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Brian Citro : Courses and Seminars

International Human Rights Clinic
LAWS 67913
The International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC) works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the U.S. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, drafting reports, and training manuals. Working in teams on active human rights cases and projects, students will develop and hone their international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to also enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Students are also encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects during the break periods. Students in their first quarter of IHRC must enroll for 2-3 credits; students can enroll in the IHRC for 1-3 credits in subsequent quarters, in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses.
Autumn 2015
Brian Citro, Claudia Flores
International Human Rights Law and Advocacy
LAWS 96205
This seminar considers major issues in international human rights law and advocacy. It is designed to introduce students to the promotion and protection of human rights through context-driven advocacy mechanisms and strategies. The seminar will provide an introduction to the history of human rights principles and movements, the development of international human rights norms, and an overview of the international, regional and national institutions that develop, interpret and enforce these norms. The remainder of the seminar will evaluate human rights advocacy tools and strategies applied in various political, social and economic contexts. Through case studies and simulated human rights research and advocacy projects, students will develop the skills to conduct international human rights work, including: performing situational assessments; designing and executing field-work and fact-gathering; report writing; interviewing witnesses and victims of abuses; assessing various litigation and non-litigation strategies; conducting effective legal research using diverse sources; developing cross-cultural and context-driven analysis and advocacy skills; and learning to effectively and realistically evaluate achievements and challenges. Class discussions and readings will expose students to critical perspectives on the international human rights regime, as well as current research methodologies and technologies used to monitor and promote human rights.
Autumn 2015
Brian Citro, Claudia Flores
International Human Rights Clinic
LAWS 67913
The International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC) works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the U.S. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, drafting reports, and training manuals. Working in teams on active human rights cases and projects, students will develop and hone their international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to also enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Students are also encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects during the break periods. Students in their first quarter of IHRC must enroll for 2-3 credits; students can enroll in the IHRC for 1-3 credits in subsequent quarters, in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses.
Winter 2016
Brian Citro, Claudia Flores
International Human Rights Clinic
LAWS 67913
The International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC) works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the U.S. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, drafting reports, and training manuals. Working in teams on active human rights cases and projects, students will develop and hone their international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to also enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Students are also encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects during the break periods. Students in their first quarter of IHRC must enroll for 2-3 credits; students can enroll in the IHRC for 1-3 credits in subsequent quarters, in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses.
Spring 2016
Brian Citro, Claudia Flores