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M. Todd Henderson : Courses and Seminars

Greenberg Seminar: Native Americans
LAWS 95902
In this Greenberg Seminar, professors Todd Henderson (Law) and Justin Richland (Anthropology) will lead discussions of works of fiction and non-fiction regarding Native Americans. Professor Henderson lived briefly on the Navajo/Hopi Reservation and recently taught a seminar on American Indian Law. Professor Richland specializes in Native American law and politics. He has served as a justice on the Hopi Appellate Court and is the founder of a non-profit designed to bring social justice services to native peoples. The historical plight of Native Americans is well known, but often misunderstood; the current situation is not as well known, and equally misunderstood where it is. The aim of this Greenberg is to put the history in perspective, and to illuminate the current situation of the nearly 500 semi-autonomous tribes of American Indians that exist today. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2014
M. Todd Henderson, Justin Richland
Torts
LAWS 30611
The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
Autumn 2014
M. Todd Henderson
Greenberg Seminar: Native Americans
LAWS 95902
In this Greenberg Seminar, professors Todd Henderson (Law) and Justin Richland (Anthropology) will lead discussions of works of fiction and non-fiction regarding Native Americans. Professor Henderson lived briefly on the Navajo/Hopi Reservation and recently taught a seminar on American Indian Law. Professor Richland specializes in Native American law and politics. He has served as a justice on the Hopi Appellate Court and is the founder of a non-profit designed to bring social justice services to native peoples. The historical plight of Native Americans is well known, but often misunderstood; the current situation is not as well known, and equally misunderstood where it is. The aim of this Greenberg is to put the history in perspective, and to illuminate the current situation of the nearly 500 semi-autonomous tribes of American Indians that exist today. Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2015
M. Todd Henderson
Torts
LAWS 30611
The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
Winter 2015
M. Todd Henderson
Uncorporations
LAWS 42305
Businesses today are more likely to be organized as limited partnerships, LLCs, trusts, or other alternatives to the standard corporation. In this seminar, we will examine these "uncorporate" entities in a range of contexts, ranging from law firms to investment funds to plain vanilla businesses. We will consider the theory of uncorporate entities, the major laws governing them, the differences between them and corporate entities, and the bubbling policy questions. Grades will be based on in-class presentations and a paper.
Winter 2015
M. Todd Henderson
Greenberg Seminar: Native Americans
LAWS 95902
In this Greenberg Seminar, professors Todd Henderson (Law) and Justin Richland (Anthropology) will lead discussions of works of fiction and non-fiction regarding Native Americans. Professor Henderson lived briefly on the Navajo/Hopi Reservation and recently taught a seminar on American Indian Law. Professor Richland specializes in Native American law and politics. He has served as a justice on the Hopi Appellate Court and is the founder of a non-profit designed to bring social justice services to native peoples. The historical plight of Native Americans is well known, but often misunderstood; the current situation is not as well known, and equally misunderstood where it is. The aim of this Greenberg is to put the history in perspective, and to illuminate the current situation of the nearly 500 semi-autonomous tribes of American Indians that exist today. Graded Pass/Fail.
Spring 2015
M. Todd Henderson, Justin Richland