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Erica Zunkel : Courses and Seminars

Federal Criminal Justice Clinic
LAWS 67513
The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
Autumn 2014
Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
Federal Criminal Justice Clinic
LAWS 67513
The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
Winter 2015
Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
Federal Criminal Justice Clinic
LAWS 67513
The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
Spring 2015
Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
The Legal and Social Implications of the War on Drugs
LAWS 98704
The seminar will survey the War on Drugs from President Richard Nixon’s declaration in 1970 that drug abuse was “public enemy number one in America” to present. It can be argued that no development in recent times has had a greater impact on our criminal justice system than the War on Drugs. It has led to the passage of increasingly harsh laws and a resulting explosion in our prison population. More Americans are arrested for a drug offense each year—approximately 1.5 million in 2011—than for any other category of crime. Approximately half of all inmates in federal prison have been convicted of a drug crime. Meanwhile, the War on Drugs has raised significant constitutional issues, and has led to seminal Fourth, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendment decisions. The seminar will begin by examining arguments for and against drug prohibition and the proliferation of new drug laws in the 1970s and 1980s. We will then discuss the enforcement of these laws and its effect on civil liberties. After that, we will discuss appropriate punishment for drug offenses, law enforcement techniques in drug cases, and rationales for legalization and harm reduction strategies. Throughout the quarter, we will focus on the social implications of the War on Drugs, including issues of race, gender, public health, mass incarceration, and resource allocation. Readings are varied and will include cases, law review articles, legislation, statutes, and policy papers. Each student is required to write a series of reaction papers over the course of the quarter. Grades will be based on those papers, as well as class participation.
Spring 2015
Erica Zunkel