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Jennifer Nou : Courses and Seminars

Administrative Law
LAWS 46101
This course examines the structure of the administrative state, its relations to the other branches of government and private citizens, and the constitutional, statutory, and common law rules that govern the substance and procedure of administration action and inaction. The course focuses on some constitutional topics, including the non-delegation doctrine, presidential control over administrative agencies, and the delegation of adjudicative authority to non-Article III officers. Substantial attention is given to the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and other statutory requirements for lawful agency action. Covered topics include the proper role of agencies in interpreting statutory and regulatory law; judicial review of agency decisions; and public participation in agency rulemaking. A central theme of the course is how the law manages the tension between rule of law values (e.g., procedural regularity, accountability, and substantive limits on arbitrary action) and the desire for flexible, effective administrative governance. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
Autumn 2014
Jennifer Nou
Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary
LAWS 95902
There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2014
Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory
LAWS 63402
Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to submit one reaction paper per quarter on a paper of their choosing.
Autumn 2014
R. H. Helmholz, Alison LaCroix, Jonathan Masur, Richard H. McAdams, Jennifer Nou
Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary
LAWS 95902
There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2015
Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory
LAWS 63402
Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to submit one reaction paper per quarter on a paper of their choosing.
Winter 2015
R. H. Helmholz, Alison LaCroix, Jonathan Masur, Richard H. McAdams, Jennifer Nou
Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary
LAWS 95902
There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
Spring 2015
Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
Legislation and Statutory Interpretation
LAWS 44201
Much of lawyers' work today involves the close reading and interpretation of statutes or like texts. The focus of this class is the study of current interpretive theories and their application. The class also encompasses political theory and public choice approaches to the legislative process as they relate to legal interpretation. The class has the aim of bolstering students' capacity to work with statutes in law school and beyond. At the end of the class, students will have a thorough grasp of the process through which statutes are produced by the legislative branch and their interpretation by the courts. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
Spring 2015
Jennifer Nou
Regulatory Interpretation
LAWS 51604
This seminar will explore whether regulatory texts warrant interpretive theories distinct from those applicable to statutes, and what those approaches should entail. Relevant topics will include the institutional differences between agencies and Congress; judicial doctrines regarding an agency’s interpretation of its own rules; and the extent to which agencies should interpret regulations differently than courts. Administrative Law or Legislation and Statutory Interpretation is a prerequisite (both are recommended); students who have not taken either will require instructor permission. Grades will be based on class participation, including weekly short questions or comments posted to Chalk, and a research paper.
Spring 2015
Jennifer Nou
Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory
LAWS 63402
Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to submit one reaction paper per quarter on a paper of their choosing.
Spring 2015
R. H. Helmholz, Alison LaCroix, Jonathan Masur, Richard H. McAdams, Jennifer Nou