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Elizabeth Duquette : Courses and Seminars

Moot Court Boot Camp
LAWS 99912
Moot Court Boot Camp has two components: oral advocacy and writing. The oral argument component will cover the basics of appellate oral argument. Students will receive two different cases and prepare and submit argument outlines in advance. During the workshop, students will gain hands-on experience by conducting multiple oral arguments before a variety of alumni and other practicing attorneys, judges, and faculty. The writing component will cover the basics of appellate brief writing. Students will use tight, persuasive writing to bolster arguments. We will focus on strong issue statements, effective headings, and powerful conclusions. We'll also explore sentence structure and word choice. Students will learn to define themes in their writing and carry them into the oral argument. Focused writing, we will learn, promotes successful oral advocacy. This class, which will meet for the weekend of October 17-18, is an optional supplement to the Hinton Moot Court Competition. The Saturday oral advocacy portion will be held at the offices of Jenner & Block (353 N. Clark Street, Chicago) and the Sunday portion on written advocacy will be held at the Law School. Credit will be granted upon completion of two judged arguments as part of the Hinton Moot Court Competition. Students who register for this class and fail to participate in the Hinton Moot Court Competition will be withdrawn from this class with a grade of W. Students will prepare a short, written assignment that we will discuss and revise during class. There are no prerequisites. Students may only receive credit for this class once during their Law School career. J.D. students only. Does not count towards the yearly seminars/simulation classes limit. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2015
Elizabeth Duquette, Amy M. Gardner
Writing and Research in the U.S. Legal System
LAWS 79903
In this seminar, international LLM students learn research and writing skills essential to the practice of U.S. law. Students learn how to use these skills to win arguments, persuade clients and sharpen their own thinking. We discuss and practice the major principles of legal writing in plain English – no jargon, no legalese. The class functions largely as a workshop where we apply multiple research techniques and analyze the impact of various writing styles. Students meet individually with the instructor throughout the course. Regular class attendance is mandatory. Students must complete all assignments before the take-home examination, which determines the student’s grade. This course is open only to LL.M. students and satisfies the legal research and writing prerequisite for the New York Bar exam.
Autumn 2015
Elizabeth Duquette, Margaret Schilt
Writing and Research in the U.S. Legal System
LAWS 79903
In this seminar, international LLM students learn research and writing skills essential to the practice of U.S. law. Students learn how to use these skills to win arguments, persuade clients and sharpen their own thinking. We discuss and practice the major principles of legal writing in plain English – no jargon, no legalese. The class functions largely as a workshop where we apply multiple research techniques and analyze the impact of various writing styles. Students meet individually with the instructor throughout the seminar. Regular class attendance is mandatory. Students must complete all assignments before the take-home examination, which determines the student’s grade. This seminar is open only to LL.M. students and satisfies the legal research and writing prerequisite for the New York Bar exam.
Winter 2016
Elizabeth Duquette, Margaret Schilt
Advanced Legal Writing
LAWS 79901
This course will prepare law students for the working world by honing writing skills for briefs, memoranda, motions and contracts. We will discuss and practice the major principles of legal writing in plain English -- no jargon, no legalese, no anachronistic fluff. In addition to fine-tuning basic and more advanced writing skills, students will learn how to use their writing to win arguments, persuade clients and sharpen their own thinking. The class will function largely as a workshop where we analyze the impact of various writing styles. Through exercises and group critiques, students will learn to write more succinctly and effectively. Better writers make better lawyers. Regular attendance is essential. The course concludes with an eight-hour take-home examination, which determines the student's grade. Students must complete all assignments before the exam. This course satisfies the Writing Project writing requirement. Legal Research and Writing is a pre-requisite.
Spring 2016
Elizabeth Duquette