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John Rappaport : Courses and Seminars

Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities
LAWS 95902
We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2015
John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory
LAWS 63402
Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to post questions to the online discussion board.
Autumn 2015
Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan Masur, John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Laura Weinrib
Criminal Procedure I: The Investigative Process
LAWS 47201
This course focuses on the law regulating the investigatory process, including searches, seizures, and confessions. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
Winter 2016
John Rappaport
Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities
LAWS 95902
We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2016
John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
What Causes Crime?
LAWS 42642
In this interdisciplinary seminar, students will read literature from allied fields including economics, criminology, sociology, psychology, and history in an attempt to understand what causes and reduces crime on both an individual and societal level. In addition to tackling this substantive question, we will discuss how the approaches of these academic disciplines differ and what each has to offer. The grade is based on class attendance and participation, including a series of short written submissions responding to the readings. Students may earn a third credit by writing a 15-page research paper in addition to the rest of the coursework.
Winter 2016
John Rappaport
Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory
LAWS 63402
Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to post questions to the online discussion board.
Winter 2016
Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan Masur, John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Laura Weinrib
Evidence
LAWS 41601
This course examines the law governing proof of disputed propositions of fact in criminal and civil trials, including relevance, character evidence, the hearsay "rule" and other rules of exclusion, and examination and privileges of witnesses. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
Spring 2016
John Rappaport
Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities
LAWS 95902
We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
Spring 2016
John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory
LAWS 63402
Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to post questions to the online discussion board. Meets from 3:30 to 4:45 on Tuesdays, typically alternating with the Law & Economics Workshop.
Spring 2016
Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan Masur, John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Laura Weinrib