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Nicholas Stephanopoulos : Courses and Seminars

Administrative Law
LAWS 46101
(BID, CORE) This course examines the structure of the administrative state, its relations to the other branches of government and private citizens, and the constitutional, statutory, and common law rules that govern the substance and procedure of administration action and inaction. The course focuses on some constitutional topics, including the non-delegation doctrine, presidential control over administrative agencies, and the delegation of adjudicative authority to non-Article III officers. Substantial attention is given to the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and other statutory requirements for lawful agency action. Covered topics include the proper role of agencies in interpreting statutory and regulatory law; judicial review of agency decisions; public participation in agency rulemaking; and non-traditional approaches to regulation, including negotiation and privatization. A central theme of the course is how the law manages the tension between rule of law values (e.g., procedural regularity, accountability, and substantive limits on arbitrary action) and the desire for flexible, effective administrative governance. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
Autumn 2016
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Canonical Ideas in American Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
(++, A, WP, SEM)This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will have short research and writing assignments on the readings. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on their short writing assignments, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Hubbard and Stephanopoulos a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 26, 2016.
Autumn 2016
Nicholas Stephanopoulos, William H. J. Hubbard
Greenberg Seminars: The 2016 Campaign
LAWS 92000
(A, BID)This seminar will examine the 2016 campaign through the prisms of election law and political science. On the legal side, the seminar will consider the changing role of money in politics, parties' ability to control their primaries, and the impact of partisan gerrymandering on legislative races. On the political science side, the seminar will ask whether (and how) campaigns can influence voter turnout and election outcomes. The seminar's sessions will be front-loaded so that more of them take place prior to Election day.
Autumn 2016
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Canonical Ideas in American Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
(++, A, WP, SEM)This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will have short research and writing assignments on the readings. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on their short writing assignments, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Hubbard and Stephanopoulos a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 26, 2016.
Spring 2017
Nicholas Stephanopoulos, William H. J. Hubbard
Election Law
LAWS 43260
(CORE)This course examines the law, both constitutional and statutory, that governs the American electoral system. Topics covered include the right to vote, reapportionment and redistricting, minority representation, the regulation of political parties, and campaign finance. The course draws heavily from both legal and political science scholarship. It addresses constitutional provisions including the First, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments, as well as key statutes such as the Voting Rights Act, the Federal Election Campaign Act, and the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act. Students will develop an understanding of not only election law doctrine, but also the theoretical and functional underpinnings of the American electoral system.
Spring 2017
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Greenberg Seminars: The 2016 Campaign
LAWS 92000
(A, BID)This seminar will examine the 2016 campaign through the prisms of election law and political science. On the legal side, the seminar will consider the changing role of money in politics, parties' ability to control their primaries, and the impact of partisan gerrymandering on legislative races. On the political science side, the seminar will ask whether (and how) campaigns can influence voter turnout and election outcomes. The seminar's sessions will be front-loaded so that more of them take place prior to Election day.
Spring 2016
Nicholas Stephanopoulos
Canonical Ideas in American Legal Thought
LAWS 57013
(++, A, WP, SEM)This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will have short research and writing assignments on the readings. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on their short writing assignments, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Hubbard and Stephanopoulos a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 26, 2016.
Winter 2017
Nicholas Stephanopoulos, William H. J. Hubbard
Greenberg Seminars: The 2016 Campaign
LAWS 92000
(A, BID)This seminar will examine the 2016 campaign through the prisms of election law and political science. On the legal side, the seminar will consider the changing role of money in politics, parties' ability to control their primaries, and the impact of partisan gerrymandering on legislative races. On the political science side, the seminar will ask whether (and how) campaigns can influence voter turnout and election outcomes. The seminar's sessions will be front-loaded so that more of them take place prior to Election day.
Winter 2016
Nicholas Stephanopoulos