News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Scholars Take a Rights-Based Approach to Tuberculosis Epidemic in India http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/scholars-take-rights-based-approach-tuberculosis-epidemic-india <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Wen Huang and Nik Dhingra </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> University of Chicago News Office </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 26, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed a multidisciplinary public health initiative that aims to make human rights an important component in the control and prevention of tuberculosis.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed a multidisciplinary public health initiative that aims to make human rights an important component in the control and prevention of tuberculosis. The initiative is focused on low- and middle-income populations in India, which is home to a quarter of the world’s tuberculosis cases.</p> <p>The rights-based approach promotes the use of litigation, legislative and policy advocacy, and grassroots activism to improve prevention and treatment outcomes for tuberculosis. It also protects the rights of people living with and vulnerable to tuberculosis. Researchers will be traveling to Beijing and Hong Kong later this year to disseminate their ideas beyond India.</p> <p>Brian Citro, lecturer and acting associate director of the Human Rights Clinic at the University of Chicago Law School, spearheaded the effort with Evan Lyon, assistant professor of medicine, and Kiran Raj Pandey, a physician and Health Services research fellow. Mihir Mankad, health policy adviser at Save the Children UK, is the fourth member of the project team. A group of UChicago law students are also involved.</p> <p>Citro said the project, funded by UChicago’s global centers in Delhi, Beijing and Hong Kong, is inspired by the global rights-based campaigns against HIV, which have helped galvanize public support, spurred research and improved access to medicine.</p> <p>Even though tuberculosis is a treatable illness, the World Health Organization estimates that it remains a worldwide leading cause of death arising from a single infectious agent. In 2013 alone, there were approximately nine million new cases of tuberculosis and 1.5 million related deaths.</p> <p>Citro points out that the burden of the disease is disproportionately borne by low- and middle-income countries, which account for 95 percent of all deaths from tuberculosis globally. In recent years, drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis have occurred partially because there is no effective infection control and because patients experience interruptions in their treatment.</p> <p>“In India, this public health crisis is driven by social and economic factors and structural barriers,” said Lyon, who has worked on public health and clinical programs for tuberculosis and HIV for 15 years. As in other parts of the world, Lyon notes that individuals most vulnerable to tuberculosis in India are the poor, persons living with HIV, migrants, drug users and prisoners. These groups often do not have access to testing and treatment services, and lack awareness about the nature of the contagion and prevention techniques. Poor sanitation and unhealthy living conditions perpetrate the problem. Stigma and discrimination are rampant.</p> <p>“We need to move away from a strictly biomedical-centered approach to a more rights-based one,” said Pandey, a Nepalese native who worked as a medical officer at a rural district hospital in Doti, Nepal from 2007 to 2009, managing a tuberculosis clinic and an anti-retroviral therapy HIV center.</p> <p>Pandey said one of the project’s key goals is to articulate the legal obligations of governments to ensure access to quality testing and treatment of TB. This includes a responsibility to effectively regulate the private health sector and to ensure adequate financing for tuberculosis, through budget prioritization and equitable resource allocation.</p> <p>In December 2014, the UChicago project was launched with a conference at the University’s Center in Delhi. The conference brought together more than 70 international experts, including lawyers, doctors, researchers, human rights activists, government officials and former tuberculosis patients. Featured topics included identifying tuberculosis “hot spots” in slums and other highly affected areas; lessons from the doctors’ work in Nepal and Haiti; the growing problem of drug-resistant tuberculosis and access to quality tuberculosis diagnostics.</p> <p>“The conference was successful because it started a dialogue and established partnerships,” Citro said. “Many of the people we brought together, especially some of the medical researchers and government officials, had never thought about tuberculosis from a human-rights perspective. Now they’re open to the approach.”</p> <p>Following the conference, project members have conducted legal research and analysis, including international treaties, case law, related United Nations reports, case studies and policies related to the disease. In the summer, they are planning a judicial workshop to familiarize the legal community in India and other Commonwealth countries with the legal and human rights issues associated with tuberculosis. Citro and Pandey presented their ideas in early March to district-level health workers and community activists in Tamil Nadu, a southern state in India.</p> <p>In addition, the project team will guest-edit an issue of the&nbsp;<em>Health and Human Rights Journal</em>&nbsp;out of the Harvard School of Public Health, which will be published in 2016 and dedicated to tuberculosis and the right to health.</p> <p>“We believe a rights-based approach to tuberculosis will not only protect the rights of people living with tuberculosis, but will result in better health outcomes. Encouraging the active and informed participation of people living with and vulnerable to tuberculosis is key to this process,” Citro said.</p> <p><em>Becky Gillespie contributed to this article.</em></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/citro">Brian Citro</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h2>Related coverage:</h2> <p class="title"><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/clinic-brings-human-rights-focus-fight-against-tb">Clinic Brings a Human-Rights Focus to Fight Against TB</a></p> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 26 Mar 2015 19:52:40 +0000 willcanderson 26534 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu An Empirical Examination of Why Mobile Money Schemes Ignite in Some Developing Countries but Flounder in Most http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/david-evans-empirical-examination-why-mobile-money-schemes-ignite-some-developing-c <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Evans_colour2.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This paper reports the results of an empirical study of mobile money schemes in 22 developing countries chosen based on prior evidence to include roughly equal numbers of successes and failures.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> David Evans </div> </div> </div> <p>Mobile money schemes have grown rapidly in some developing countries but failed in many more. This paper reports the results of an empirical study of mobile money schemes in 22 developing countries chosen based on prior evidence to include roughly equal numbers of successes and failures. It uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative evidence to determine why some countries succeeded in launching mobile money schemes and others failed. The analysis is guided by multi-sided platform economics and in particular recent work on the role of ignition and critical mass. We found that of the 22 countries, mobile money schemes have grown rapidly in 8; mobile money schemes have grown but not rapidly in 3; and mobile money schemes have largely failed to take hold in 8. (It is still too soon for us to make a call in 2 countries and there are no bases to determine ignition for 1 country.) Based on a detailed investigation into the similarities and differences between these countries and across the categories we reached several key findings. The first finding is the most robust and important. (1) Heavy regulation, and in particular an insistence that banks play a central role in the schemes, together with burdensome KYC and agent restrictions, is generally fatal to igniting mobile money schemes. (2) Mobile money schemes have been more likely to succeed in poorer countries that lack basic infrastructure. (3) The growth of the send-receive and the cash-in/cash-out platforms must go hand in hand. (4) Ignition and explosive growth occurs quickly or not at all.</p> Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:56:21 +0000 willcanderson 26439 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Judicial Independence and the Rationing of Constitutional Remedies http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/aziz-huq-judicial-independence-and-rationing-constitutional-remedies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Huq%20Aziz%202009-06-18.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This Article analyzes the doctrinal instruments federal courts use to allocate scarce adjudicative resources over competing demands for constitutional remedies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Aziz Huq </div> </div> </div> <p>This Article analyzes the doctrinal instruments federal courts use to allocate scarce adjudicative resources over competing demands for constitutional remedies. It advances two claims. The first is that a central, hitherto underappreciated, doctrinal instrument for rationing judicial resources is a demand that most constitutional claimants demonstrate that an official violated an exceptionally clear, unambiguous constitutional rule — that is, not only that the Constitution was violated, but that the violation evinced a demanding species of fault. This fault rule first emerged in constitutional tort jurisprudence. It has diffused to the suppression and postconviction review contexts. The Article’s second claim is that fault-based rationing of constitutional remedies flows, to an underappreciated degree, from a commitment to judicial independence. Federal courts have developed branch-level autonomy, along with distinctly institutional interests, over the twentieth century. These interests are inconsistent with the vindication of many individualized constitutional claims. While ideological preferences and changing socioeconomic conditions have had well-recognized influences on the path of constitutional remedies, I argue that the judiciary’s institutional preferences have also played a large role. This causal link between judicial independence and remedial rationing raises questions about federal courts’ function in the Separation of Powers.</p> Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:51:34 +0000 willcanderson 26438 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Named Professorship Will Honor Memory of Hyatt Chief Donald Pritzker http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/named-professorship-will-honor-memory-hyatt-chief-donald-pritzker-0 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 26, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Penny, Tony, and J. B. Pritzker have made a $3.5 million gift to endow the Donald N. Pritzker Professorship in Law in honor of their late father, a distinguished 1959 Law School alumnus and a founder and former president of the Hyatt Corp. The professorship will recognize faculty eminence in the area of business law, with a particular focus on entrepreneurialism, intellectual property, and technology.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Penny, Tony, and J. B. Pritzker have made a $3.5 million gift to endow the Donald N. Pritzker Professorship in Law in honor of their late father, a distinguished 1959 Law School alumnus and a founder and former president of the Hyatt Corp. The professorship will recognize faculty eminence in the area of business law, with a particular focus on entrepreneurialism, intellectual property, and technology.</p> <p>“Donald Pritzker was the ultimate entrepreneur, and his professional and personal life was a testament to innovation, leadership, and passion—values the Law School holds dear,” said Michael H. Schill, Dean of the Law School and Harry N. Wyatt Professor of Law. “I am delighted and thrilled by the Pritzkers’ generosity and their commitment to these shared ideals.”</p> <p>Pritzker presided over the Hyatt hotel chain during a time of tremendous growth, from a single motel in California to the fifth-largest hotel chain in the world. He was known for his integrity, loyalty, honesty, and warmth toward others—and he infused these values in the Hyatt culture. He was a devoted mentor who had a deep impact on his employees’ careers, a “magnet” in any crowd, and a loving father who relished time with his family. Pritzker died in 1972 at age 39.</p> <p>“Our father was the most jovial person that I know,” said Tony Pritzker, MBA ’87, the co-founder and managing partner, with his brother J. B., of Pritzker Group, a private investment firm. “He would walk into a room and light up the room.”</p> <p>Added Penny Pritzker, the US Secretary of Commerce: “Dad was a great entertainer, entrepreneur, and innovator, with a larger-than-life personality and a drive that made him the consummate host and a pioneer in the hotel industry. Most importantly, however, he taught us the value of hard work, giving back, and treating every person with respect, whether they were a bellman, corporate titan, or the President. He was taken from us at too young an age, but I am proud that the strong values he taught us live on in our family and will for generations to come.”</p> <p>In 1967, Donald Pritzker took a newly built Atlanta hotel that the family had bought out of bankruptcy and renamed it the Hyatt Regency Atlanta. The unusual hotel—which had a 21-story atrium lobby with external glass elevators, fountains, and caged tropical birds—was an instant success and became a Hyatt signature, replicated in cities across the globe.</p> <p>He also revolutionized the hotel industry. He created the first “frequent stayer” program—the Hyatt Executive Reservations Secretary program, which rewarded executive secretaries for booking their bosses at Hyatt—and looked for opportunities to add “a touch of Hyatt,” such as turndown service and pillow mints. These little extras eventually became standard practice in the industry.</p> <p>The professorship is an ideal match for the Law School, which is a national leader in integrating business and legal education.</p> <p>“This gift will allow us to expand our already preeminent position as a producer of leaders in business and business law,” Schill said. “Professorships are reserved for scholars of national, or even international, stature, with highly distinguished records of teaching, research, and publication. This exceptional gift befits a man of Donald’s accomplishment.”</p> <p>Pritzker’s children, the donors of the chair, are accomplished entrepreneurs, civic leaders, business executives, and philanthropists.</p> <p>Prior to becoming Secretary of Commerce in 2013, Penny Pritzker founded PSP Capital Partners and Pritzker Realty Group, and cofounded Artemis Real Estate Partners. She is a former member of the Chicago Board of Education and helped create Skills for America’s Future and, later, Skills for Chicagoland’s Future, which matches businesses that have current, unmet hiring needs with qualified, unemployed, or underemployed job seekers.</p> <p>J. B. Pritzker is the leader of Chicago’s growth as a national innovation hub. He was instrumental in creating 1871, Chicago’s digital startup center, and was appointed founding chairman of ChicagoNEXT, the city’s council on innovation and technology. He also helped create Illinois Venture Capital Association, the seed fund Chicago Ventures, the accelerator Techstars Chicago, and the online community BuiltInChicago.org.</p> <p>In addition to his role leading the Pritzker Group with his brother J. B., Tony Pritzker is among the most important civic and philanthropic leaders in Los Angeles. He serves as Chair of UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and cochairs the University’s $4.2 billion campaign. He is also on the boards of California Institute for the Arts, Heal the Bay, and the Emmett Center on Climate Change and the Environment, as well as the Board of Overseers of Dartmouth College.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Philanthropy was instilled in them by their parents.</p> <p>“Our parents taught us that we were entitled to nothing but that we were the luckiest people alive,” J. B. Pritzker said. “So, as a result, we owed something back to this world that had given us so much. That meant we needed to be charitably involved, we needed to be politically involved. … They showed us that in everything they did.”</p> <p><a href="http://campaign.uchicago.edu/">The University of Chicago Campaign: Inquiry and Impact</a>, the most ambitious and comprehensive campaign in the University’s history, will raise $4.5 billion to support faculty and researchers, practitioners and patients, and students and programs across the University. Launched in October 2014,&nbsp;the campaign&nbsp;<a href="https://campaign.uchicago.edu/priorities/">supports priorities</a>&nbsp;in every division, school, department, and institute, and&nbsp;aims to engage 125,000 alumni and friends over its five-year duration.&nbsp;</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/schill">Michael H. Schill</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Photo of Donald N. Pritzker, cropped from family photo:</strong></p> <p>University of Chicago Photographic Archive, [apf digital item number, e.g., apf12345], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.</p> <h2>Related coverage:</h2> <p>Crain's Chicago Business:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150326/BLOGS03/150329846/u-of-c-law-school-gets-3-5-million-gift-from-pritzkers">U of C Law School Gets $3.5 Million Gift from Pritzkers</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/donald-n.-pritzker-headshot.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=23284">donald-n.-pritzker-headshot.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 26 Mar 2015 15:30:00 +0000 beckygillespie 26241 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Martha Nussbaum: 'For a politics of humanism' http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/martha-nussbaum-politics-humanism <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> &#039;For a politics of humanism&#039; </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rajgopal Saikumar </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Hindu </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 26, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Scholar-academic Martha Nussbaum argues for a culture of equal respect for all and a cultivation of empathy in the public sphere.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>A prodigious scholar who has published innumerable books and articles, Martha Nussbaum has made landmark contributions in the field of moral and political philosophy, sexuality, justice, human development and religion.&nbsp;</em><em>She is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago and is appointed in the law school and philosophy department. She is also member of the Committee on South Asian studies. Her recent books include&nbsp;</em>Political Emotions: Why Love Matters for Justice (2013), The New Religious Intolerance: Overcoming the Politics of Fear in an Anxious Age&nbsp;<em>(2012) and&nbsp;</em>Not For Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities (2010).&nbsp;<em>In an email interview to&nbsp;<strong>Rajgopal Saikumar</strong>, Professor Nussbaum discusses politico-legal treatment of sexual minorities and the ideals of humanism, including the treatment of crime with a&nbsp;</em><em>rational spirit</em><em>.</em></p> <p><strong>You have written extensively about the politics of disgust as opposed to the ideals of humanism. How would you characterise the politico-legal treatment of sexual minorities in India within such a frame?</strong></p> <p>I think that there is a struggle going on, both in Indian society and in the Indian judiciary, between a view of sexual minorities based upon disgust (and modelled on Victorian British Puritanism and not at all on older Indian traditions) and a humanistic morality based on ideas of equality, dignity and inclusiveness. The Delhi High Court in the Naz case articulated the latter vision beautifully; the two-judge panel of the Supreme Court that heard the appeal negated that vision and reinstated (with approving reference to Macauley!) the puritanical British vision. Then, in April 2014, a different two-judge panel of the Supreme Court, hearing a case relating to transgender persons, once again affirmed the inclusive and respectful vision, giving transgender persons a range of new rights. Society as a whole is similarly conflicted.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/for-a-politics-of-humanism/article7032652.ece" title="http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/for-a-politics-of-humanism/article7032652.ece">http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/for-a-politics-of-humanism/article...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/nussbaum">Martha Nussbaum</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 26 Mar 2015 15:09:41 +0000 willcanderson 26432 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Ruby Garrett, '16, Awarded Latham & Watkins Diversity Scholarship http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/ruby-garrett-16-awarded-latham-watkins-diversity-scholarship-0 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Six Law Students Earn Diversity Scholarships </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Latham &amp; Watkins LLP </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 25, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ruby Garrett, '16, has been selected as a Latham &amp; Watkins Diversity Scholar. The program is designed to increase the number of diverse law students studying at ABA-accredited law schools who want to pursue a career in a global law firm and intend to practice law in the United States. Each year six second-year students are awarded a $10,000 scholarship. <a rel="nofollow" href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F1OwQyxm&amp;h=XAQFF_n4C&amp;enc=AZPdl_NvmYOOJ6gmNCC7zQqdY1CikecHr40CP5LH5mMIhQ7_H444n1GnjFtSZ36pAgso_pxeO77LhHspam4gdrnrYdSpkjS36K-40vV6zd6MGLfjC0n4bs-KQpuqNmEKckGU-Ip-NqPYF4LCTUD5uCLktleVVtzXZWoi2smZ0s-HIQ&amp;s=1" target="_blank"></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/23948">Ruby Garrett</a>, '16,&nbsp;has been selected as a 2015 Latham &amp; Watkins Diversity Scholar.&nbsp;Garrett, the president of the Black Law Students Association,&nbsp;is one of six law students who were selected from a pool of nearly 300 applicants.</p> <p>Now in its tenth year, the Latham &amp; Watkins Diversity Scholars Program is designed to increase the number of diverse law students studying at ABA-accredited law schools who want to pursue a career in a global law firm and intend to practice law in the United States.</p> <p>Each scholarship recipient will receive $10,000 for use during his or her third year of law school. Since its launch in 2005, the program has awarded almost $500,000 in scholarships to law students.</p> <p class="BodyText1">Candidates for the Diversity Scholars Program submitted written applications, detailing academic and leadership achievements as well as their life and work experiences.</p> <p class="BodyText1">“The applicants to our Diversity Scholars program are so inspiring and give me great hope and excitement about the future of the legal profession. Every candidate possesses so much talent and potential,” said Nadia Sager, Chair of the Diversity Leadership Committee at Latham &amp; Watkins. “The six students we selected are truly the best of the best.”</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.lw.com/news/2015-diversity-scholars">http://www.lw.com/news/2015-diversity-scholars</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/garrett_ruby_1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=337888">garrett_ruby.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 25 Mar 2015 21:53:06 +0000 beckygillespie 26423 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Ruby Garrett, '16, Awarded Latham & Watkins Diversity Scholarship http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/ruby-garrett-16-awarded-latham-watkins-diversity-scholarship <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Six Law Students Earn Diversity Scholarships </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Latham &amp; Watkins LLP </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 25, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ruby Garrett, '16, has been selected as a Latham &amp; Watkins Diversity Scholar. The program is designed to increase the number of diverse law students studying at ABA-accredited law schools who want to pursue a career in a global law firm and intend to practice law in the United States. Each year six second-year students are awarded a $10,000 scholarship. <a rel="nofollow" href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F1OwQyxm&amp;h=XAQFF_n4C&amp;enc=AZPdl_NvmYOOJ6gmNCC7zQqdY1CikecHr40CP5LH5mMIhQ7_H444n1GnjFtSZ36pAgso_pxeO77LhHspam4gdrnrYdSpkjS36K-40vV6zd6MGLfjC0n4bs-KQpuqNmEKckGU-Ip-NqPYF4LCTUD5uCLktleVVtzXZWoi2smZ0s-HIQ&amp;s=1" target="_blank"></a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/23948">Ruby Garrett</a>, '16,&nbsp;has been selected as a 2015 Latham &amp; Watkins Diversity Scholar.&nbsp;Garrett, the president of the Black Law Students Association,&nbsp;is one of six law students who were selected from a pool of nearly 300 applicants.</p> <p>Now in its tenth year, the Latham &amp; Watkins Diversity Scholars Program is designed to increase the number of diverse law students studying at ABA-accredited law schools who want to pursue a career in a global law firm and intend to practice law in the United States.</p> <p>Each scholarship recipient will receive $10,000 for use during his or her third year of law school. Since its launch in 2005, the program has awarded almost $500,000 in scholarships to law students.</p> <p class="BodyText1">Candidates for the Diversity Scholars Program submitted written applications, detailing academic and leadership achievements as well as their life and work experiences. The firm received almost 300 applications from students at over 90 US law schools.</p> <p class="BodyText1">“The applicants to our Diversity Scholars program are so inspiring and give me great hope and excitement about the future of the legal profession. Every candidate possesses so much talent and potential,” said Nadia Sager, Chair of the Diversity Leadership Committee at Latham &amp; Watkins. “The six students we selected are truly the best of the best.”</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.lw.com/news/2015-diversity-scholars">http://www.lw.com/news/2015-diversity-scholars</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/garrett_ruby_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=337888">garrett_ruby.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 25 Mar 2015 21:51:43 +0000 beckygillespie 26422 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Beth Kregor to Chicago's Next Mayor: Cut the Red Tape http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/beth-kregor-chicagos-next-mayor-cut-red-tape <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Hey, Chicago&#039;s Next Mayor: Cut the Red Tape and Help All Entrepreneurs Thrive </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Beth Kregor, Elliot Richardson and Michael Lucci </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Crain&#039;s Chicago Business </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 24, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Whoever is mayor one month from now should push wide-ranging reforms to address the rules and red tape that trip up entrepreneurs in all neighborhoods.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Mayor Rahm Emanuel recently pushed the idea of creating “right to thrive zones” to help economically depressed neighborhoods. But broader regulatory reform is needed across all of Chicago to foster the spirit of entrepreneurship that drives great cities. Whoever is mayor one month from now should push wide-ranging reforms to address the rules and red tape that trip up entrepreneurs in all neighborhoods.</p> <p>Small businesses can bring a steady stream of opportunities into Chicago's neighborhoods, infusing them with new flavors and innovative ideas, while making city streets safer and local jobs more plentiful. But Chicago's notoriously complicated regulations create bottlenecks, reducing that stream to a trickle.</p> <p>City leaders should open the floodgates of opportunity. The following reforms will help make that happen...</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150324/OPINION/150329937/hey-chicagos-next-mayor-cut-the-red-tape-and-help-all-entrepreneurs" title="http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150324/OPINION/150329937/hey-chicagos-next-mayor-cut-the-red-tape-and-help-all-entrepreneurs">http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150324/OPINION/150329937/hey-ch...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/kregor">Elizabeth Kregor</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 24 Mar 2015 15:43:01 +0000 willcanderson 26404 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu New Intellectual Community Grows as Buss Teaches Youth Justice to Teens from Lab, Woodlawn Charter http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/new-intellectual-community-grows-buss-teaches-youth-justice-teens-lab-woodlawn-charter <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 24, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Professor Emily Buss offered her Law School Juvenile Justice class this winter to 15 teens from Lab and Woodlawn Charter. For eight weeks, the students studied law; engaged in frank discussion and analysis; offered their unique perspectives on juvenile offenders, culpability, Disproportionate Minority Contact, crime prevention, and youth interactions with police; and formed unexpected bonds with eight Law Student teaching assistants.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It was dinner time on a Monday evening and, as they finished eating, Jala Conley and her classmates were carefully considering the questions Professor Emily Buss had posed in their Juvenile Justice seminar at the Law School. The issues were particularly tough that night: Why are minority youth disproportionately arrested and incarcerated? What can society, schools, law enforcement, and the courts do to address "<a href="http://www.ojjdp.gov/programs/ProgSummary.asp?pi=18&amp;ti">Disproportionate Minority Contact</a>" with its devastating impact on youth of color?</p> <p>“It’s a problem, and we haven’t figured out how to solve it,” Buss, the Mark and Barbara Fried Professor of Law, had told the class before they broke into small groups.&nbsp;She'd given&nbsp;them a smile as she announced their assignment for the remainder of class: &nbsp;“It’s up to you all — you have an hour.”</p> <p>What followed was remarkable, though not because the students shared keen observations and <img style="margin-right: 10px; margin-left: 10px; float: left;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_9988-web-5.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="233" />made surprising connections — although they did — but because they were mostly between the ages of 15 and 18. The new class, a modified version of the seminar Buss teaches Law School students, was designed for a small group of University-affiliated high school pupils interested in delving into the complicated issues of youth justice. And so for eight weeks this winter, the teens — eight from the <a href="http://www.ucls.uchicago.edu/">Laboratory High School</a> and seven from the <a href="http://www.uchicagocharter.org/page.cfm?p=519">University of Chicago Woodlawn Charter School</a> — studied law, engaged in frank discussion and analysis, and offered their unique perspectives on juvenile offenders, culpability, Disproportionate Minority Contact, crime prevention, and youth interactions with police. Eight law students, all 2Ls and 3Ls enrolled in Buss’s Law School seminar, served as teaching assistants — an experience that introduced them to new views on youth justice and led to unexpected mentoring relationships.</p> <p>“There is a freshness about how the young people approach things, what they’re willing to say,” Buss said. “They are full of ideas, they are full of enthusiasm, and when they’re excited about something, the sky is the limit.”</p> <p>As Conley’s group grappled with questions of racial bias and school discipline, they were passionate and pensive and often delivered what seemed to be deeply personal commentary.</p> <p>“I just feel like the schools with students of color have tough rules because they know that’s how the real world is going to treat us,” Conley, a senior at Woodlawn, told her classmates. “I don’t think they always go about it the right way, but they’re letting us know now that that’s how the world is going to handle us, and this way, we can learn to react.”</p> <p>After a few minutes of discussion, law student Keiko Rose, '15, threw out a question: “How do we change the real world then? Is it top down, such as the legislators enacting laws, or is at the ground level, such as working on everyday interactions between people?”</p> <p>Conley answered quickly. “It’s the everyday interaction,” she said. “Police don’t know how to treat<img style="float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_0068-web-9.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="233" /> students of color. So people have to engage and make connections, otherwise everyone’s just basing things on assumptions. You can’t assume just because someone is of color that they’re up to no good. You have to go in without seeing color, I guess.”</p> <p>Maybe then, Rose ventured, there’s a place for programs designed to foster positive interaction between minority teenagers and police?</p> <p>Conley considered it for a moment then shook her head. “For teenagers, no, that’s not going to work at all because we already have our minds set up about the police,” she said. “But if you started with smaller children, maybe it would work. It would make the kids’ minds clearer, and make the adults’ minds clear, too, because these are still just children.”</p> <p>Later, as Buss reflected on the exchange, she noted that what made the discussions especially interesting, for the students and for her, was that for every student viewpoint, there was a counterview.&nbsp; “The students learned about developing an argument and also showed an intelligent openness to persuasive counterarguments,” Buss said. “And I got the valuable reminder that there is no more a single youth view than there is a single adult view on these issues.”&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>***</p> <p>The idea to offer the Juvenile Justice seminar to high school students grew out of Buss’s scholarly interest in how young people’s experiences with, and observations of, law enforcement impact their social identity development.&nbsp;</p> <p><img style="float: left; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_9993-web-8.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="233" />“Adolescents are in the process of crossing over into adulthood, and in this sense they challenge the law’s age-based categories,” Buss said. “They aren’t children. They aren’t adults. They’re in a transitional phase, and while much of the law is designed to try to help children, the law is not well designed to help adolescents to grow out of childhood. We’re better at drawing lines and having two sets of rules than figuring out how to get young people from here to there.”</p> <p>So part of it was wanting to hear from young people, and wanting some of her law students to hear from them, too. But Buss, who has strong ties to Lab as a parent and a former board member, also wanted to foster interaction among students from Lab, a private school that is more than half Caucasian, and Woodlawn, a public charter school that is nearly 98 percent African-American and operated by the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute. What she didn’t know at the beginning was how the relationships and discussions would unfold among the participants.</p> <p><img style="float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_0064-web-10.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="232" />The high school and Law School versions of the seminar met in back-to-back, two-hour blocks and covered roughly the same topics, though the law students had more reading and delved deeper into legal issues. In the high school class, law students spent a chunk of each session leading small groups in working through tough questions: Why do young people commit crimes? How should society respond, and who should be held responsible? What rights do young people have, and is the criminal justice process fair? How do teens differ from adults, and how should that affect how juvenile offenders are treated? When Buss was in the front of the room, she “cool called” the high school students, encouraging them to participate and share.</p> <p>“Juvenile justice isn’t a topic that is discussed much in my other classes,” said Elizabeth Chon, a junior at Lab who volunteers at a youth crisis hotline and hoped to bring a new layer of thinking to that work. “I hear a lot about juvenile justice issues in my volunteer job, but it’s not something I ever understood deeply. Before this, I was unaware of a lot of the issues and flaws in the juvenile justice system — I feel like a lot of the decisions that are made are arbitrary, and there isn’t as much control over the system as I thought there was.”</p> <p>For the law students, several of whom were drawn to the opportunity because they have worked as teachers or hope to focus on juvenile justice issues as lawyers, the class offered a peek into how teens think, interpret, and process information about the law.</p> <p>“This is an amazing age to be able to learn from,” said Aasiya Glover, ’15. “I wanted to get their <img style="float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_0043-web-4.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="233" />perspective on juvenile justice because they are in the middle of a major maturity shift. They are old enough to get what’s going on in the world, and they’re trying to figure out their place in it. They’re seeing their futures as adults but also thinking about what it means to be a young person and still be subject to all of these rules and restraints.”</p> <p>Glover enjoyed seeing the teens experience sudden breakthroughs in understanding as they connected the dots between different topics. One student, following a discussion on <em>Miranda</em> rights, sent her a text message saying he thought the discussion had “gotten to the heart of the problems of the twenty-first century.”</p> <p>“He was so self-aware, and he found himself identifying with this particular issue in juvenile justice,” she said. “It got him so excited, and he related it to larger systemic issues. It wasn’t an issue about him, or about Chicago — it was a larger issue: how do young people navigate interacting with the police? What are they bringing to that situation? How do you protect yourself? He really took these questions to heart.”</p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">&nbsp;</span>***<br /> As the weeks passed, moments like this continued to unfold, and something else — something <img style="margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_0034-web-3.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="233" />even less tangible — began to emerge. Many of those involved felt sure it had something to do with the broadening sense of community, the subtle shifts in understanding, and the friendships that had begun to take shape. There were sparks of recognition even when experiences differed, or moments when one student “got” what another student was saying. For some, there was a growing sense that these interactions mattered far beyond the classroom.&nbsp;</p> <p>“The kids from the two schools seemed to enjoy working with each other so much, and we enjoyed working with them, too, and that’s all really encouraging,” said Jamie Schulte, ’15. “So much of our juvenile justice system is socio-economically driven, and I think we saw that this idea of collaboration among different populations is something that could be helpful.”</p> <p>Schulte, who worked for two years as a sixth-grade English teacher in Houston, said the two groups talked candidly about differences but also found common ground. “It’s been interesting to see how different some of their experiences are, but how similar their ideas are,” she said.</p> <p>Added Shelton Meyers, a sophomore at Woodlawn: “It was an amazing pleasure to interact with the Lab students and law students. Many of the kids in that seminar were outstandingly different, and had very vigorous imaginations that could come together to create possible solutions on how we could better our community.&nbsp;Those aren't really the types of thought processes that I'm around in my school, so it was really refreshing to hear from other students that think and observe the way I do.”</p> <p>Some law students were surprised to find themselves identifying with the high school students they mentored or developing bonds as they swapped texts after class. This was the case for Ethel Amponsah, ’16, who was assigned as the teaching assistant to two female Woodlawn students.<img style="float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_0022-web-2.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="233" /></p> <p>“I see a younger version of myself within them when they are discussing their opinions about issues, which is something I hadn’t given much thought to before we started,” she said. “All of them come to the conversation drawing from their personal experiences. That’s what makes it such a rich class.”</p> <p>Amponsah regularly exchanges text messages with the two students and has met them for brunch, where they talk about school issues, college, and the future. The students have taught her things, too.</p> <p>“I’ve learned patience, and I’ve learned that I probably underestimate the abilities of young people,” she said. “They have far exceeded my expectations. I don’t know if it’s just that I don’t remember what it’s like to be 17, but I am always blown away by what they’re thinking and what they can do. And I’ve learned that I have something to offer them.”</p> <p>It has added depth to her understanding of the juvenile justice issues she explores in the Law School class, too.</p> <p>“It definitely reframes everything,” she said. “There was a time when I made a comment in the law class, and then three hours later, one of the high school students made the same comment, but in her teenage way. Hearing how she framed it, and what she drew from it, put the issue in context.”</p> <p>Sometimes, the teens’ perspective reflected their unique spot at the intersection of childhood and adulthood.</p> <p><img style="float: left; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_0060-web-7.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="233" />“Some of the students strongly rejected the Supreme Court’s recent analysis concluding that adolescents should be considered less blameworthy for their crimes based on their age. This resistance makes sense because, more than anything, they want to be and be treated like adults,” Buss said. “But, in another exercise where they were asked to use a pie chart to divide a budget among various sorts of programming in response to juvenile crime, a lot of them were drawn to programs that focused on avoiding youth incarceration. In this exercise, it wasn’t irrelevant that they were talking about young people — they were heavily influenced by the social science that suggests that incarcerating young people just turns them into criminals. But when it came to thinking about a judge saying, ‘These are the things that are different about teenagers,’ some of them resisted.”</p> <p>For Buss, the takeaways evolved along with the personal dynamics of the participants.</p> <p>“It was hugely rewarding to create, alongside eight talented and committed law students, a new intellectual community for this group of high school students. I think the creation of this community had tremendous value for both groups of high school students, for the law students, for all of us. We were all playing out the University of Chicago ideal: engaging with one another about ideas, and testing our own and others’ ideas in a very positive and supportive context. Sharing our intellectual culture with young people felt incredibly important.”</p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/buss">Emily Buss</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_0027-web-1.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=43104">20150222_juvenilejusticeseminar_0027-web-1.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 24 Mar 2015 15:13:17 +0000 beckygillespie 26390 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Geoffrey Stone on Texas License Plates and the Confederate Flag http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/geoffrey-stone-texas-license-plates-and-confederate-flag <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Texas License Plates and the Confederate Flag </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Huffington Post </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 23, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Texas Board of Motor Vehicles balked when the Sons of Confederate Veterans sought to include an image of the Confederate flag on the plate that it had designed.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Supreme Court heard arguments today in the case of&nbsp;<em>Walker v. Sons of Confederate Veterans</em>. The case poses an intriguing First Amendment question.</p> <p>Like many states, Texas permits drivers to design specialty license plates bearing messages they want to promote. The states that do this do it largely as a way of generating income because they charge for the privilege.</p> <p>Texas has approved hundreds of different messages on its license plates, including "Choose Life" and "Fight Terrorism," but the Texas Board of Motor Vehicles balked when the Sons of Confederate Veterans sought to include