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Daniel Abebe : Courses and Seminars

Canonical Ideas in Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will write short reaction papers on the readings, and each student will once during the term facilitate the class discussion of an article, drawing on their outside research to do so. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students are expected to produce papers of publishable quality because the seminar’s ultimate goal is to prepare students for the process of entering the legal academy. Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on the reaction papers, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Abebe, Malani, and Masur a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 21, 2014.
Autumn 2014
Daniel Abebe, Anup Malani, Jonathan Masur
Foreign Relations Law
LAWS 97801
This course examines the constitutional and statutory doctrines regulating the conduct of American foreign relations. Topics include the allocation of foreign relations powers between the three branches of the federal government, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the scope of the treaty power, the validity of executive agreements and the power to declare and conduct war. The course will also focus on the political question and other doctrines regulating judicial review in foreign relations cases. Where relevant, current events will be explored, such as ongoing controversies regarding individual rights during wartime, the post-September 11 war on terrorism, and the Iraq war. Grades will be based on a final examination.
Autumn 2014
Daniel Abebe
Workshop: International Law
LAWS 63412
This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of current scholarship in international law. The workshop will meet four times per quarter for ninety minutes. Three of the workshop sessions each quarter will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by legal scholars and social scientists. The workshop will give students insight into cutting-edge research on why states form international agreements, and whether those agreements change state behavior. These sessions will occur roughly every other week. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits.
Autumn 2014
Daniel Abebe, Tom Ginsburg, Eric Posner, Adam Chilton
Canonical Ideas in Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will write short reaction papers on the readings, and each student will once during the term facilitate the class discussion of an article, drawing on their outside research to do so. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students are expected to produce papers of publishable quality because the seminar’s ultimate goal is to prepare students for the process of entering the legal academy. Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on the reaction papers, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Abebe, Malani, and Masur a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 21, 2014.
Winter 2015
Daniel Abebe, Anup Malani, Jonathan Masur
Workshop: International Law
LAWS 63412
This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of current scholarship in international law. The workshop will meet four times per quarter for ninety minutes. Three of the workshop sessions each quarter will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by legal scholars and social scientists. The workshop will give students insight into cutting-edge research on why states form international agreements, and whether those agreements change state behavior. These sessions will occur roughly every other week. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits.
Winter 2015
Daniel Abebe, Tom Ginsburg, Eric Posner, Adam Chilton
Canonical Ideas in Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will write short reaction papers on the readings, and each student will once during the term facilitate the class discussion of an article, drawing on their outside research to do so. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students are expected to produce papers of publishable quality because the seminar’s ultimate goal is to prepare students for the process of entering the legal academy. Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on the reaction papers, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Abebe, Malani, and Masur a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 21, 2014.
Spring 2015
Daniel Abebe, Anup Malani, Jonathan Masur
Conflict of Laws
LAWS 41501
This course will examine the legal framework for the resolution of interstate conflict of laws within the U.S., focusing on the choice of law principles that courts apply to determine the rule of decision in cases where the relevant parties, conduct or transactions have connections to more than one state. The course will consider how conflict of laws rules implicate important separation of powers, federalism and private international law concerns. Topics include the federal constitutional limitations on choice of law, the extent to which courts must give full faith and credit to the judgments of courts in other states, and the role of international conflict of laws rules on the domestic enforcement of foreign judgments. The student's grade will be based on a final examination.
Spring 2015
Daniel Abebe
Workshop: International Law
LAWS 63412
This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of current scholarship in international law. The workshop will meet four times per quarter for ninety minutes. Three of the workshop sessions each quarter will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by legal scholars and social scientists. The workshop will give students insight into cutting-edge research on why states form international agreements, and whether those agreements change state behavior. These sessions will occur roughly every other week. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits.
Spring 2015
Daniel Abebe, Tom Ginsburg, Eric Posner, Adam Chilton