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Xin Dai : Courses and Seminars

Chinese for Business Lawyers
LAWS 98004
This class aims to help students improve their practical communication skills in Chinese language in the business law context. The instructor will provide background information about several areas of cross-border business law practices in China, including commercial contracts, corporate transactions, securities regulation, intellectual property, FCPA and commercial dispute resolution. Students are expected to practice before and in class their Chinese language skills through discussing the relevant legal topics and completing several small reading, speaking and writing tasks. Students interested in practicing China-related business law in international law firms or other business organizations may find the class useful. Classroom instruction and discussion as well as reading materials are expected to be in Chinese language. English interpretation will be provided from time to time as the instructor may determine necessary. Other adjustments to course materials are also possible based on the enrolled students’ general proficiency in Chinese. The instructor encourages interested students to discuss expected language proficiency in advance. Students will receive one credit based on completion of multiple small exercises in class and one final written project in Chinese (500 Chinese characters or more). The class meets once a week and the students will receive pass/fail grades.
Winter 2014
Xin Dai
Chinese for Lawyers
LAWS 98003
This class offers an introduction to the legal environment of the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC”) and basic concepts and terminology of Chinese law. Although not designed as a comprehensive survey, the class will cover a list of topics, the general knowledge of which may serve as good basis for the students’ further studies in Chinese law. Students interested in China-related law practice/working opportunities in the Greater China region may also find the class useful as it aims to improve the students’ language and communication skills in legal settings. Both classroom instruction and reading material are expected to be in Chinese. English interpretation will be provided from time to time as the instructor may determine necessary during the course of instruction. Other adjustments to course material are also possible based on the enrolled students’ general proficiency in Chinese. The instructor encourages interested students to discuss expected language proficiency in advance. Students will be graded based on three short writing assignments in Chinese (500 Chinese characters or more).
Autumn 2013
Xin Dai