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Adam Chilton : Courses and Seminars

Greenberg Seminar: Wrongful Convictions
LAWS 92000
(A)In recent years, investigative journalists, legal activists, and documentary filmmakers have highlighted the shortcomings of the American criminal justice system by giving wrongful convictions widespread public awareness. In this Greenberg seminar, we will watch documentary films on wrongful convictions and discuss the elements of the criminal justice system that make these mistakes possible. We will specifically explore many of the drivers of wrongful convictions, including racism, prosecutorial misconduct, and the limits of forensic evidence. We will also discuss how wrongful convictions are portrayed in the media and why they gain such widespread public interest.
Spring 2017
Adam Chilton, John Rappaport
Greenberg Seminar: Wrongful Convictions
LAWS 92000
(A)In recent years, investigative journalists, legal activists, and documentary filmmakers have highlighted the shortcomings of the American criminal justice system by giving wrongful convictions widespread public awareness. In this Greenberg seminar, we will watch documentary films on wrongful convictions and discuss the elements of the criminal justice system that make these mistakes possible. We will specifically explore many of the drivers of wrongful convictions, including racism, prosecutorial misconduct, and the limits of forensic evidence. We will also discuss how wrongful convictions are portrayed in the media and why they gain such widespread public interest.
Winter 2017
Adam Chilton, John Rappaport
Greenberg Seminar: Wrongful Convictions
LAWS 92000
(A, BID)In recent years, investigative journalists, legal activists, and documentary filmmakers have highlighted the shortcomings of the American criminal justice system by giving wrongful convictions widespread public awareness. In this Greenberg seminar, we will watch documentary films on wrongful convictions and discuss the elements of the criminal justice system that make these mistakes possible. We will specifically explore many of the drivers of wrongful convictions, including racism, prosecutorial misconduct, and the limits of forensic evidence. We will also discuss how wrongful convictions are portrayed in the media and why they gain such widespread public interest.
Autumn 2016
Adam Chilton, John Rappaport
Hinton Moot Court Competition
LAWS 95020
The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round.The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judge the semi-final arguments and select the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy.The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup.Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
Winter 2017
Adam Chilton
Immigration Law
LAWS 43200
(CORE)This course explores the U.S. immigration system. The course will focus on the federal laws and policies that regulate the admission and exclusion of immigrants. Topics covered will include: the visa system, deportation and removal, the law of asylum, the role of the states in regulating migrants, and proposed reforms to the immigration system. The course will also consider how immigration law connects to both constitutional law and foreign policy.
Spring 2017
Adam Chilton
Immigration Policy
LAWS 53333
(BID, CORE, SEM)This seminar will explore immigration policy in the United States and other countries around the world. The seminar will specifically focus on examining which policies are effective and potential reforms to existing policies that are failing. The seminar will explore topics including the financial consequences of immigration, the impacts of efforts to police immigration, the consequences of guest worker programs, and the determinants of public opinion on immigration policy. Specific attention will be given to studying immigration policy in a comparative context.
Spring 2017
Adam Chilton
Torts
LAWS 30611
(1L, A)The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence.
Winter 2017
Adam Chilton