View All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T V W Y Z

Richard H. McAdams : Courses and Seminars

Elements of the Law
LAWS 30101
This course examines certain issues that occur in many different areas of the law and considers the relationship between these issues and comparable questions in other fields of thought, such as moral and political philosophy, economics, and political theory. The subjects for discussion include the nature of, and justification for, reasoning from precedent; the meaning of such notions as consent, coercion, and voluntary choice; the decision whether to impose rules or allow discretion; the problems of interpreting statutes and other authoritative texts; and the objective or subjective nature of moral judgments. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
Autumn 2014
Richard H. McAdams
Criminal Law
LAWS 30311
This course, offered over two sequential quarters, addresses the doctrines of criminal liability and the moral and social problems of crime. The definitions of crimes and defenses are considered in light of the purposes of punishment and the role of the criminal justice system, including police and correctional agencies. The student's grade is based on class participation and a single final examination at the end of the Spring quarter.
Winter 2015
Richard H. McAdams
Hinton Moot Court Competition
LAWS 99911
The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
Winter 2015
Daniel Abebe, Elizabeth Duquette, Richard H. McAdams
Criminal Law
LAWS 30311
This course, offered over two sequential quarters, addresses the doctrines of criminal liability and the moral and social problems of crime. The definitions of crimes and defenses are considered in light of the purposes of punishment and the role of the criminal justice system, including police and correctional agencies. The student's grade is based on class participation and a single final examination.
Spring 2015
Richard H. McAdams