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William H. J. Hubbard : Courses and Seminars

Canonical Ideas in American Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
(++, A, WP, SEM)This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will have short research and writing assignments on the readings. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on their short writing assignments, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Hubbard and Stephanopoulos a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 26, 2016.
Autumn 2016
Nicholas Stephanopoulos, William H. J. Hubbard
Civil Procedure I
LAWS 30211
(1L)Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties.The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
Autumn 2016
William H. J. Hubbard
Workshop: Law and Economics
LAWS 66012
(A, WP, BID, SEM)This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor.This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas.There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
Autumn 2016
Omri Ben-Shahar, William H. J. Hubbard
Advanced Civil Procedure
LAWS 43208
(CORE)This course examines salient features of major civil litigation from both a practitioner's and a policymaker's perspective. Broadly, these features fall into two categories: issues with forum and aggregation on the one hand, and problems with the collection and production of evidence on the other. Topics in the first category include class actions and arbitration. Topics in the second category include electronic discovery, expert witnesses, and preservation of evidence. In addition, this course studies how the federal rulemaking process, statutes, and judicial decisions compete to define the procedures that govern civil litigation. The student's grade is based on a final examination with limited consideration of class participation.
Spring 2017
William H. J. Hubbard
Canonical Ideas in American Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
(++, A, WP, SEM)This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will have short research and writing assignments on the readings. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on their short writing assignments, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Hubbard and Stephanopoulos a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 26, 2016.
Spring 2017
Nicholas Stephanopoulos, William H. J. Hubbard
Civil Procedure II
LAWS 30221
(1L)Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties.The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
Spring 2017
William H. J. Hubbard
Workshop: Law and Economics
LAWS 66012
(A, WP, SEM)This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor.This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas.There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
Spring 2017
Omri Ben-Shahar, William H. J. Hubbard
Canonical Ideas in American Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
(++, A, WP, SEM)This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will have short research and writing assignments on the readings. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on their short writing assignments, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Hubbard and Stephanopoulos a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 26, 2016.
Winter 2017
Nicholas Stephanopoulos, William H. J. Hubbard
Workshop: Law and Economics
LAWS 66012
(A, WP, SEM)This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor.This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas.There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
Winter 2017
Omri Ben-Shahar, William H. J. Hubbard