News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Law Student Drive Keeps Blood on Campus http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/law-student-drive-keeps-blood-campus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 4, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A grassroots effort to bring a blood drive to the Law School had an important mission: keep the donated blood in the community.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In between his Commercial Law and Environmental Law classes last week, Alex Gross, ’16, swung into the lobby of the Kane Center, took his place on the waiting gurney, and held out his arm. The blood donation that followed was quick, easy, and fairly ordinary.</p> <p>Except for this: His donation was part of a student-led drive to send blood directly to the University of Chicago Medicine Blood Bank instead of a third party organization — a move that reduces costs, guarantees that the blood will remain in the community, and offers students a chance to do good by partnering with another part of campus.</p> <p><img style="float: left; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/paul-crane-edited-web.jpg" alt="Lecturer Paul Crane, a Bigelow Teaching Fellow, donates blood." width="250" height="373" />“We’re keeping everything in-house,” said Clara Kim, ’15, one of the student organizers. “Many of the patients who receive blood at the UChicago hospitals are residents of the South Side. If we can make it easier for the hospital to get the resources they need, then we’re helping our own community.”</p> <p>Less than 5 percent of blood products used in the Medical Center are obtained through blood donations made there; much of the rest comes at a cost from suppliers like the American Red Cross, Lifesource, and Heartland. But the Blood Bank is working to change that, both through campus and community drives and by encouraging people to <a href="http://www.uchospitals.edu/visitor/for-patients/guide/donate-blood.html"><span style="color: #0563c1;">visit the Medical Center’s Blood Donation Center</span></a> at 5758 South Maryland Avenue (Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine, DCAM room 2E), as some Law School students already do.</p> <p>“In the past, other blood centers in the area have come and collected blood from our students, taking it either to other medical centers or bringing it back to us at an increased cost,” said Dr. Geoffrey Wool, a transfusion medicine fellow at the University’s Department of Pathology. “We want to keep the blood right here at home. People who donate can feel a more direct connection with the patients that we help, which really brings home the benefit of donating.”<span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"> </span></p> <p>The Law School drive started with John Moynihan and Andrew Adair, both ’15, who have been regularly giving blood together at the Blood Donation Center for the past year and a half. Realizing the deep need for blood donations to the Medical Center, they pulled together a grassroots group of students to organize the event, working with the Dean of Students Office and the Blood Donation Center, as well as Jeff Leslie, Director of Clinical and Experiential Learning, who opened up the first floor of the Kane Center for the drive. The Law School’s Neighbors group got involved, devoting hours to marketing the event.</p> <p>“We're the community service organization, and this expanded the idea of community service, and allowed us to contribute in another way,” said Jamie Schulte, ’15, Neighbors’ vice president. “Since the blood at the Medical Center is used within the community, this is a way for us to give back to the Hyde Park and greater South Side Chicago community.”</p> <p><img style="float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150225_blooddrive_0139-edited-web_0.jpg" alt="Alex Gross, '16, said donating blood is an easy way to give back." width="380" height="254" />Seventy-five potential donors participated in the Law School drive, donating a total of 58 units of blood. The organizers are hoping many of those will become regular donors.</p> <p>“We want people to know how important it is to donate, and how easy it is to give directly to the hospital,” Moynihan said.</p> <p>For Gross, the choice to give blood was an obvious one.</p> <p>“A lot of people say they go to law school to help people, and then they get busy in law school and it is harder to help. But this was totally easy,” he said, as he headed off to Environmental Law. “They bring it right to us — there’s no reason not to do it.”<span style="font-family: Calibri;"> </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3><strong>What You Need to Know</strong></h3> <div><strong>&nbsp;</strong></div> <ul> <li>You can donate blood every 56 days.</li> <li>Donating blood will take about 35 minutes.</li> <li>Donating platelets takes about two hours and can be done every seven days, up to 24 times a year.</li> <li>You can donate blood right on campus at the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine, <strong>5758 S. Maryland Avenue, Room 2E</strong>.</li> <li>To schedule a donation, call <strong>(773) 702-6247 or</strong> email <a href="mailto:DonorServices@uchospitals.edu">DonorServices@uchospitals.edu</a></li> <li>The Blood Donation Center is open Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.</li> <li>For more information, visit: <a href="http://www.uchospitals.edu/visitor/for-patients/guide/donate-blood.html">http://www.uchospitals.edu/visitor/for-patients/guide/donate-blood.html</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/20150225_blooddrive_0131_edited_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1570385">20150225_blooddrive_0131_edited.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:33:32 +0000 beckygillespie 26073 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Panel: "Ferguson and Beyond: Criminal Procedure and Police Killings" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/panel-ferguson-and-beyond-criminal-procedure-and-police-killings <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194049195&amp;color=800000&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This panel was moderated by Professor Siegler and included Deputy Dean Ginsburg and Professors Huq, McAdams, and Randolph Stone.</p> <p>The event took place on February 4, 2015. It was presented by BLSA in partnership with the Law School and cosponsored by ACS, APALSA, Criminal Law Society, Defenders, Human Rights Law Society, LLSA, LSRJ, LWC, PILS, and SALSA.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-event"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Event listing:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/events/2015-02-04-ferguson-and-beyond-criminal-procedure-and-police-killings">Ferguson and Beyond: Criminal Procedure and Police Killings</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-faculty"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/siegler">Alison Siegler</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/ginsburg-t">Tom Ginsburg</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/huq">Aziz Huq</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/mcadams">Richard H. McAdams</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-r">Randolph N. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related video:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/video/ferguson-beyond-criminal-procedure-police-killings">Panel: &quot;Ferguson and Beyond: Criminal Procedure and Police Killings&quot;</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:16:46 +0000 willcanderson 26104 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Panel: "Ferguson and Beyond: Criminal Procedure and Police Killings" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/video/ferguson-beyond-criminal-procedure-police-killings <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This panel was moderated by Professor Siegler and included Deputy Dean Ginsburg and Professors Huq, McAdams, and Randolph Stone.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GcTe8WVO7Ik?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>This panel was moderated by Professor Siegler and included Deputy Dean Ginsburg and Professors Huq, McAdams, and Randolph Stone.</p> <p>The event took place on February 4, 2015. It was presented by BLSA in partnership with the Law School and cosponsored by ACS, APALSA, Criminal Law Society, Defenders, Human Rights Law Society, LLSA, LSRJ, LWC, PILS, and SALSA.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar-position"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Right </div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:11:07 +0000 willcanderson 26103 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Emily Buss to Serve as Associate Reporter for Restatement on Children and the Law http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/emily-buss-serve-associate-reporter-restatement-children-and-law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The American Law Institute Launches Restatement on Children and the Law </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> American Law Institute </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 3, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This project will deal comprehensively with the legal regulation of children, rather than solely with family law matters.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>PHILADELPHIA – The American Law Institute announced today that it will begin a new Restatement project, <strong><em>Restatement of the Law, Children and the Law</em></strong>.</p> <p>This project will deal comprehensively with the legal regulation of children, rather than solely with family law matters. The project will examine the scope of parental authority, including decisions on health care, education, discipline, and religion; rights and responsibilities of unmarried fathers; duty to rescue and protect children from harm; and state intervention. It will also take on the issues of children in public schools; children in the justice system, including age boundaries on jurisdiction, interrogation, the attorney-client relationship, and mental-health screening, evaluation, and treatment; and children as legal persons, covering tort liability, free-speech rights, regulation of labor, children’s authority to make medical decisions, control over sexuality, and emancipation.</p> <p>&nbsp;“We work diligently on each project to ensure consideration of diverse viewpoints and an unbiased examination of the law,” explained ALI Director Richard Revesz. “Our project participants include advisers, academics, judges, and other practitioners who are leaders in the fields we are examining, as well as ALI members who bring expertise from other fields.&nbsp; ALI’s thorough method of research and interpretation allows us to produce Restatements, Principles and Model Codes that are influential and trusted sources.”</p> <p>Elizabeth S. Scott, Harold R. Medina Professor of Law, Columbia Law School, will serve as project Reporter. Richard J. Bonnie, Harrison Foundation Professor of Law and Medicine, University of Virginia School of Law; Emily Buss, Mark and Barbara Fried Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School; Martin Guggenheim, Fiorello LaGuardia Professor of Clinical Law, New York University School of Law; Clare Huntington, Professor of Law, Fordham University School of Law; and Solangel Maldonado, Professor of Law, Seton Hall University School of Law, will serve as Associate Reporters.</p> <p>“The law’s treatment of children has become increasingly complex and uncertain over the past few decades, in ways that will make the publication of an ALI Restatement particularly valuable to courts, legislatures and attorneys. An important function of the Restatement will be to reinforce the child welfare goal of legal regulation, and, at the same time, to incorporate the law’s contemporary recognition of children as legal persons.” said Scott. “The Restatement process will be informed by a growing body of developmental science and other social science research, an important trend in modern legal doctrine.”</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-american-law-institute-launches-restatement-on-children-and-the-law-300044672.html" title="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-american-law-institute-launches-restatement-on-children-and-the-law-300044672.html">http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-american-law-institute-launc...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/buss">Emily Buss</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Mar 2015 17:59:55 +0000 willcanderson 26101 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu James Squires, '92, Named New CEO of Norfolk Southern http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/james-squires-92-named-new-ceo-norfolk-southern <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Squires, 53, joined Norfolk Southern in 1992. He has held several positions in the law department. He was named president in 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.wdbj7.com/news/local/squires-named-new-ceo-of-norfolk-southern/31563968" title="http://www.wdbj7.com/news/local/squires-named-new-ceo-of-norfolk-southern/31563968">http://www.wdbj7.com/news/local/squires-named-new-ceo-of-norfolk-souther...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) today announced that James A. Squires will succeed Charles W. “Wick” Moorman as chief executive officer. The action by the company’s board of directors is part of its planned succession process and will be effective June 1, 2015.</p> <p>Squires will continue in his current capacity as president and with all major divisions reporting to him, while Moorman will continue as executive chairman of the board of directors. Moorman and Squires will work closely together to ensure a seamless transition of leadership responsibilities.</p> <p>“Jim has the right experience and vision to advance Norfolk Southern’s traditions of safety and service,” said Steven F. Leer, NS’ lead independent director. “NS is well-positioned to continue leading and innovating, and the board of directors is confident in the ability of the entire Thoroughbred team to deliver for our customers, shareholders, and communities.”</p> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:56:28 +0000 willcanderson 26081 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Geoffrey Stone on Academic Freedom and Political Interference http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/geoffrey-stone-academic-freedom-and-political-interference <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A Deadly Assault on Academic Freedom </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Huffington Post </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">February 28, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recent events in the state of North Carolina pose a serious threat to academic freedom in our nation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recent events in the state of North Carolina pose a serious threat to academic freedom in our nation. America's universities are, by any measure, the best in the world. What has made that possible is our deep commitment to academic freedom.<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/28/us/university-of-north-carolina-board-closes-3-academic-centers.html?_r=0" target="_hplink">The recent decision&nbsp;</a>of the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina to close the University of North Carolina Law School's Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity is a blatant and dangerous instance of political interference with academic freedom.</p> <p>Although the Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity has accomplished a great deal in recent years, its mission and its director, Gene Nichol, a distinguished scholar and academic administrator who has served as dean of the University of Colorado Law School and as president of College of William and Mary, have clearly alienated the Koch brother-backed legislators who now control both the state legislature and the University's Board of Governors.</p> <p>In the guise of trimming the university's budget, the Board has decided to shutter three of the 240 boards, centers, and institutes that operate within the state university system. By coincidence, they decided to close the Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity with the patently false explanation that the Center was unproductive. Anyone who has examined the work of the Center knows that this claim is bogus. The plain and simple fact is that both the Center and its director advocate positions that the Tea Party powers-that-be in North Carolina do not like.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/a-deadly-assault-on-academic-freedom_b_6776322.html" title="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/a-deadly-assault-on-academic-freedom_b_6776322.html">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/a-deadly-assault-on-acade...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-g">Geoffrey R. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:01:57 +0000 willcanderson 26074 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Weinrib Delivers Midway Dinner Speech: 'Take Advantage of the Incredible Opportunities' http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/weinrib-delivers-midway-dinner-speech-take-advantage-incredible-opportunities <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Annual Midway Dinner Speech </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Laura Weinrib </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">February 27, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Good evening. It is a great pleasure to be speaking this evening at one of the Law School’s cherished traditions, the Midway Dinner.</p> <p>It’s my task as speaker today to explain to you why you’re here, across the Midway, celebrating the midpoint of your Law School education. There are two symbolic components to this event. The first is chronological, and the second is geographic. The chronological piece is straightforward. You’re midway through law school. For many of you, that means you’re halfway through the last formal degree you will pursue. Make the most of your last four quarters. As you’ve probably begun to realize, time is short. That first fall, as you studied for your first set of exams, your remaining time here undoubtedly stretched out into eternity. Now that you’ve mastered the Law School’s rhythms and routines, you may feel like you’re hurtling toward graduation at breakneck speed. The first message of the Midway Dinner is that you can accomplish quite a lot in a year and a half. That’s a lesson a former Law School faculty member and current United States president evidently internalized at a previous Midway Dinner, and we hope it sticks with you, too. We urge you to take advantage of the incredible opportunities our Law School has to offer.</p> <p>Now we come to our second theme, namely, but not <em>just </em>our law school. It is my primary duty as your Midway Dinner speaker to advise you to branch out and try some courses in schools and departments outside the Law School—which, as it happens, are primarily located here on the north side of the Midway. This point is related to the previous one. For most of you, I hope, the scarcity of your remaining time here is a source of great sadness. A few of you may be eager to move on to what’s next. Whether you’d like to slow things down or speed things up, taking a course across the Midway can help. If you opt for a sufficiently unfamiliar course — perhaps “Evolution of the Hominoidea” in Anthropology or “Elementary Hittite” in the Department of Ancient Anatolian Languages — time might just creep along at the same snail’s pace as it did your first quarter. On the other hand, as Thomas Mann suggested in his great novel the <em>Magic Mountain</em>, time seems to pass more slowly when one doesn't move in space. So if your preference is to speed things along, it follows that you should venture out of the Law School. If you’re interested in exploring that idea further, I urge you to take a class in the Department of Comparative Literature, which, fortuitously, is located on this far side of the Midway.</p> <p>You are likely thinking at this point that I’m delivering a rather strange message for a Law School function. You may be wondering why we have assembled all of you at a formal event to tell you to take courses with non-Law School faculty, outside the Law School. And no, it’s not because we’re hoping for a reduced teaching load. In short, it’s because we want the next generation of leaders, of all kinds, to come from this institution. To explain what I mean, I’ll begin with a quote:</p> <p>“Excessive trends towards purely technical training have been continuously observed by experts in education. At certain times and places it was a close question as to whether or not the main efforts and resources of some institutions of learning would not be devoted to simple trade school curricula. This I know has been evident in legal education where purely professional training has been too often the dominant note. … There is demand [today] for a re-awakening of the ancient concept of the university as the custodian of the things of the mind and the values of the spirit. … Technical training will not alone suffice. We must reorient much of our materialistic philosophy in terms of humanitarian principles.”</p> <p>In the context of recent calls to shorten students’ time at law school and to eliminate what some lawyers regard as extraneous padding, the passage I read to you may sound like it came from the last issue of the <em>Chronicle of Higher Education</em>. But since I’m a historian, you’ve probably guessed that that’s not the case. Also, the prose is a little stilted. I edited out some of the passages that sound particularly antiquated, like the one suggesting that the “spiritual element” of education is “the preventive of planetary disintegration.” That one had me stumped, so I did a little digging. It turns out that it’s possible to quantitatively model the disintegration of the solar planetary system, and I’m pretty sure you can study this across the Midway. But it’s not clear to me how reintroducing a spiritual element into Civil Procedure is going to prevent Earth from separating from the solar system in approximately 53 billion years, so I suspect the speaker I quoted had something else in mind.</p> <p>I should pause here to acknowledge that some of you may find the quotation’s critique of so-called “materialistic philosophy” to be misplaced and unfair. That’s fine too. &nbsp;If you fall into that category, we urge you to pay special attention to Dean Schill’s remarks at part three of our formal dinner trilogy, at which time the Dean will infuse your “materialistic philosophy” with “humanitarian principles” by welcoming you to a lifetime of generous giving to the Law School.</p> <p>Enough build up. What we’ve got here is a 1939 speech by William O. Douglas, then chairman of the new SEC, about a month before his nomination to the United States Supreme Court. According to Douglas, the excessive instrumentalism of legal education, its focus on skills and employment at the expense of intellectual enrichment, was a detriment to democracy as well as lawyering. Douglas believed that a robust approach to learning could bind people together “in a common cause” and ease “dissension and turmoil” — that is, the planetary disintegration I mentioned earlier. He went on to define the missing “spiritual element” as the domain of “human values,” an ethical “longing to be identified with some cause dedicated to the interests of humanity.” And he believed it was the role of the university to nourish and sustain that “democratic ideal.”</p> <p>Douglas had spent his college summers picking cherries to fund his education. Many decades before Ferguson, he recalled that police had shot at the desperately poor migrant workers who labored alongside him. The result, much like today, was a general distrust in law enforcement and legal actors. Douglas thought that part of the problem was an unduly narrow understanding of law’s purpose and underlying values—a deficiency partly attributable to failures at the level of education. He wanted the law to be a source of social betterment instead of “cruelty and hardness.” And he hoped that interdisciplinary education could promote a more inclusive society and help to reduce social and economic injustice.</p> <p>Now Justice Douglas was a graduate of Columbia Law School, taught at Yale, and as far as I can tell had no connection whatsoever to the University of Chicago. He does, however, hold several records for productivity and wrote thirty books while on the Supreme Court, so he would have fit in here very well.</p> <p>I can get closer to home, though. As many of you know, this law school has a rich history of encouraging interdisciplinary learning. Almost forty years before soon-to-be Justice Douglas gave his speech, the esteemed lawyer and political scientist Ernst Freund was given the task of designing a curriculum for the University of Chicago’s new Law School. Freund envisioned a program that would emphasize political science, history, sociology, and economics in addition to what contemporaries referred to as “technical law subjects.” And while there were some obstacles early on, Freund’s plan largely prevailed, with the support of the university’s president, William Rainey Harper. Harper believed that law and legal methods could not be properly understood “without a clear comprehension of the historic forces of which they are the product, and of the social environment with which they are in living contact.” He continued: “A scientific study of law involves the related sciences of history, economics, philosophy - the whole field of man as social being.”</p> <p>Happily, the faculty and students of this law school succeeded admirably in implementing Freund and Harper’s vision. When Justice Douglas gave his 1939 address, law schools throughout the country were facing pressure to jettison their interdisciplinary offerings in favor of technical instruction. The University of Chicago Law School, then as now, was resolute in its determination to resist that trend. Its stewards understood that breadth of knowledge, analytic sophistication, and rigorous exposure to diverse methodologies and ideas were all crucial to leadership in the legal profession and in the larger political and social world.</p> <p>Now if this were a history class, I’d warn you off this kind of “the more things change the more they stay the same” narrative. But I’m going to bracket the nuance this evening, because it suits my normative, presentist objectives to do so. Since I teach at the law school rather than the history department, I’m allowed to do that kind of thing, which, incidentally, is another good reason you should take courses across the Midway.</p> <p>I hope that I’ve convinced you that taking classes outside the Law School will make you think more critically and robustly about everything you do, including your legal practice. Perhaps it will even help you tackle the troubling social and economic problems, if not planetary disintegration, that plague us today. But for the skeptics and rational actors among you, there are some concrete advantages, as well. I’ll try to keep this brief since, like your experience at the law school, my remarks have no doubt felt quite protracted, and my remaining time is running short.</p> <p>First, most of the university’s departments are closer than the Law School to Regents Park and the Metra station, and taking classes north of the Midway is a good way to cut down on your commute. That’s especially convenient when there are two feet of snow on the ground, or when it’s -30 outside.</p> <p>Second, you get to talk to non-lawyers. Rather, you <em>have</em> to talk to non-lawyers. We sometimes slip into a peculiar language within the walls of the law school. You all know what I mean. If you have ever tried to explain the rule against perpetuities to a non-lawyer parent or partner, you have discovered that not everyone speaks “law school.” Whether you’re talking to clients or the public, you need to know how to simplify the many insights you’ve acquired here for broader consumption. I want to flag that this is one of the big factors that distinguishes interdisciplinary education across the Midway from the incredible interdisciplinary offerings in our own Laird Bell Quadrangle. Our Law School course catalog lists classes in subjects Ernst Freund could have only imagined. But since there is no Midway dinner for the Humanities Division or the Divisions of Physical or Social Sciences, only a handful of students in other departments make the southward journey. So if you want to take a class with a critical mass of non-law students, it falls on you to cross the Midway.</p> <p>Third, you get to <em>listen</em> to non-lawyers. This one follows from the previous point, but for some law students, it’s a bit more difficult. It’s important, though, for a couple of reasons. In legal practice, you’ll have to understand what motivates your clients and what’s persuasive to a wide range of decision-makers, whether it’s efficiency or social justice. And you’ll also need some humility. Talking to environmental scientists about climate change or labor economists about unemployment is a good reminder that your Law School classes can’t cover everything, hard though we may try. Taking classes across the Midway can teach you pretty quickly when you need to stop talking and listen.</p> <p>Whatever your future aspirations and ambitions, I hope that you bear these advantages in mind. At this midway point in your Law School education, pause to investigate the tremendous resources that are available to you at this university. And as you consider your course selections for your next four quarters, leave space for the Psychology of Negotiation or the Rhetoric of Expertise in Professional Life. Or venture even further from your legal studies: perhaps the History of Chinese Theater or Migration and Displacement in Modern Europe.&nbsp; You may find that a broader outlook premised on broader interests will bring you closer to the kind of lawyering that to-be-Justice Douglas promoted. It may be that the “spiritual element” you’ve been seeking lies in the rich world of ideas across the Midway.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/weinrib">Laura Weinrib</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/20150204_midwaydinner_8384.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=7694556">20150204_midwaydinner_8384.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:23:37 +0000 beckygillespie 25721 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Craig Futterman: Problem is Not A Single Police "Black Site"; It's Systemic http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/craig-futterman-problem-not-single-police-black-site-its-systemic <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chicago Police&#039;s So-Called &#039;Black Site&#039; Mischaracterized </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Susie An </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> WBEZ </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">February 26, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“If there’s a risk, I think it’s elevating this facility,” Futterman said. “And making it look like there’s a problem in one particular station, as opposed to there’s a broader systemic problem to people who are very vulnerable who are denied their basic fundamental constitutional right.”</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Lawyers and local crime reporters say <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/feb/24/chicago-police-detain-americans-black-site" target="_blank">a widely-shared article from <em>The Guardian</em></a> mischaracterized a Chicago Police Department facility called Homan Square as the equivalent of a CIA "black site."</p> <p>Black sites house detainees who undergo interrogation in highly secretive prisons. But the non-descript Homan Square building on the city’s West Side is not exactly off-the-books.</p> <p>In the past few years WBEZ reporters and other journalists have been to the facility for tours and interviews as well as press conferences.</p> <p>[...]</p> <p>Craig Futterman, a clinical professor of law at the University of Chicago, said prisoners are held without being entered into the system all over the city, not just Homan Square.</p> <p>Futterman says it’s an exaggeration to call it a "black site."</p> <p>“If there’s a risk, I think it’s elevating this facility,” Futterman said. “And making it look like there’s a problem in one particular station, as opposed to there’s a broader systemic problem to people who are very vulnerable who are denied their basic fundamental constitutional right.”</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-polices-so-called-black-site-mischaracterized-111629" title="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-polices-so-called-black-site-mischaracterized-111629">http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-polices-so-called-black-site-mischaract...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/futterman">Craig B. Futterman</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Related coverage:</p> <p>Chicago Tribune: <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-homan-square-chicago-police-met-20150227-story.html">Lawyers Wary of Claim about Chicago Police 'Black Site,' Say Abuse Citywide</a></p> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 26 Feb 2015 23:02:01 +0000 willcanderson 26027 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Panel with Tom Ginsburg: "The War on Japan's Pacifist Constitution" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/video/ginsburg-japans-pacifist-constitution <p><iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/111672091" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/111672091">The War on Japan&#039;s Pacifist Constitution</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user13484037">Clough Center</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p>On Wednesday, November 5, the Clough Center at Boston College hosted this panel discussion featuring Tom Ginsburg, Leo Spitz Professor of International Law and Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago; Tokujin Matsudaira, Associate Professor of Law, Kanagawa University; and Franziska Seraphim, Associate Professor of History, Boston College.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar-position"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Right </div> </div> </div> Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:56:40 +0000 willcanderson 25988 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Arielle Tokorcheck, '11, Joins Hall, Render, Killian, Heath, & Lyman http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/arielle-tokorcheck-11-joins-hall-render-killian-heath-lyman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Hall, Render, Killian, Heath &amp; Lyman, the largest health care focused law firm in the nation, is pleased to announce associate attorney Arielle Tokorcheck, J.D., has joined the firm's Indianapolis office.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.hallrender.com/">Hall, Render, Killian, Heath &amp; Lyman</a>, the largest health care focused law firm in the nation, is pleased to announce associate attorney Arielle Tokorcheck, J.D., has joined the firm's Indianapolis office.</p> <p>Tokorcheck practices largely within the firm's Supply Chain Procurement, Operations &amp; Management practice area, assisting with contracting and compliance matters affecting hospitals and health systems. She completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Notre Dame in 2008 and received her law degree from the University of Chicago Law School in 2011, where she served as board member for the school's Health Law Society.</p> <p>Tokorcheck is admitted to practice in California and Michigan and is a member of the American Health Lawyers Association and the California Society for Healthcare Attorneys.</p> Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:44:33 +0000 willcanderson 25982 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu