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Saul Levmore : Courses and Seminars

Copyright
LAWS 45801
This course explores the major areas of copyright law, with special emphasis on how law has responded to new technologies and political pressures. Topics include copyright duration, subject matter, and ownership; the rights and limitations of copyright holders, including the fair use doctrine; remedies for copyright infringement; and federal preemption of state law. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
Autumn 2015
Saul Levmore
Greenberg Seminar: Meritocracy?
LAWS 95902
What does a meritocracy look like? Is it related to democracy – and, if so, how do Chinese or other forms of meritocracy differ from ours? By the third seminar we will move to sports (pure meritocracy, it would seem – but what about accommodating disabilities and what of artificial enhancements that are against the rules?). Does the law regarding employment tests, not to mention law school itself, fit common sense notions of meritocracy? Are markets meritocratic or is that something different? If these questions interest you, then please join us (subject to registration space), but be sure your Thursday evenings are free in the Autumn and Winter Quarters. Credit may not be allocated to Spring. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2015
Saul Levmore, Julie Roin
Torts
LAWS 30611
The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence.
Autumn 2015
Saul Levmore
Greenberg Seminar: Meritocracy?
LAWS 95902
What does a meritocracy look like? Is it related to democracy – and, if so, how do Chinese or other forms of meritocracy differ from ours? By the third seminar we will move to sports (pure meritocracy, it would seem – but what about accommodating disabilities and what of artificial enhancements that are against the rules?). Does the law regarding employment tests, not to mention law school itself, fit common sense notions of meritocracy? Are markets meritocratic or is that something different? If these questions interest you, then please join us (subject to registration space), but be sure your Thursday evenings are free in the Autumn and Winter Quarters. Credit may not be allocated to Spring. Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2016
Saul Levmore, Julie Roin
Public Choice
LAWS 69001
This course focuses on the relationship between modern perspectives on voting and interest groups on the one hand and legislation and judicial interventions on the other. Public choice is essentially the science of collective decision-making, and it comes with several well developed tools of analysis. With these tools, and that perspective, we revisit the interactions between legislatures and judges, democracy's attempt to solve certain problems, and the roles played by a variety of legal doctrines and constitutional institutions (from takings law to line-item vetoes and to the meaning of precedents). As the course proceeds, we explore specific topics in law, such as the possibility of judicial vote-trading, the role of referenda in some jurisdictions but not others, and the role of precedent itself. Grades will be based on a final examination.
Winter 2016
Saul Levmore
Torts
LAWS 30611
The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence.
Winter 2016
Saul Levmore