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Mark N. Templeton : Courses and Seminars

Abrams Environmental Law Clinic
LAWS 67813
Primarily through litigation, students in the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic work to address climate change, water pollution and legacy contamination and to protect natural resources and human health. To date, the Clinic has focused on holding accountable natural resource extraction companies for actual or anticipated damage to the environment, as well as the government agencies that permit such activities. The Clinic has also recently become more involved in the development and implementation of rules and regulations regarding climate change, renewable energy, and energy efficiency, with an eye toward future litigation on these issues. Clinic students engage in a wide variety of activities to learn practical legal skills, from conducting factual investigations, to interviewing witnesses and preparing affidavits, to reviewing administrative determinations, to drafting motions, to conducting depositions, to working with experts, to arguing motions and to presenting at trial or an administrative hearing. The Clinic generally represents regional and national environmental organizations and works with co-counsel, thus exposing students to the staff of these organizations and other experienced environmental lawyers. The Clinic may also engage in legislative reform and rule-making efforts; students interested solely in that kind of work should notify the instructor before joining the clinic, if possible. Students interested in environmental transactional work should let the instructor know so that projects around this kind of work can be developed. While it helps for students to have taken or be taking one or more of Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Evidence, or Trial Advocacy, these courses are not pre-requisites or co-requisites. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have an environmental, science or engineering background; all are welcome.
Autumn 2014
Mark N. Templeton, Sean Helle
Abrams Environmental Law Clinic
LAWS 67813
Primarily through litigation, students in the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic work to address climate change, water pollution and legacy contamination and to protect natural resources and human health. To date, the Clinic has focused on holding accountable natural resource extraction companies for actual or anticipated damage to the environment, as well as the government agencies that permit such activities. The Clinic has also recently become more involved in the development and implementation of rules and regulations regarding climate change, renewable energy, and energy efficiency, with an eye toward future litigation on these issues. Clinic students engage in a wide variety of activities to learn practical legal skills, from conducting factual investigations, to interviewing witnesses and preparing affidavits, to reviewing administrative determinations, to drafting motions, to conducting depositions, to working with experts, to arguing motions and to presenting at trial or an administrative hearing. The Clinic generally represents regional and national environmental organizations and works with co-counsel, thus exposing students to the staff of these organizations and other experienced environmental lawyers. The Clinic may also engage in legislative reform and rule-making efforts; students interested solely in that kind of work should notify the instructor before joining the clinic, if possible. Students interested in environmental transactional work should let the instructor know so that projects around this kind of work can be developed. While it helps for students to have taken or be taking one or more of Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Evidence, or Trial Advocacy, these courses are not pre-requisites or co-requisites. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have an environmental, science or engineering background; all are welcome.
Winter 2015
Mark N. Templeton, Sean Helle
Environmental Law
LAWS 46001
This course introduces students to the laws, policies and theories related to environmental protection in the United States. No environmental, engineering or science background is required, and it is not necessary to take Administrative Law before or during enrollment in this course. The course begins by reviewing different, and often competing, objectives related to the environment: development and use of natural resources, preservation of nature, protection of human health, economic efficiency, and distributional equity. The course then explores in depth how the common law and the major federal environmental statues (e.g. the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, etc.) address these objectives. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
Winter 2015
Mark N. Templeton
Abrams Environmental Law Clinic
LAWS 67813
Primarily through litigation, students in the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic work to address climate change, water pollution and legacy contamination and to protect natural resources and human health. To date, the Clinic has focused on holding accountable natural resource extraction companies for actual or anticipated damage to the environment, as well as the government agencies that permit such activities. The Clinic has also recently become more involved in the development and implementation of rules and regulations regarding climate change, renewable energy, and energy efficiency, with an eye toward future litigation on these issues. Clinic students engage in a wide variety of activities to learn practical legal skills, from conducting factual investigations, to interviewing witnesses and preparing affidavits, to reviewing administrative determinations, to drafting motions, to conducting depositions, to working with experts, to arguing motions and to presenting at trial or an administrative hearing. The Clinic generally represents regional and national environmental organizations and works with co-counsel, thus exposing students to the staff of these organizations and other experienced environmental lawyers. The Clinic may also engage in legislative reform and rule-making efforts; students interested solely in that kind of work should notify the instructor before joining the clinic, if possible. Students interested in environmental transactional work should let the instructor know so that projects around this kind of work can be developed. While it helps for students to have taken or be taking one or more of Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Evidence, or Trial Advocacy, these courses are not pre-requisites or co-requisites. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have an environmental, science or engineering background; all are welcome.
Spring 2015
Mark N. Templeton, Sean Helle