View All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T V W Y Z

Anthony Casey : Courses and Seminars

Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary
LAWS 95902
There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
Autumn 2014
Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
Bankruptcy and Reorganization: The Federal Bankruptcy Code
LAWS 73601
This course studies the Federal Bankruptcy Code and the law of corporate reorganization. Topics include the rights of creditors in bankruptcy, the relationship between bankruptcy law and state law, the treatment of executory contracts, bankruptcy planning, the restructuring of corporations in Chapter 11, and the procedure for confirming plans of reorganization. There are no prerequisites for this course. Booth students do not require instructor consent in order to submit a registration request. The student's grade will be based on a final examination.
Winter 2015
Anthony Casey
Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary
LAWS 95902
There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
Winter 2015
Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
Civil Procedure II
LAWS 30221
Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
Spring 2015
Anthony Casey
Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary
LAWS 95902
There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
Spring 2015
Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
Litigating Financial Disputes
LAWS 52523
This seminar will explore the practice, theory, and strategy of litigating financial disputes. These disputes include bankruptcy proceedings, shareholder derivative suits, securities fraud cases, white collar investigations, and suits alleging the breach of financial contracts. On the practical side, the seminar will explore the procedures for choosing and preparing financial experts to testify on valuation and other issues, interviewing and deposing executive officers and investment bankers, and common discovery issues that arise. On the theoretical side, we will explore critiques of the current systems of litigating these disputes and proposals for reform. In all areas, we will consider the strategic implications that lawyers must take into account both in litigating the disputes and in negotiating agreements in ways to avoid future disputes or reduce the risk of losing a dispute if one arises. In general, we will explore the overlap between litigation and transactional work that is at the heart of these disputes. For example, we will look at cases where litigation positions are used to facilitate leverage in transactions. The seminar materials will be a mix of court opinions, pleadings filed in actual cases, transactional documents, and academic articles. The grade is based on a series of short research papers or a final written paper.
Spring 2015
Anthony Casey