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Herschella G. Conyers : Courses and Seminars

Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic
LAWS 67213
The Juvenile and Criminal Justice Clinic provides legal representation to poor children and young adults accused of delinquency and crime. The Clinic is a national leader in expanding the concept of legal representation to include the social, psychological and educational needs of clients. Students will examine the juvenile and criminal justice systems’ relationships to the poor and marginalized through litigation, legislative advocacy, and public education, including the development of policies for crime and violence prevention and system reform. Student work includes legal research and drafting motions, briefs, memoranda, and pleadings in state, appellate and federal courts as required. Students will interview clients and witnesses; conduct fact investigations; and develop effective pre- and post-trial strategies, including alternatives to incarceration. Trial work may include licensed students appearing in court to argue contested motions, negotiate with opposing counsel, and generally second-chair trials. In misdemeanor cases, students may first-chair trials. Licensed students may also present oral argument before appellate and federal courts. All students will participate in community, professional and bar association activities. Students work in teams to foster collaboration and ensure continuity in representation. The Clinic social worker and social work students are involved in many of the cases and activities. All students are encouraged to work creatively, and across disciplines. Participation includes weekly case meetings and obviously court appearances. Students wishing to enroll are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Other recommended courses: Criminal Procedure, Juvenile Justice, and Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or Trial Advocacy. Students may continue in the clinic throughout their 2 and 3L years: academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
Autumn 2013
Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic
LAWS 67213
The Juvenile and Criminal Justice Clinic provides legal representation to poor children and young adults accused of delinquency and crime. The Clinic is a national leader in expanding the concept of legal representation to include the social, psychological and educational needs of clients. Students will examine the juvenile and criminal justice systems’ relationships to the poor and marginalized through litigation, legislative advocacy, and public education, including the development of policies for crime and violence prevention and system reform. Student work includes legal research and drafting motions, briefs, memoranda, and pleadings in state, appellate and federal courts as required. Students will interview clients and witnesses; conduct fact investigations; and develop effective pre- and post-trial strategies, including alternatives to incarceration. Trial work may include licensed students appearing in court to argue contested motions, negotiate with opposing counsel, and generally second-chair trials. In misdemeanor cases, students may first-chair trials. Licensed students may also present oral argument before appellate and federal courts. All students will participate in community, professional and bar association activities. Students work in teams to foster collaboration and ensure continuity in representation. The Clinic social worker and social work students are involved in many of the cases and activities. All students are encouraged to work creatively, and across disciplines. Participation includes weekly case meetings and obviously court appearances. Students wishing to enroll are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Other recommended courses: Criminal Procedure, Juvenile Justice, and Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or Trial Advocacy. Students may continue in the clinic throughout their 2 and 3L years: academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
Spring 2014
Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic
LAWS 67213
The Juvenile and Criminal Justice Clinic provides legal representation to poor children and young adults accused of delinquency and crime. The Clinic is a national leader in expanding the concept of legal representation to include the social, psychological and educational needs of clients. Students will examine the juvenile and criminal justice systems’ relationships to the poor and marginalized through litigation, legislative advocacy, and public education, including the development of policies for crime and violence prevention and system reform. Student work includes legal research and drafting motions, briefs, memoranda, and pleadings in state, appellate and federal courts as required. Students will interview clients and witnesses; conduct fact investigations; and develop effective pre- and post-trial strategies, including alternatives to incarceration. Trial work may include licensed students appearing in court to argue contested motions, negotiate with opposing counsel, and generally second-chair trials. In misdemeanor cases, students may first-chair trials. Licensed students may also present oral argument before appellate and federal courts. All students will participate in community, professional and bar association activities. Students work in teams to foster collaboration and ensure continuity in representation. The Clinic social worker and social work students are involved in many of the cases and activities. All students are encouraged to work creatively, and across disciplines. Participation includes weekly case meetings and obviously court appearances. Students wishing to enroll are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Other recommended courses: Criminal Procedure, Juvenile Justice, and Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or Trial Advocacy. Students may continue in the clinic throughout their 2 and 3L years: academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
Winter 2014
Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
Intensive Trial Practice Workshop
LAWS 67503
This practicum teaches trial preparation, trial advocacy, and strategy through a variety of teaching techniques, including lectures and demonstrations, but primarily through simulated trial exercises. Topics include opening statements, witness preparation, direct and cross examination, expert witnesses, objections at trial, and closing argument. Practicing lawyers and judges are enlisted to provide students with lectures and critiques from varied perspectives. The practicum concludes with a simulated jury trial presided over by sitting state and federal court judges. Open to J.D. students only. Evidence is a prerequisite. Students taking the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop may enroll in Pre-Trial Advocacy. Completion of this workshop partially satisfies one of the requirements for admission to the trial bar of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. This practicum is open only to students entering their 3L year and limited to 48 with preference given to students who have been accepted into a Litigation Clinic course. Students who have taken Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603), Poverty and Housing Law Clinic (LAWS 90512), or Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy (LAWS 91702) may not take this course. The student's grade is based on class participation. This practicum meets daily for approximately six hours, September 16-27. The simulated trial will be on September 28, time TBD.
Autumn 2013
Herschella G. Conyers, Erica Zunkel, Craig B. Futterman, Randolph N. Stone
Life in the Law
LAWS 99403
This seminar will explore the various definitions and valuations of life across diverse areas of the law. Readings will include seminal cases in reproductive rights, assisted suicide, right-to-die, and capital punishment. Background readings in related areas, i.e., scientific journals, papers, etc. will also be required. The seminar will discuss policy decision-making including actuarial analysis and social, medical and religious values inherent, implicit or ignored in the legal analysis. Students will be required to write three short papers, co-draft a statute in one area of law, and participate in jury deliberations. Grade will also be based on class participation.
Spring 2014
Herschella G. Conyers
Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic
LAWS 67243
The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
Spring 2014
Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic
LAWS 67243
The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
Autumn 2013
Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic
LAWS 67243
The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
Winter 2014
Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone