City,” Saturday Review, July 25, 1964.)

The Paintings in the Green Lounge

. . . . In this series, as in Ledgerwood’s other major commissions, abstraction is the culmination of a complex and intuitive process in which light, color, shape and scale have been orchestrated to suggest but never completely represent natural phenomena, landscapes, and skyscapes. Like other recognized artists of her generation often labeled postmodernist, Ledgerwood acknowledges and appropriates the art historical tradition of sublime romantic painting. For this unique situation she planned her murals to offset and complement the symmetries of the room and to correspond to the views outside, the reflecting pool, and beyond that to the luminous presence of Lake Michigan as a dominant condition of the city’s horizon. Although her landscape references are overt, Ledgerwood invents these expansive compositions in a quartet which moves across several spectrums: from the referential to the abstract, from warm to cool coloration, and from flatness to atmospheric depth. The paintings can be read metaphorically as the four seasons, four times of the day, or four directional coordinates as they orient us in this space to respond specifically to the light levels in each corner. Those very same natural conditions will have their particular effect on the paintings which will in turn vary as the seasons and light evolve and change. (Judith Russi Kirshner, Critic, Curator and Director of the School of Art & Design at the University of Illinois at Chicago.)

The Sculpture in the Fountain

 . . . . Conceived by Antoine Pevsner, noted Russian constructivist artist who lived in Paris from 1923 until his death in 1962, the soaring bronze abstraction named Construction in Space in the Third and Fourth Dimension, a title which on first acquaintance may seem unduly pretentious but which after adequate study becomes entirely valid. For what happens here is peculiarly related to the dimensions of space and time. The sculpture, specifically planned to be seen from all sides, changes as the observer varies his position, an act requiring deliberation. To view it from a window in the Law Library is a radically different experience from approaching it at street level. Rarely has a sculpture been more fully oriented to the multilateral possibilities of its structure. It seems to unfold, to move not only in space but in time with an almost hypnotic rhythm, and yet this bronze is static, securely fastened to a magnificent granite base (also designed by Pevsner). Convoluted free planes are so interpenetrated with linear ribs as to suggest the process of evolving growth.... (Katherine Kuh, “Fresh Breezes in the Windy City,” Saturday Review, July 25, 1964.)