News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Geoffrey Stone on Phone Metadata, National Security Letters, and the FISC http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/geoffrey-stone-phone-metadata-national-security-letters-and-fisc <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Into the Breach </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The University of Chicago Magazine </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">January 23, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Prof. Stone offers an inside look at his experience on a presidential panel reviewing how the government protects national security and preserves civil liberties.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In August 2013, I was sitting in my office working on a book, minding my own business, when I got a phone call from the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/" target="_blank">White House</a>. I was told that, in the wake of Edward Snowden’s revelations,&nbsp;<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0810/features/obama.shtml" target="_blank">President Obama</a>&nbsp;was appointing a review group to study national security and information privacy issues and asked if I would be willing to serve.</p> <p>My first thought was, “Oh, shit.” This would be a time-consuming process that would distract me from my writing and, like so many previous committees, the group would end up producing a report that would inevitably disappear into somebody’s desk, never to be heard from again.</p> <p>When the president asks, though, you can’t say no, especially when you were the one who, as dean, first appointed him to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">Law School</a>&nbsp;faculty. So I kept my first thought to myself and said, “Sure, happy to do it,” confident that I had an ace in the hole that would prevent me from serving.&nbsp;</p> <p>I knew I would need top-secret clearance, and I figured there was more than enough in my background to preclude that. But, somewhat to my dismay, I expeditiously received a top-secret security clearance and was hustled off to Washington for a meeting in the White House situation room with President Obama, national security advisor Susan Rice, and several other people, including my former student, assistant attorney general Lisa Monaco, JD’97.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/breach">http://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/breach</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-g">Geoffrey R. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:06:32 +0000 willcanderson 25238 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Matt Maxwell, '08, To Appear in Chicago Debut of 'The Other Place' http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/matt-maxwell-08-appear-chicago-debut-other-place <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The production runs February 13 - April 5, 2015 at Profiles Theatre's The Main Stage.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.broadwayworld.com/chicago/article/THE-OTHER-PLACE-to-Make-Chicago-Premiere-at-Profiles-Theatre-213-45-20150123">http://www.broadwayworld.com/chicago/article/THE-OTHER-PLACE-to-Make-Chicago-Premiere-at-Profiles-Theatre-213-45-20150123</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Profiles Theatre continues its 26th Season with the Chicago premiere of The Other Place by Sharr White, directed by Artistic Director Joe Jahraus. The production runs February 13 - April 5, 2015 at Profiles Theatre's The Main Stage, 4139 N. Broadway. The press opening is Thursday, February 19 at 8pm.</p> <p>In Sharr White's acclaimed new drama The Other Place, Juliana Smithton, a successful neurologist, finds her life coming apart at the seams. Her husband filed for divorce, her daughter eloped with a much older man and her own health hangs in jeopardy. But in this brilliantly crafted work, nothing is as it seems. Piece by piece, a mystery unfolds as fact blurs with fiction, past collides with present and the elusive truth about Juliana boils to the surface.</p> <p>[...]</p> <p>Directed by Profiles Artistic Director Joe Jahraus, the cast of The Other Place features guest artist&nbsp;Lia D. Mortensen&nbsp;<span>as Julianna. Lia was most recently seen in Pericles with&nbsp;</span>Chicago Shakespeare Theatre<span>&nbsp;and was seen last season at Profiles in their Midwest premiere of Annapurna. Also featured are guest artists George Infantado,&nbsp;</span><strong>Matt Maxwell</strong><span>, Nina O'Keefe, Steve Silver and Autumn Teague.</span></p> Mon, 26 Jan 2015 17:10:42 +0000 willcanderson 25234 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu New Westlaw OnePass security requirements http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2015/01/22/new-westlaw-onepass-security-requirements/ Earlier this month, all Westlaw users should have received an email informing them that they need to update their OnePass password. The password updates are to ensure security and privacy. You may change your password at any time, but if &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2015/01/22/new-westlaw-onepass-security-requirements/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Thu, 22 Jan 2015 22:27:50 +0000 Todd Ito http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=26061 Steven C. Todrys, '78, Joins Evercore as a Senior Advisor http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/steven-c-todrys-78-joins-evercore-senior-advisor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Evercore announced today that Steven C. Todrys has joined the Firm’s Investment Banking business as a Senior Advisor with a focus on transactional tax and structuring solutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.marketwatch.com/story/steven-c-todrys-joins-evercore-as-a-senior-advisor-2015-01-22?reflink=MW_news_stmp">http://www.marketwatch.com/story/steven-c-todrys-joins-evercore-as-a-senior-advisor-2015-01-22?reflink=MW_news_stmp</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>NEW YORK, Jan 22, 2015 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Evercore&nbsp;announced today that Steven C. Todrys has joined the Firm’s Investment Banking business as a Senior Advisor with a focus on transactional tax and structuring solutions. He will be based in Evercore’s office in New York.</p> <p>Mr. Todrys was most recently a partner at the law firm of Simpson Thacher &amp; Bartlett LLP, where he had served as the head of the firm’s tax practice. There, he provided tax advice on many significant and complex transactions, including the sale by Vodafone of its indirect interest in Verizon Wireless, the split-off of Mosaic from Cargill, the acquisition by Mars of Wrigley, the sale of Wyeth to Pfizer, and numerous buyout transactions by KKR, Hellman &amp; Friedman and Silver Lake. Mr. Todrys is a past chair of the Tax Section of the New York State Bar Association. He holds a JD from the University of Chicago Law School and a BA from the University of Rochester.</p> <p>Ralph Schlosstein, Evercore’s Chief Executive Officer, said, “We are delighted to welcome Steve to Evercore where his experience and expertise will help us to provide the most sophisticated transaction structuring advice to our clients across all of the industry groups we serve.”</p> <p>Steven Todrys said, “I am looking forward to using the experience I have developed in my 35 years as a tax lawyer to help Evercore’s clients achieve their business objectives. Evercore’s client focus and philosophy coupled with its leading advisory capabilities provide a great platform to serve the clients’ strategic needs.”</p> Thu, 22 Jan 2015 21:23:48 +0000 willcanderson 25189 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Don't Ask, Must Tell — And Other Combinations http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/lior-strahilevitz-dont-ask-must-tell-%E2%80%94-and-other-combinations <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Strahilevitz,%20Lior%202011-07-18.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Lior Strahilevitz </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-nonfacauth"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> with:&nbsp;</div> Adam M. Samaha </div> </div> </div> <p>The military’s defunct Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy has been studied and debated for decades. Surprisingly, the question of why a legal regime would combine these particular rules for information flow has received little attention. More surprisingly still, legal scholars have provided no systemic account of why law might prohibit or mandate asking and telling. While there is a large literature on disclosure and a fragmented literature on questioning, considering either part of the information dissemination puzzle in isolation has caused scholars to overlook key considerations. This Article tackles foundational questions of information policy and legal design, focusing on instances in which asking and telling are either mandated or prohibited by legal rules, legal incentives, or social norms.</p> <p>Although permissive norms for asking and telling seem pervasive in law, the Article shows that each corner solution exists in the American legal system. “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” “Don’t Ask, Must Tell,” “Must Ask, Must Tell,” and “Must Ask, Don’t Tell” each fill a notable regulatory space. After cataloguing examples, the Article gives accounts of why law gravitates toward particular combinations of asking and telling rules in various domains, and offers some normative evaluation of these strategies. The Article emphasizes that asking and telling norms sometimes — but only sometimes — are driven by concerns about how people will use the information obtained. Understanding the connection to use norms, in turn, provides guidance for a rapidly advancing future in which big data analytics and expanding surveillance will make old practices of direct question-and-answer less significant, if not obsolete. In any event, the matrix of rule combinations highlighted here can reveal new pathways for reforming our practices of asking and telling in life and law.</p> Thu, 22 Jan 2015 21:12:06 +0000 willcanderson 25179 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Arizona and Anti-Reform http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/nicholas-stephanopoulos-arizona-and-anti-reform <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Stephanapoulos.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In this symposium contribution, then, I develop three other kinds of arguments for redistricting commissions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Nicholas Stephanopoulos </div> </div> </div> <p>The Supreme Court is on the cusp of rejecting one of the best ideas for reforming American elections: independent commissions for congressional redistricting. According to the plaintiffs in a pending case, a commission is not “the Legislature” of a state. And under the Elections Clause, it is only “the Legislature” that may set congressional district boundaries.</p> <p>There are good reasons, grounded in text and precedent, for the Court to rebuff this challenge. And these reasons are being aired effectively in the case’s briefing. In this symposium contribution, then, I develop three other kinds of arguments for redistricting commissions. Together, they illuminate the high theoretical, empirical, and policy stakes of this debate.</p> <p>First, commissions are supported by the political process theory that underlies many Court decisions. Process theory contends that judicial intervention is most justified when the political process has broken down in some way. Gerrymandering, of course, is a quintessential case of democratic breakdown. The Court itself thus could (and should) begin policing gerrymanders. And the Court should welcome the transfer of redistricting authority from the elected branches to commissions. Then the risk of breakdown declines without the Court even needing to enter this particular thicket.</p> <p>Second, commission usage leads to demonstrable improvements in key democratic values. The existing literature links commissions to greater partisan fairness, higher competitiveness, and better representation. And in a rigorous new study, spanning federal and state elections over the last forty years, I find that commissions, courts, and divided governments all increase partisan fairness relative to unified governments. At the federal level, in particular, commissions increase partisan fairness by up to fifty percent.</p> <p>And third, the implications of the plaintiffs’ position are more sweeping than even they may realize. If only “the Legislature” may draw congressional district lines, then governors should not be able to veto plans, nor should state courts be able to assess their legality. And beyond redistricting, intrusions into any other aspect of federal elections by governors, courts, agencies, or voters should be invalid as well. In short, a victory for the plaintiffs could amount to an unnecessary election law revolution.</p> Thu, 22 Jan 2015 21:03:41 +0000 willcanderson 25176 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Building Leaders http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/building-leaders <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Robin I. Mordfin </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">January 21, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>In May 2014, the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/cps/wlf-databook-2013.pdf">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a> reported that 31 percent of lawyers working in the United States were women, yet according to the <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-leadership/wp/2014/02/18/large-law-firms-are-failing-women-lawyers/"><em>Washington Post</em></a><em>, </em>only 4 percent of the 200 top law firms have female, firm-wide managing partners. Law remains a male-dominated field, and the women who enter it today are looking for ways to become leaders while maintaining their personal lives, their integrity, and their identities.</p> <p>With that in mind, a strong contingent of female law students from all three years of study gathered at the Law School for the Law Women’s Leadership Summit, which enabled them to listen and learn from a group of highly successful, highly fulfilled women attorneys. According to a survey given at the end of the summit, the students overwhelming arrived with two goals in mind – to get to know other women who are leaders on campus and to develop their leadership skills.</p> <p>“Today is the culmination of a number of conversations with female students and alumni about the unique challenges that female student organization leaders face, and that they may encounter as attorneys,” explained Dean of Students Amy M. Gardner as she opened the summit, adding that while it was helpful that similar programs had been held at other law schools, this one was specifically designed to respond to the concerns Chicago students had brought to her. “We know that six hours cannot adequately address every concern or situation you may have now or in the future, but hope today will help you add to the tools at your disposal to lead in now and in the future. We hope today helps build the community of women leaders at the Law School. The sessions have all been designed with student input and the questions the panel will answer are the ones you submitted.”</p> <p>Carrie Hightman, Executive Vice President and Chief Legal Officer of NiSource, kicked off the programming with a talk on how women’s minds work and how they approach problems.</p> <p>“I worry that women today think there are no obstacles that affect women that don’t affect men. That is not true. There are many unintentional biases, and there are differences. Men and women communicate differently, and we all gravitate to those who are like us, which means if there are men in charge they are going to be more likely to hire other men,” Hightman noted. “So be smart about opportunities, and be aware of things that can hold you back.</p> <p>Hightman asked the participants to complete two short worksheets. The first, called the Mindset quiz, determined how much growth potential individuals feel they can develop through dedication and hard work. The greater the growth mindset, the more likely the person will possess the resilience necessary for accomplishment. &nbsp;The second worksheet was the 12-Item Grit Scale, which measures a person’s tendency to maintain interest and effort in a long-term goal.</p> <p>“My mindset score is 89,” Hightman said. “Do you think it started out at 89? No, but today, I am very successful, and part of that is because I developed my growth mindset, my willingness to adapt and to keep going even when things were difficult. Grittiness and mindset are things we can cultivate and grow.”</p> <p>Four more very successful lawyers comprised the panel that followed Hightman’s talk. Kathy Morris, founder of Under Advisement, which assists law students and attorneys with job searches and career management, moderated. Suzanne Courtheoux, ’04, works with the Ombusdman Project at LAF of Metropolitan Chicago, a job she took after working with Seyfarth Shaw. Dana Davenport, ’07, also left big-firm law, and is now in-house counsel at Accenture. Magistrate Judge Mary Rowland, ’88, worked in both public service and BigLaw before becoming taking the bench, and Kristen Seeger, ’02, has spent her entire career at Sidley Austin and is now a partner.&nbsp;</p> <p>“The point here is that there is no one correct way to build a career,” Morris pointed out. “There are lots of different approaches, and you will end up where you should be.”</p> <p>Using questions that the students had previously submitted, the attorneys eagerly explained the elements they found to be most helpful to them in building their careers. Davenport explained that the biggest factor for her has been mentoring, getting to know different people in different parts of law who have helped guide her as she has faced issues and challenges while building her career.</p> <p>“You would be surprised how many people are willing to speak with you and help you along your path. Go to events, interviews, cocktail parties, everywhere there could be someone who impresses you and that you just want to get to know better. And sometimes these connections lead to opportunities,” she said.</p> <p>As for things they regret, Rowland described how as a law student, she did not use the Law School in the way she should have, as a place to ask questions and to make mistakes before the mistakes affect a client.</p> <p>“The problem is once you have clients, you have to speak up, you have to speak in court, and I didn’t really know how because I had not been practicing, I had been sitting on my hands in class afraid to make a mistake.” That, she said, is one thing that no woman should be doing.</p> <p>Courtheoux explained her career change to public-sector work by elucidating her view that it is okay to find work that creates a way of life that works for you. “I spent nine years in big firms, which is much longer than I had originally intended. But BigLaw is a particular lifestyle that didn’t really suit me. I left my job and spent a summer finding the next thing, and it was the right thing. Now I represent nursing home residents right, which is an exciting challenge, a big change, and I am so happy I did it.”</p> <p>But for those who do like BigLaw lifestyle, Kristen Seeger pointed out that is important to power through those difficult times, especially the first six years of motherhood, when things are particularly hard. “But it is so worth it, because it is much more difficult for women who have left work to come back. Still, there is more to it. When women make mistakes or have doubts, they hold themselves back with too much self-doubt that men simply don’t have, and it stops them from becoming the leaders they can be. Women need to reach higher.”</p> <p><em>For more information on <a href="http://www.americanbar.org/groups/women/initiatives_awards/grit.html">grit and growth</a> mindset go to the ABA website.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/gardner">Amy M. Gardner</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/lawschool_2014-15_2015-01-10-6682-web.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=24425">lawschool_2014-15_2015-01-10-6682-web.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 21 Jan 2015 18:04:51 +0000 beckygillespie 25089 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Tom Ginsburg on Constitutions in Latin America (Spanish Interview) http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/tom-ginsburg-constitutions-latin-america-spanish-interview <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tom Ginsburg, experto constitucional: &quot;Me gustaría saber si los chilenos creen simbólico tener una nueva Constitución&quot; </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Maximiliano Arce </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> La Segunda </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">January 20, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Desde Chicago, este académico explica los efectos de cambiar la Carta Fundamental y el rol de Bachelet.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Tom Ginsburg gave an interview in the Chilean publication <em>La Segunda</em> in anticipation of a seminar there on constitutional change.</p> <blockquote><p>"Dos cervezas, por favor" son las únicas palabras que el profesor de Derecho Internacional y Ciencias Políticas de la Universidad de Chicago, Tom Ginsburg, sabe decir en español. Desde Estados Unidos, reconoce que no sabe ninguna frase "chilena", pero que espera aprender algunas en la visita que realizará el próximo 22 de enero al seminario "Cambio Constitucional en Democracia" que organiza la Segpres.</p> <p><strong>-¿Cómo es la situación constitucional en América Latina?</strong></p> <p>-En general, están cambiando su Constitución frecuentemente. Chile es algo excepcional a esta regla, ya que a través de la historia sabemos que tienen constituciones muy largas que han funcionado en distintos regímenes.</p> </blockquote> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/ginsburg-t">Tom Ginsburg</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 20 Jan 2015 22:04:05 +0000 willcanderson 25064 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Adam Bonin, ’97, Begins Column in Philadelphia Magazine http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/adam-bonin-%E2%80%9997-begins-column-philadelphia-magazine <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In his first column for Philadelphia Magazine,&nbsp;Adam Bonin calls for an end to the judicial fundraising charade.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.phillymag.com/citified/2015/01/20/judicial-fundraising-charade/">http://www.phillymag.com/citified/2015/01/20/judicial-fundraising-charade/</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Adam Bonin, ’97, is a new columnist with Philadelphia Magazine. In his first column, he&nbsp;calls for an end to the "judicial fundraising charade":</p> <blockquote><p>It’s a part of the campaign process which gives many a sense of the oogies; the relentless quest for cash in which candidates for office call their friends, colleagues, former colleagues, ideological sympathizers, anyone who’s given money to people like them, anyone who might have a beef with the other candidates, and then, inevitably, all these same people again next week.</p> <p>It’s especially uncomfortable when it comes to candidates for judicial office, because judges are supposed to be impartial, and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.phillymag.com/citified/2015/01/20/judicial-fundraising-charade/%E2%80%9Dhttp://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=734225367963332289&amp;%E2%80%9C" target="_blank">as the U.S. Court of Appeals explained in 1991</a>:</p> <p><em>It is no secret that aside from family and close personal friends of the candidate (rarely affluent, or necessarily enthusiastic sources) judicial campaigns must focus their solicitations for funds on members of the bar. This leads to the unseemly situation in which judges preside over cases in which the parties are represented by counsel who have contributed in varying amounts to the judicial campaigns.</em></p> <p>Pennsylvania, like most states which elect judges, tries to take some of the ickiness out of the process by preventing judges (and judicial candidates, but I’ll just say “judges” from here) from raising the money themselves.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.phillymag.com/citified/2015/01/20/judicial-fundraising-charade/%E2%80%9Dhttp://judicialconductboardofpa.org/legislation/code-of-judicial-conduct/code-of-judicial-conduct-effective-7-1-2014/#4.”" target="_blank">The Rules of Judicial Conduct</a>&nbsp;expressly prohibit such personal solicitations; money can only be raised by members of the judge’s campaign committee instead.</p> <p>In practice, however, the phone calls go like this...</p> </blockquote> Tue, 20 Jan 2015 20:54:13 +0000 willcanderson 25058 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Kurt Lash, "Incorporation, Unenumerated Rights, and the 14th Amendment's Privileges and Immunities Clause" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/kurt-lash-incorporation-unenumerated-rights-and-14th-amendments-privileges-and-immunities-clau <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="