View All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T V W Y Z

Tom Ginsburg : Courses and Seminars

Greenberg Seminar: Iran
LAWS 95902
Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2015
Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law
LAWS 95902
This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2015
Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan Masur
Hinton Moot Court Competition
LAWS 99911
The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judge the semi-final arguments and select the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
Autumn 2015
Tom Ginsburg
International Investment Law
LAWS 96405
Foreign investment is a central feature of the world economy, and plays an essential role in economic development. It involves a transaction in which an investor in one country (“home state”) sends capital to another (“host state”). But in many cases the transaction is subject to what is called in economics a “dynamic inconsistency problem”, in which the host state’s incentives change once the investment is sunk, and it may want to renege on its promises to the investor. Furthermore, neither side is likely to want any disputes adjudicated in the courts of the other’s country. The global investment regime has arisen to help resolve these problems. The regime includes bilateral investment treaties (known as BITs) as well as multilateral agreements that are embedded in broader treaty structures, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) or the Energy Charter Treaty. This course will introduce students to the operation of the investment law regime, with an emphasis on the tensions between home and host states, the impact of the regime on development outcomes, and the relationship between law and arbitration. There are no prerequisites.
Autumn 2015
Tom Ginsburg
The Chicago Journal of International Law
LAWS 99903
The Chicago Journal of International Law, a biannual student-edited journal, is the Law School’s newest journal. It publishes short Comments and articles by students and scholars on matters of international law and foreign affairs. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the journal, please visit http://cjil.uchicago.edu.
Autumn 2015
Tom Ginsburg
The University of Chicago Law Review
LAWS 99901
The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
Autumn 2015
Tom Ginsburg
The University of Chicago Legal Forum
LAWS 99902
The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
Autumn 2015
Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Iran
LAWS 95902
Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2016
Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law
LAWS 95902
This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2016
Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan Masur
Hinton Moot Court Competition
LAWS 99911
The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
Winter 2016
Tom Ginsburg
The Chicago Journal of International Law
LAWS 99903
The Chicago Journal of International Law, a biannual student-edited journal, is the Law School’s newest journal. It publishes short Comments and articles by students and scholars on matters of international law and foreign affairs. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the journal, please visit http://cjil.uchicago.edu.
Winter 2016
Tom Ginsburg
The University of Chicago Law Review
LAWS 99901
The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
Winter 2016
Tom Ginsburg
The University of Chicago Legal Forum
LAWS 99902
The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
Winter 2016
Tom Ginsburg
Comparative Legal Institutions
LAWS 50101
This course is designed to examine a range of legal institutions from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. It is not a traditional course in comparative law, in that it focuses not so much on particular rules of substantive law but on the structure of different legal systems and the consequences of those structural differences for law and society. In particular, we will focus on the economic impact of legal traditions. Readings will be drawn from legal and social science literature, including works from anthropology, economics, political science and sociology. The course will explicitly cover non-Western legal traditions to an extent not found in conventional comparative law courses. Furthermore, American institutions are explicitly included in the comparison: this is not simply a course in foreign law.
Spring 2016
Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Iran
LAWS 95902
Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
Spring 2016
Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law
LAWS 95902
This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Graded Pass/Fail.
Spring 2016
Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan Masur
Hinton Moot Court Competition
LAWS 99911
The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
Spring 2016
Tom Ginsburg
The Chicago Journal of International Law
LAWS 99903
The Chicago Journal of International Law, a biannual student-edited journal, is the Law School’s newest journal. It publishes short Comments and articles by students and scholars on matters of international law and foreign affairs. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the journal, please visit http://cjil.uchicago.edu.
Spring 2016
Tom Ginsburg
The University of Chicago Law Review
LAWS 99901
The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
Spring 2016
Tom Ginsburg
The University of Chicago Legal Forum
LAWS 99902
The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding credits and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
Spring 2016
Tom Ginsburg