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Nicholas Stephanopoulos : Courses and Seminars

Greenberg Seminar: Redistribution in America and Abroad
LAWS 95902
The redistribution of resources is perhaps the most important -- and controversial -- task of government. In this seminar, we will consider redistribution both in America and abroad. The following are some of the issues we will examine: What circumstances prompt governments around the world to engage in redistribution? Is redistribution an effective or feasible response to rising inequality? What are the economic costs and benefits of redistribution? How do the affluent prevent greater redistribution in democracies given their relatively small numbers? The materials we will cover include works by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Lawrence Lessig, and Thomas Piketty.
Autumn 2014
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Administrative Law
LAWS 46101
This course examines the structure of the administrative state, its relations to the other branches of government and private citizens, and the constitutional, statutory, and common law rules that govern the substance and procedure of administration action and inaction. The course focuses on some constitutional topics, including the non-delegation doctrine, presidential control over administrative agencies, and the delegation of adjudicative authority to non-Article III officers. Substantial attention is given to the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and other statutory requirements for lawful agency action. Covered topics include the proper role of agencies in interpreting statutory and regulatory law; judicial review of agency decisions; public participation in agency rulemaking; and non-traditional approaches to regulation, including negotiation and privatization. A central theme of the course is how the law manages the tension between rule of law values (e.g., procedural regularity, accountability, and substantive limits on arbitrary action) and the desire for flexible, effective administrative governance. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
Winter 2015
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Election Law
LAWS 95903
This course examines the law, both constitutional and statutory, that governs the American electoral system. Topics covered include the right to vote, reapportionment and redistricting, minority representation, the regulation of political parties, and campaign finance. The course draws heavily from both legal and political science scholarship. It addresses constitutional provisions including the First, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments, as well as key statutes such as the Voting Rights Act, the Federal Election Campaign Act, and the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act. Students will develop an understanding of not only election law doctrine, but also the theoretical and functional underpinnings of the American electoral system.
Winter 2015
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Greenberg Seminar: Redistribution in America and Abroad
LAWS 95902
The redistribution of resources is perhaps the most important -- and controversial -- task of government. In this seminar, we will consider redistribution both in America and abroad. The following are some of the issues we will examine: What circumstances prompt governments around the world to engage in redistribution? Is redistribution an effective or feasible response to rising inequality? What are the economic costs and benefits of redistribution? How do the affluent prevent greater redistribution in democracies given their relatively small numbers? The materials we will cover include works by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Lawrence Lessig, and Thomas Piketty.
Winter 2015
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Public Opinion, Public Policy, and the Law
LAWS 69002
This seminar will explore the intersection of public opinion, public policy, and the law. To date, questions about whether and how public opinion influences public policy have been addressed primarily by political scientists. But these questions are also vital to several legal domains, in particular constitutional law and election law. In the constitutional law context, the mistranslation of public opinion into public policy may be evidence of a political malfunction that requires judicial intervention. In the election law context, one of the most important functions of elections is to align the preferences of the electorate with the policies enacted by their representatives. The seminar will tackle these complex and interesting issues through readings drawn from legal scholarship, political theory, and empirical political science. An effort will also be made to have outside speakers present papers once or twice during the quarter.
Winter 2015
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Greenberg Seminar: Redistribution in America and Abroad
LAWS 95902
The redistribution of resources is perhaps the most important -- and controversial -- task of government. In this seminar, we will consider redistribution both in America and abroad. The following are some of the issues we will examine: What circumstances prompt governments around the world to engage in redistribution? Is redistribution an effective or feasible response to rising inequality? What are the economic costs and benefits of redistribution? How do the affluent prevent greater redistribution in democracies given their relatively small numbers? The materials we will cover include works by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Lawrence Lessig, and Thomas Piketty.
Spring 2015
Nicholas Stephanopoulos