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Alison Siegler : Courses and Seminars

Federal Criminal Justice Clinic
LAWS 67513
The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
Autumn 2015
Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature
LAWS 95902
Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2015
Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
Federal Criminal Justice Clinic
LAWS 67513
The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
Winter 2016
Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature
LAWS 95902
Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2016
Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
Federal Criminal Justice Clinic
LAWS 67513
The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
Spring 2016
Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
Federal Criminal Procedure: From Bail to Jail
LAWS 47301
This course surveys the federal criminal process from the formal filing of charges in court through trial and beyond. While Criminal Procedure I examines the procedural rules that govern police investigations, this course examines the procedural rules that govern the criminal process after an arrest, as the case moves through the court process. (This course is not called “Criminal Procedure II” because Criminal Procedure I is not a prerequisite.) The law that governs after formal proceedings have commenced is based largely on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and on the Fifth and Sixth Amendments, but is less doctrinal and constitutional than the law that governs during the investigative stage of a case. Topics include: pretrial release and detention, the preliminary hearing, the grand jury, the charging instrument, joinder and severance, discovery, selected trial issues (including confrontation rights), plea bargaining and negotiation, and sentencing. We also examine prosecutorial discretion and ethical issues surrounding the representation of criminal defendants. Various guest speakers typically visit class, including federal district court judges, an Assistant United States Attorney, and a criminal defense lawyer. The final grade is based on an eight-hour take-home examination.
Spring 2016
Alison Siegler
Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature
LAWS 95902
Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
Spring 2016
Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler