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Mark N. Templeton : Courses and Seminars

Abrams Environmental Law Clinic
LAWS 90224
(A, SKLL, CLN)Students in the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic work to address climate change, water pollution and legacy contamination and to protect natural resources and human health. Clinic students engage in a wide variety of activities to learn practical legal skills, such as conducting factual investigations, interviewing witnesses and preparing affidavits, reviewing administrative determinations, drafting motions, working with experts, arguing motions and presenting at trial or an administrative hearing, among other activities. The Clinic generally represents regional and national environmental organizations and works with co-counsel, thus exposing students to the staff of these organizations and other experienced environmental lawyers. In addition to litigation, the Clinic may also engage in legislative reform and rule-making efforts; students interested solely in that kind of work should notify the instructor before joining the Clinic, if possible. While it helps for students to have taken or be taking one or more of Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Evidence, or Intensive Trial Practice, these courses are not pre-requisites or co-requisites. A student should plan to enroll in the Clinic for two credits per quarter, although he or she may enroll for one, two or three credits per quarter after consultation with clinic faculty.
Autumn 2016
Mark N. Templeton
Energy Law and Policy
LAWS 43282
(CORE, 1E)Energy markets and regulation have undergone significant changes in the past 20 years in the United States in attempts to improve reliability, to reduce costs, and to address environmental impacts, while meeting increased demand. Focusing primarily on electric power, this course will introduce students to energy economics and the principles and administration of public utility regulation. The class will trace the historical development of the regulated electric industry, review traditional sources of energy used to generate electricity (water, coal, and natural gas), and examine the current structure of the electric industry and emerging issues, including wholesale and retail competition, environmental effects (including climate change), renewable energy, conservation and efficiency.
Spring 2017
Mark N. Templeton