News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Thomas Drueke, Faculty Services and Scholarly Communications Librarian http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/04/22/thomas-drueke-faculty-services-and-scholarly-communications-librarian/ The D&#8217;Angelo Law Library welcomes Thomas Drueke, our new Faculty Services and Scholarly Communications Librarian.  Many of you will recognize Thomas &#8211; he has spent the last 2 years working the Circulation Desk nights and weekends while finishing his Masters &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/04/22/thomas-drueke-faculty-services-and-scholarly-communications-librarian/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 21:46:58 +0000 Margaret Schilt http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=24149 Eric Posner on Russia and US Bank Sanctions http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty/~3/pegFkLtQDGY/eric-posner-on-russia-and-us-bank-sanctions.html <p>On his blog, Posner gets input from a colleague on <a href="http://ericposner.com/can-russia-oppose-u-s-bank-sanctions-through-the-wto/" target="_self">whether Russia can oppose U.S. bank sanctions through the WTO</a>.</p><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:gIN9vFwOqvQ"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:gIN9vFwOqvQ" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:dnMXMwOfBR0"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=dnMXMwOfBR0" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:l6gmwiTKsz0"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=l6gmwiTKsz0" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty/~4/pegFkLtQDGY" height="1" width="1"/> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:31:18 +0000 UChicagoLaw tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00d8341c031153ef01a3fcf47982970b Mike Hilgers '04 Running for Nebraska Attorney General http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/mike-hilgers-04-running-nebraska-attorney-general <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/statehouse/six-vying-to-replace-bruning-as-attorney-general/article_99f69b99-8642-5892-a6a4-1ccd3adaef27.html" title="http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/statehouse/six-vying-to-replace-bruning-as-attorney-general/article_99f69b99-8642-5892-a6a4-1ccd3adaef27.html">http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/statehouse/six-vying-to-r...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>From the <em>Lincoln Journal-Star</em>:</p> <blockquote><p>In the most wide-open race for attorney general in recent memory, six people are vying to become Nebraska's next top law enforcement officer.</p> <p>The candidates seeking to succeed Republican Attorney General Jon Bruning, who is&nbsp;running for governor, are Republicans Doug Peterson, Pete Pirsch, Brian Buescher and Mike Hilgers and Democrats Allan Eurek and Janet Stewart.</p> <p>Here's a round-up of their positions, mostly pulled from answers to the Journal Star Voter's Guide questionnaire...</p> <p><strong>Mike Hilgers,</strong>&nbsp;34, is a founding partner of Gober Hilgers, a law firm with offices in Nebraska, Dallas, Austin, Texas, and Washington, D.C. He ran unsuccessfully for the Legislature in 2012.</p> <p>"I am running to help restore the rule of law," Hilgers said. "The attorney general is one of the last lines of defense against the intrusion of unelected bureaucrats in Washington, D.C. I will lead that fight. I am also running to ensure that our county attorneys, sheriffs and troopers have the resources they need to keep our communities safe."</p> </blockquote> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:42:31 +0000 arester 21515 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Congressman Michael Quigley on MSM Blood Donation Ban http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/congressman-michael-quigley-msm-blood-donation-ban <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/145802149&amp;color=800000&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Congressman Michael Quigley is a graduate of the Harris School of Policy. He is the Congressman for Illinois's 5th District. Con. Quigley is outspoken against the FDA's ban against blood donation and will be at the law school to share his stance and answer questions from the audience.</p> <p>This talk was recorded on March 31, 2014, and was sponsored by Outlaw, the Food Law Society, Law School Democrats, ACS, &amp; ACLU.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-event"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Event listing:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/events/2014-03-31-outlaw-food-law-society-law-school-democrats-acs-aclu-present-congressman-michael-">Outlaw, Food Law Society, Law School Democrats, ACS, &amp; ACLU present Congressman Michael Quigley on MSM Blood Donation Ban</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related article:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/news/lgbt-week-focuses-%E2%80%9Cfringe%E2%80%9D">LGBT Week Focuses on the “Fringe” </a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:39:21 +0000 arester 21504 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Foreign Sovereign Immunity and Comparative Institutional Competence http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/adam-chilton-foreign-sovereign-immunity-and-comparative-institutional-competence <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Screen%20Shot%202013-09-19%20at%2010.29.41%20AM.png </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Adam Chilton </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-nonfacauth"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> with:&nbsp;</div> Christopher A. Whytock </div> </div> </div> <p>Policymakers and legal scholars routinely make comparative institutional competence claims — claims that one branch of government is better at performing a specified function than another, and that the more competent branch should be in charge of that function. Such claims pervade American law and policy; but they are rarely evaluated with rigor.</p> <p>We take advantage of an unusual legislative experiment to conduct what we believe to be the first systematic empirical analysis of the comparative institutional competence of the executive branch and the judiciary in a critical field of American law and policy: U.S. foreign relations. From 1952 to 1976, the U.S. State Department decided whether foreign nations would receive sovereign immunity from suits in U.S. courts. Based on the perception that the State Department’s immunity decisions were too influenced by political considerations, Congress passed the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act of 1976 (the “FSIA”), which transferred immunity decisionmaking to the judiciary. This transfer was based on an explicit comparative institutional competence claim: that the courts are better able than the State Department to make immunity decisions based on law rather than politics.</p> <p>To evaluate this claim, we created and analyzed an extensive dataset of foreign sovereign immunity decisions made by the State Department and the United States District Courts over the last fifty years. Our principal findings are threefold. First, we find no evidence that political factors systematically influenced the State Department’s immunity decisions. Second, there is strong evidence that political factors have systematically influenced the courts’ decisions. Third, the transfer of immunity decisionmaking to the courts did not significantly affect the likelihood of immunity.</p> <p>All three findings challenge both the FSIA’s underlying comparative institutional competence claims and more general conventional understandings about the proper allocation of authority between the executive and judicial branches. To be sure, there may be valid reasons for the judiciary to play a leading role in immunity decisionmaking, and possibly other areas of U.S. foreign relations as well. But our analysis casts doubt on the widely made comparative institutional competence claim that the judicial branch is necessarily better equipped than the executive branch at making decisions free from systematic political influence.</p> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 16:17:13 +0000 arester 21494 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Geof Stone, "Politics, the Constitution and the Roberts Court" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/geof-stone-politics-constitution-and-roberts-court <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Politics, the Constitution and the Roberts Court </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Huffington Post </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 20, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>When I was a law student at the University of Chicago in the late 1960s, I had the great privilege as having Philip Kurland as one of my constitutional law professors. Kurland was one of the most distinguished constitutional scholars of his generation. He was also, by the standards of the day, quite conservative, and often a sharp critic of the Warren Court.</p> <p>In 1970, Kurland published a much-heralded book,&nbsp;<em>Politics, the Constitution and the Warren Court</em>, in which he laid out his critique of the Supreme Court's work under the leadership of Earl Warren. A former law clerk to Justice Felix Frankfurter, Kurland echoed many of Frankfurter's views about the need for judicial restraint.</p> <p>Frankfurter himself came to be suspicious of judicial "activism" in the early years of the 20th century when a clique of conservative Supreme Court justices took an aggressively "activist" approach to constitutional interpretation in a campaign to declare unconstitutional a broad range of progressive legislation -- including, for example, laws guaranteeing a minimum wage, establishing maximum working hours, prohibiting child labor and regulating the working conditions for women. The lesson Frankfurter drew from this era was that Supreme Court justices should be cautious in interpreting the Constitution, lest they fall victim to the temptation to impose their own personal values on the nation in the guise of interpreting the Constitution.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/politics-the-constitution_b_5180627.html" title="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/politics-the-constitution_b_5180627.html">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/politics-the-constitution...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-g">Geoffrey R. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 15:04:49 +0000 arester 21493 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Evidentiary Privileges in International Arbitration http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/tom-ginsburg-evidentiary-privileges-international-arbitration <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/GinsburgThomas.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Tom Ginsburg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-nonfacauth"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> with:&nbsp;</div> Richard M. Mosk </div> </div> </div> <p>Evidentiary rules employed in judicial proceedings are not strictly applied in international arbitration. Although this flexibility with regard to evidentiary matters is often considered a benefit of international arbitration, in certain situations it can lead to unpredictability and conflicts with national law. One such area is the application of evidentiary and testimonial privileges in international arbitration. There is very little authority addressing how international arbitrators should proceed when presented with a claim of privilege.</p> Fri, 18 Apr 2014 21:36:28 +0000 arester 21398 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu George Dawson '69 Named University of Florida Levin College of Law's Professor of the Year http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/george-dawson-69-named-university-florida-levin-college-laws-profess <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="https://www.law.ufl.edu/flalaw/2014/04/law-students-pick-incoming-dean-as-professor-of-the-year/" title="https://www.law.ufl.edu/flalaw/2014/04/law-students-pick-incoming-dean-as-professor-of-the-year/">https://www.law.ufl.edu/flalaw/2014/04/law-students-pick-incoming-dean-a...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>From the UF website:</p> <blockquote><p>UF Law’s largest student group has voted Professor George Dawson, the law school’s incoming interim dean, as Levin College of Law’s Professor of the Year.</p> <p>The 400-member John Marshall Bar Association announced Wednesday that it chose Dawson for the honor thanks to his clear explanation of law cases and consistent attention to student needs.</p> <p>“I just found he was the most engaging professor,” said Alisha Feldman, the group’s public relations director who took Dawson for her first-year contracts course. “Somehow the way he taught wasn’t so scary, but he really ingrained the information in our heads, the way he talked through cases.”</p> <p>Dawson, who is traveling in Vienna, Austria, this week with the International Commercial Arbitration Moot team, has been popular among UF Law students for years. It’s the fourth time he has been chosen as professor of the year.</p> </blockquote> <p><a href="https://www.law.ufl.edu/flalaw/2014/04/law-students-pick-incoming-dean-as-professor-of-the-year/">Read the rest of the article.</a></p> Fri, 18 Apr 2014 21:14:25 +0000 arester 21393 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu End-of-Week Blog Roundup http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty/~3/x5z7wT-XIn4/end-of-week-blog-roundup.html <p>Eric Posner discusses <a href="http://ericposner.com/dignity-as-a-value-in-cost-benefit-analysis-by-rachel-bayefsky/" target="_self">dignity as a value in cost-benefit analysis</a> and <a href="http://ericposner.com/russian-stock-prices-jan-apr-2014/" target="_self">recent Russian stock prices</a>; Brian Leiter <a href="http://leiterlawschool.typepad.com/leiter/2014/04/signs-of-the-times-oregon-edition.html" target="_self">discusses</a> a dispute over faculty pay at Oregon; and Will Baude has <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2014/04/17/further-reading-on-the-problem-of-dishonest-law-enforcement-agents/" target="_self">two</a> <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2014/04/18/judges-weigh-in-on-credibility-findings-for-law-enforcement/" target="_self">posts</a> on the credibility of law enforcement officials and <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2014/04/17/hugo-black-and-norm-pattis-on-bravery-sacrifice-and-the-legal-profession/" target="_self">one</a> on Hugo Black's dissent in the case of George Anastaplo '51.</p><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:gIN9vFwOqvQ"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:gIN9vFwOqvQ" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:dnMXMwOfBR0"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=dnMXMwOfBR0" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:l6gmwiTKsz0"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=l6gmwiTKsz0" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=x5z7wT-XIn4:vuhD6MOy9H0:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty/~4/x5z7wT-XIn4" height="1" width="1"/> Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:54:46 +0000 UChicagoLaw tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00d8341c031153ef01a73dadb666970d Ambassador’s Life, Gifts Inspire Service http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/magazine/spring14/hormel <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A substantial gift from James C. Hormel, ’58, will provide a three&shy;-year full-&shy;tuition scholarship each year to an entering student who has demonstrated a commitment to public service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A substantial gift from James C. Hormel, ’58, will provide a three&shy;-year full-&shy;tuition scholarship each year to an entering student who has demonstrated a commitment to public service.</p> <p>Mr. Hormel’s commitment to supporting Law School students and graduates working for the public interest began with a 1986 gift that he has generously supplemented in subsequent years to create the foundation for many of the substantial forms of financial support that the Law School offers today.</p> <p>“Even back in 1986,” Hormel says, “it was clear that debt burdens were deterring some graduates from pursuing public service jobs and careers. Today the financial challenge is considerably more severe, even as our country needs more of its brightest lawyers to apply their talents for the public good.”</p> <p>Hormel’s own record of service is exemplary. He was US ambassador to Luxembourg, and he served on two United Nations delegations. He is a founding board member of Human Rights Campaign, the largest civil rights organization working to achieve equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans, and he financed the Gay and Lesbian Center at the San Francisco Public Library, which includes the world’s largest collection of LGBT materials. He has established a faculty chair in social justice at his college alma mater, Swarthmore, and has been a member of Swarthmore’s board of managers almost continuously since 1988. He also serves on five other nonprofit boards and is one of only four people to have received a lifetime appointment to the Law School’s Visiting Committee.</p> <p>His 1999 appointment as ambassador to Luxembourg capped Hormel’s five&shy;year quest, against fierce opposition, to become the first openly gay US ambassador. He says that he realized when he was sworn in to his position that he was the highest&shy;ranking openly gay official in the US government. “That was a big moment,” he has said, “not just for me but for a whole constituency that had been held back for all of our history.” His 2011 memoir, <em>Fit to Serve</em>, describes both the political struggle to attain that ambassadorship and his personal struggles to acknowledge, come to terms with, and eventually declare his sexual orientation.</p> <p>From 1961 to 1967, he served as the Law School’s first full&shy;time dean of students and director of admissions. He recalls his experiences at the Law School fondly: “As a student, I received a rigorous, challenging, and inspiring education from a magnificent faculty. That education has served me well in all that I have done. I loved my time at the Law School, and when Dean Levi invited me to return as dean of students, it was like being readmitted to paradise.”</p> <p>As admissions director, he worked to increase the representation of women and people of color at the Law School. Regarding LGBT issues, he says, “It might have benefited more students if I had been openly gay then, but I had spent my life trying not to be gay, and I still had not really recognized sexual orientation as a legitimate equality issue. Maybe it’s worth remembering that I was living in a world in which it was difficult for anyone who was gay to imagine there wasn’t something wrong with them.”</p> <p>By the end of his tenure as dean, he says, “I had gone from being a model husband and father to a divorcé; from a Republican to a very left&shy;wing Democrat; and from a timid person to someone on the verge of taking charge of his life.” He moved to New York, then to Hawai’i, increasing his self-&shy;assurance and deepening his political convictions as the years passed.</p> <p>In 1977, he settled in San Francisco, where he founded his investment and philanthropy company, Equidex, and where he lives today with his life partner Michael Nguyen. He enjoys warm relationships with his former wife and their five children, fourteen grandchildren, and seven great&shy;grandchildren.</p> <p>“I wrote my book primarily to help all people, not just those who are gay, recognize that they have the power within them to make a difference in this world,” he says. “I hope that these new Hormel Scholarships, along with the other aid the Law School offers, will help more people to make a positive difference through public service.”</p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/hormel.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=53051"&g