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Tom Ginsburg : Courses and Seminars

Greenberg Seminar: Where Does the Rule of Law Come From?
LAWS 92000
(A, BID)Although the rule of law is the central political ideal of our time, we know very little about where it comes from or how to push political systems to have more of it. Perhaps there are some clues to be found from looking at its origins. Drawing on readings from anthropology and history, this seminar will interrogate the rule of law and its antecedents in pre-modern societies and early states.
Autumn 2016
Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law
LAWS 92000
(A, BID)This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Places will be reserved for 2 LL.M. students.Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2016
Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan S. Masur
Public International Law: Human Rights
LAWS 43285
(CORE, SRP, WP)This course is an introduction to public international law, which is the body of law that nation states have jointly created for the purpose of governing their relations. The course focuses on the sources of international law, international institutions such as the United Nations, and international adjudication. Most examples are drawn from the field of human rights so that the course can serve as an introduction to that topic as well. Grades will be based on class participation and an examination. A paper option is allowed for students who wish to write an SRP.
Autumn 2016
Tom Ginsburg
World Bank Practicum
LAWS 53376
(WP)This practicum involves preparing memoranda on various issues for the Legal Department of the World Bank under the supervision of Professor Ginsburg. Students work in small teams to analyze an array of policy and legal issues. Past topics have ranged from an analysis of sovereign wealth, to lending in post-conflict zones, to a study of remedies. The course is limited to a small number of students each quarter.
Autumn 2016
Tom Ginsburg
Comparative Legal Institutions
LAWS 43201
(WP, 1E, BID, CL, CORE)This course is designed to examine a range of legal institutions from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. It is not a traditional course in comparative law, in that it focuses not so much on particular rules of substantive law but on the structure of different legal systems and the consequences of those structural differences for law and society. In particular, we will focus on the economic impact of legal traditions. Readings will be drawn from legal and social science literature, including works from anthropology, economics, political science and sociology. The course will explicitly cover non-Western legal traditions to an extent not found in conventional comparative law courses. Furthermore, American institutions are explicitly included in the comparison: this is not simply a course in foreign law.
Spring 2017
Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Where Does the Rule of Law Come From?
LAWS 92000
(A)Although the rule of law is the central political ideal of our time, we know very little about where it comes from or how to push political systems to have more of it. Perhaps there are some clues to be found from looking at its origins. Drawing on readings from anthropology and history, this seminar will interrogate the rule of law and its antecedents in pre-modern societies and early states.
Spring 2017
Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law
LAWS 92000
(A)This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Places will be reserved for 2 LL.M. students.Graded Pass/Fail.
Spring 2017
Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan S. Masur
International Investment Law
LAWS 43265
(SRP, WP, BID, SEM)Foreign investment is a central feature of the world economy, and plays an essential role in economic development. It involves a transaction in which an investor in one country (home state) sends capital to another (host state). But in many cases the transaction is subject to what is called in economics a dynamic inconsistency problem, in which the host state’s incentives change once the investment is sunk, and it may want to renege on its promises to the investor. Furthermore, neither side is likely to want any disputes adjudicated in the courts of the other’s country. The global investment regime has arisen to help resolve these problems. The regime includes bilateral investment treaties (known as BITs) as well as multilateral agreements that are embedded in broader treaty structures, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) or the Energy Charter Treaty. This seminar will introduce students to the operation of the investment law regime, with an emphasis on the tensions between home and host states, the impact of the regime on development outcomes, and the relationship between law and arbitration. There are no prerequisites.
Spring 2017
Tom Ginsburg
World Bank Practicum
LAWS 53376
(WP)This practicum involves preparing memoranda on various issues for the Legal Department of the World Bank under the supervision of Professor Ginsburg. Students work in small teams to analyze an array of policy and legal issues. Past topics have ranged from an analysis of sovereign wealth, to lending in post-conflict zones, to a study of remedies. The course is limited to a small number of students each quarter.
Spring 2017
Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Where Does the Rule of Law Come From?
LAWS 92000
(A)Although the rule of law is the central political ideal of our time, we know very little about where it comes from or how to push political systems to have more of it. Perhaps there are some clues to be found from looking at its origins. Drawing on readings from anthropology and history, this seminar will interrogate the rule of law and its antecedents in pre-modern societies and early states.
Winter 2017
Tom Ginsburg
Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law
LAWS 92000
(A)This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Places will be reserved for 2 LL.M. students.Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2017
Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan S. Masur