News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en D’Angelo Law Library July 4th weekend hours http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2015/06/30/dangelo-law-library-july-4th-weekend-hours/ The D&#8217;Angelo Law Library will close at 2:00 PM on Thursday, July 2, 2015 and will remain closed July 3, 4, and 5 for the holiday weekend.  The Library will reopen Monday morning, July 6 for regular summer hours, 8:00 &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2015/06/30/dangelo-law-library-july-4th-weekend-hours/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:36:13 +0000 Margaret Schilt http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=27266 Richard Epstein: 'Hard Questions on Same-Sex Marriage' http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/richard-epstein-hard-questions-same-sex-marriage <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Hard Questions on Same-Sex Marriage </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Richard A. Epstein </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Defining Ideas </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">June 29, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In my view, every time the defenders of the traditional view of marriage speak in public on behalf of a ban, they lose the support of neutral third parties.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It doesn’t take a weatherman to tell which way public opinion blows. The huge uptick of support for same-sex marriage has been&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/publics-shift-on-same-sex-marriage-was-swift-broad-1435359461">described</a>&nbsp;as swift and broad, to which we can add, in all likelihood, lasting.</p> <p>In my view, every time the defenders of the traditional view of marriage speak in public on behalf of a ban, they lose the support of neutral third parties. The problem is that they are trying to tell other people how they should lead their own lives, and are using the power of the state to do it. Their justifications are far from compelling. They talk about the need for procreation in marriage, though many straight married couples use contraceptives. They talk about the risks to parenting, when there is&nbsp;<a href="http://find.galegroup.com/gic/infomark.do?&amp;contentSet=GREF&amp;idigest=0a596d8c36a21174f41ac3dd387c3e54&amp;type=retrieve&amp;tabID=&amp;prodId=GIC&amp;docId=CP3208520245&amp;source=gale&amp;userGroupName=nysl_ce_cice&amp;version=1.0">no evidence</a>&nbsp;that suggests that gay and lesbian couples are worse parents, especially when compared to dysfunctional couples in traditional marriages or single parents of limited financial means. Their arguments against same-sex marriage thus fall flat to modern ears, so that the basic support for same-sex marriage only grows.</p> <p>The transformation of public opinion dovetails nicely with the recent Supreme Court decision in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/14pdf/14-556_3204.pdf"><em>Obergefell v. Hodges</em></a>, in which Justice Anthony Kennedy’s Olympian opinion echoed the social tidal wave in favor of same-sex marriage. Kennedy did not bother to articulate what standard of scrutiny, high or low, controls the case. In his mind, the case for an inclusive definition of marriage is so strong that the ban on same-sex marriage cannot survive under any standard of review. Analytically, however, he provided only weak answers to an even more fundamental question: What judgments should be left to democratic processes and what judgments should be insulated against majoritarian politics?</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.hoover.org/research/hard-questions-same-sex-marriage" title="http://www.hoover.org/research/hard-questions-same-sex-marriage">http://www.hoover.org/research/hard-questions-same-sex-marriage</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/epstein">Richard A. Epstein</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 14:47:36 +0000 willcanderson 28540 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu National Security, Technology, and the Separation of Powers: Law Review Conference Drills Down on Tough Questions http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/national-security-technology-and-separation-powers-law-review-conference-drills-down-tough-ques <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">June 30, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Just weeks after President Obama signed the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USA_Freedom_Act">USA Freedom Act</a> into law, and amid growing national debate over the role technology plays in the balance between national security and privacy, scholars gathered at the Law School for the annual <em>Law Review</em> symposium to examine issues ranging from cyber warfare and data surveillance to the separation of powers and the extraterritorial reach of US law.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Just weeks after President Obama signed the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USA_Freedom_Act">USA Freedom Act</a> into law, and amid growing national debate over the role technology plays in the balance between national security and privacy, scholars gathered at the Law School to examine issues ranging from cyber warfare and data surveillance to the separation of powers and the extraterritorial reach of US law.</p> <p>The annual <a href="https://lawreview.uchicago.edu/"><em>University of Chicago Law Review</em></a> symposium, “National Security: The Impact of Technology on the Separation of Powers,” was co-sponsored by the journal, the Law School, and the <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/coase-sandor">Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics</a>. For two days, scholars — including organizers Daniel Abebe, Professor of Law and Walter Mander Teaching Scholar; Richard Epstein, James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Law and Senior Lecturer; and Aziz Huq, Professor of Law and Herbert and Marjorie Fried Teaching Scholar — presented papers exploring the complex legal issues that have emerged alongside technological growth. Some of those advances — such as the government’s ability to collect phone metadata, which was curbed by the USA Freedom Act, or to conduct drone strikes — have led to significant public controversy and raised fundamental questions about individual privacy and government power.</p> <p>"National security is a fractious topic, with multiple dimensions — individual rights versus public safety, domestic politics versus international commitments," said Epstein, who spoke on the separation of powers in American foreign policy. "It was a genuine pleasure to see so many experts from different fields grapple with these issues, express their disagreements, and cooperate in a common intellectual inquiry. The participants kept to a high standard of intellectual rigor, curiosity, and openness."</p> <p>The conference sought to highlight the potentially troubling aspects of the balance of constitutional authority in the twenty-first century, said Casen Ross, ’15, an Articles Editor for the previous <em>Law Review</em> board.</p> <p>“The various branches of the government must calibrate their respective authority in novel ways," he said. "In particular, the executive branch's control of information — for instance, intelligence surveillance — has re-calibrated its position relative to the other branches, and this control of information has been enabled by incredible innovations in technology."</p> <p>Abebe, who opened the conference by exploring how constraints created by other countries’ policies should be balanced against internal limitations on the U.S. President’s cyber war-making authority, called the event “a great success.”</p> <p>&nbsp;“We brought together a wonderful group of rigorous, serious, and engaging scholars with&nbsp;thoughtful&nbsp;insights on questions related to technology, how we regulate it, and how it ties with separation of powers,” he said. “When the final drafts are in, we’ll have 12 papers that represent a wide range of&nbsp;perspectives&nbsp;on how to think about the relationship between cyberspace, national security, and&nbsp;constitutional&nbsp;authority. It’s my hope that this symposium serves as a resource for those thinking about these timely and important&nbsp;questions.”</p> <p>Added Huq, who discussed the interaction between the Fourth Amendment and the separation of powers: “We were really lucky to have the best legal scholars in the field drilling down on the hard questions of how technological change has shifted both the demands on and the dangers of executive power in recent years.”</p> <p>Michael P. Kenstowicz, ’16, the journal's Book Review and Symposium Editor, said he’s looking forward to the publication of the papers discussed at the symposium.</p> <p>“I think one of the most important takeaways from the conference was that debates about national security are often framed as presenting tradeoffs between national security and privacy, but this debate should be framed to recognize ‘privacy-privacy’ tradeoffs,” Kenstowicz said. He also walked away thinking about the importance of weighing external constraints when determining internal limitations on executive power, as well as the difficulty of applying cost-benefit analysis to national security questions due to measurement and valuation problems. He also enjoyed a session that examined in-depth the norm against economic espionage within the American intelligence community.</p> <p>“The conference significantly advanced the literature on a number of key national security questions,” he said. “I am looking forward to the <em>Law Review’s</em> publication of these essays.”</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/abebe">Daniel Abebe</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/epstein">Richard A. Epstein</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/huq">Aziz Huq</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/mgl8uyhqfmj2yyh_fbpb59aa_sl0t8bhtihbqi92shc5rpkup0gqs8o2zhlz7hhnfege_7jz07_-rhvwoeongk.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=84361">mgl8uyhqfmj2yyh_fbpb59aa_sl0t8bhtihbqi92shc5rpkup0gqs8o2zhlz7hhnfege_7jz07_-rhvwoeongk.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 13:08:33 +0000 beckygillespie 28507 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Tae Hea Nahm, '85, Interviewed in The New York Times http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/tae-hea-nahm-85-interviewed-new-york-times <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This interview with Tae Hea Nahm, managing director of the venture capital firm Storm Ventures, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/28/business/tae-hea-nahm-of-storm-ventures-a-believer-and-a-skeptic-in-one.html?_r=1" title="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/28/business/tae-hea-nahm-of-storm-ventures-a-believer-and-a-skeptic-in-one.html?_r=1">http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/28/business/tae-hea-nahm-of-storm-venture...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p><em>This interview with <strong><a title="His bio." href="http://www.stormventures.com/team/tae-hea-nahm/">Tae Hea Nahm</a>,</strong> managing director of the venture capital firm <a title="The website." href="http://www.stormventures.com">Storm Ventures</a>, was conducted and condensed by <strong>Adam Bryant. </strong></em></p> <p><strong>Q. What were some early influences for you?</strong></p> <p><strong>A.</strong> I was born in South Korea, and we immigrated to St. Louis when I was 5 years old. In the beginning, it was all about learning how to get acclimated to life in the United States. I remember starting kindergarten not being able to speak English. I felt like I was going to flunk kindergarten, but somehow survived.</p> <p><strong>Tell me about your parents.</strong></p> <p>My father was a medical school professor in Korea and became a doctor here in the United States. My mother was very hard-driving. If I got 99 on a test, the first question was, “Why didn’t you get 100?” If I got 100, the next question was, “Can you do it again?”</p> </blockquote> <p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/28/business/tae-hea-nahm-of-storm-ventures-a-believer-and-a-skeptic-in-one.html?_r=1">Read the rest</a>.</p> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 18:28:52 +0000 willcanderson 28524 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Richard Posner: Chief Justice’s Same-Sex Marriage Dissent is Heartless http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/richard-posner-chief-justice%E2%80%99s-same-sex-marriage-dissent-heartless <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Supreme Court Breakfast Table </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Richard A. Posner </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Slate </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">June 27, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Gratuitous interference in other people’s lives is bigotry.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It was no surprise that the Supreme Court held Friday that there is a constitutional right to same-sex marriage. It is very difficult to distinguish the case from&nbsp;<em>Loving v. Virginia</em>, which in 1967 invalidated state laws forbidding miscegenation. There was, as an economist would say, a “demand” (though rather limited) for biracial marriage, and it was difficult, to say the least, to comprehend why such marriages should be prohibited. In fact the only “ground” for the prohibition was bigotry. The same is true with respect&nbsp;to same-sex marriage. No more than biracial marriage does gay marriage harm people who don’t have or want to have such a marriage. The prohibition of same-sex marriage harms a nontrivial number of American citizens because other Americans disapprove of it though unaffected by it.</p> <p>John Stuart Mill in&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0486421309/?tag=slatmaga-20" target="_blank">On Liberty</a></em>&nbsp;drew an important distinction between what he called “self-regarding acts” and “other-regarding acts.” The former involves doing things to yourself that don’t harm other people, though they may be self-destructive. The latter involves doing things that do harm other people. He thought that government had no business with the former (and hence—his example—the English had no business concerning themselves with polygamy in Utah, though they hated it). Unless it can be shown that same-sex marriage harms people who are not gay (or who are gay but don’t want to marry), there is no compelling reason for state intervention, and specifically for banning same-sex marriage. The dissenters in&nbsp;<em>Obergefell</em>&nbsp;missed this rather obvious point.</p> <p>I go further than Mill. I say that gratuitous interference in other people’s lives is bigotry.&nbsp;The fact that it is often religiously motivated does not make it less so. The United States is not a theocracy, and religious disapproval of harmless practices is not a proper basis for prohibiting such practices, especially if the practices are highly valued by their practitioners. Gay couples and the children (mostly straight) that they adopt (or that one of them may have given birth to and the other adopts) derive substantial benefits, both economic and psychological, from marriage. Efforts to deny them those benefits by forbidding same-sex marriage confer no offsetting social benefits—in fact no offsetting benefits at all beyond gratifying feelings of hostility toward gays and lesbians, feelings that feed such assertions as that heterosexual marriage is “degraded” by allowing same-sex couples to “annex” the word&nbsp;<em>marriage</em>to their cohabitation.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/the_breakfast_table/features/2015/scotus_roundup/supreme_court_gay_marriage_john_roberts_dissent_in_obergefell_is_heartless.html" title="http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/the_breakfast_table/features/2015/scotus_roundup/supreme_court_gay_marriage_john_roberts_dissent_in_obergefell_is_heartless.html">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/the_breakfast_table/feat...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/posner-r">Richard A. Posner</a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 18:20:59 +0000 willcanderson 28523 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Randal C. Picker to Offer Free Online Course on Technology and Law http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/randal-c-picker-offer-free-online-course-technology-and-law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Wen Huang </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> University of Chicago News Office </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">June 29, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Picker will lead a course that explores the complex and sometimes adversarial relations between law and modern technology.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>How do government regulators around the globe scrutinize the decisions made by Internet giant Google on the controversial issue of “search market power?” What exactly is net neutrality, and what is the legal basis for implementing it in the United States? How are music, video and ebooks changing—and what do the legal fights over each look like?</p> <p>These will be some of the topics covered in a free online course that the University of Chicago will launch this summer for its alumni and the public.&nbsp;<a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/picker">Randal C. Picker</a>, AB’80, AM’82, JD’85, the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law and senior fellow at the Computation Institute, will lead a course that explores the complex and sometimes adversarial relations between law and modern technology.</p> <p>The seven-week class,&nbsp;<a rel="nofollow" href="https://youtu.be/fiDTK8uFy4o">“Internet Giants: The Law and Economics of Media Platforms,”</a>&nbsp;will be available beginning July 13.</p> <p>“Technological progress is an important source of economic growth and raises broader questions about the human condition,” said Picker, an expert on antitrust and copyright issues in high-technology industries. “And technology itself is powerfully shaped by the laws that apply in areas as diverse as copyright, antitrust, patents, privacy, speech law and the regulation of networks.”</p> <p>The course draws on three courses that Picker regularly teaches at the Law School: antitrust, copyright and network industries. Picker said the class will highlight the major legal battles that have defined how the public experiences the Internet today. By examining the memos, cases and briefs between major corporations like Microsoft, Google, Apple and Amazon, students can learn how law has shaped the technology and media platforms of our modern age.</p> <p>The course, UChicago’s first self-paced online offering, is provided through&nbsp;<a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.coursera.org/">Coursera,</a>&nbsp;an educational technology company that specializes in massive open online courses or MOOCs. It will cover seven topics:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Microsoft:</strong>&nbsp;The U.S. and European Union cases against Microsoft that arose when competition between the free-standing personal computer and the Internet world was at its height;</li> <li><strong>Google:</strong>&nbsp;The fight over Google search in the United States and Europe;</li> <li><strong>Smartphones:</strong>&nbsp;The complex legal infrastructure of smartphones and tablets and the ongoing antitrust, patent and copyright litigation among manufacturers and over the iPhone/iOS and the Android operating systems;</li> <li><strong>Net neutrality:</strong>&nbsp;The debate over network neutrality and efforts by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to produce sensible and sustainable nondiscrimination conditions for the Internet;</li> <li><strong>Music sharing:</strong>&nbsp;The history of music technology in the home (the Victrola and the player piano), the creation of radio and then the modern era: the rise of peer-to-peer music sharing and the copyright issues and litigation that have followed and then digital distribution (iTunes and Spotify);</li> <li><strong>Video—listening and watching:</strong>&nbsp;The road from government regulation of the radio spectrum to the development of cable TV, the VCR, DVDs, digital television and the challenges faced by emerging video distribution technologies like Netflix and Aereo;</li> <li><strong>Ebooks:&nbsp;</strong>The rise of the electronic book and the era of the mediated book, focusing on Google, Amazon and Apple.</li> </ul> <p>While the class is self-paced and without prescribed start dates and deadlines, the course also features a private community in which Picker and his teaching staff will guide discussions about the content for a cohort of UChicago alumni learners over a period of eight weeks. They will be able to watch additional content specifically developed for alumni, and participate in live video chats with the professor to discuss class topics and current events related to law and technology.</p> <p>Alumni can find additional information&nbsp;<a rel="nofollow" href="https://alumniandfriends.uchicago.edu/lifelong-learning/uchicago-mooc-you">here</a>. Those who are interested can sign up to be notified when&nbsp;<a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.coursera.org/course/internetgiants">the course</a>&nbsp;is available.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/picker">Randal C. Picker</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Watch Prof. Randal Picker discuss his online course, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiDTK8uFy4o&amp;feature=youtu.be">Internet Giants: The Law and Economics of Media Platforms</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/moocimage.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=67847">moocimage.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 18:02:40 +0000 willcanderson 28522 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu William H. J. Hubbard, “Newtonian Law and Economics, Quantum Law and Economics, and the Search for a Theory of Relativity” http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/william-h-j-hubbard-%E2%80%9Cnewtonian-law-and-economics-quantum-law-and-economics-and-search-theory-r <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212503932&amp;color=800000&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At this law school, “law and economics” is a mantra. But what is the “economics” in “law and economics”? There is a tendency to see research on cognitive biases and bounded rationality (“behavioral economics”) as challenging or even overturning an approach using models of rational behavior (“neo-classical economics”). With the help of an analogy to physics, I argue that such a view disserves both the enterprise of neo-classical economics and the promise of behavioral economics, and I define present and future challenges for the economic analysis of law.</p> <p>William H. J. Hubbard is Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School.</p> <p>This talk, the 2015 Coase Lecture in Law and Economics, was recorded on April 14, 2015.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-event"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Event listing:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/events/2015-04-14-2015-coase-lecture-william-hubbard">2015 Coase Lecture: William Hubbard</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-faculty"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/hubbard">William H. J. Hubbard</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related video:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/video/william-hubbard-newtonian-law-economics-quantum-law-economics-search-for-theory-of-relativity">William H. J. Hubbard, “Newtonian Law and Economics, Quantum Law and Economics, and the Search for a Theory of Relativity”</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related article:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/news/coase-lecture-hubbard-applies-physics-law-and-economics">The Coase Lecture: Hubbard Applies Physics to Law and Economics</a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:37:48 +0000 willcanderson 28520 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu William H. J. Hubbard, “Newtonian Law and Economics, Quantum Law and Economics, and the Search for a Theory of Relativity” http://www.law.uchicago.edu/video/william-hubbard-newtonian-law-economics-quantum-law-economics-search-for-theory-of-relativity <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>There is a tendency to see research on cognitive biases and bounded rationality (“behavioral economics”) as challenging or even overturning an approach using models of rational behavior (“neo-classical economics”).</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xr684A8GiaM?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>At this law school, “law and economics” is a mantra. But what is the “economics” in “law and economics”? There is a tendency to see research on cognitive biases and bounded rationality (“behavioral economics”) as challenging or even overturning an approach using models of rational behavior (“neo-classical economics”). With the help of an analogy to physics, I argue that such a view disserves both the enterprise of neo-classical economics and the promise of behavioral economics, and I define present and future challenges for the economic analysis of law.</p> <p>William H. J. Hubbard is Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School.</p> <p>This talk, the 2015 Coase Lecture in Law and Economics, was recorded on April 14, 2015.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar-position"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Right </div> </div> </div> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:32:52 +0000 willcanderson 28518 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Mark Templeton on Shell's Plans for Arctic Ocean Exploration Drilling http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/mark-templeton-shells-plans-arctic-ocean-exploration-drilling <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Find out the Latest on Shell&#039;s Plans for Arctic Ocean Exploration Drilling </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ceres </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">June 24, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Even as Shell tries to position itself as a leader on climate change, the company has been pushing full steam ahead with plans to drill in the Arctic Ocean.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/templeton">Mark Templeton</a>, Associate Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/environmental">Abrams Environmental Law Clinic</a>, joined a webinar to discuss the latest on Shell's plans for Arctic Ocean exploration drilling. <a href="http://cc.readytalk.com/play?id=3so5ql">View the recording here</a>.</p> <blockquote><p><strong>Meeting Description:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Even as Shell tries to position itself as a leader on climate change, the company has been pushing full steam ahead with plans to drill in the Arctic Ocean. Producing oil from unproven and extreme frontier areas, like the Arctic Ocean, is not consistent with what scientists tell us is necessary to prevent significant climate change impacts. Moreover, the exploration program pursued by Shell in one of the most remote and dangerous places in the world, creates significant risks for the company and the wildlife and people who live in the Arctic.</p> <p>Find out about Shell’s checkered past in its attempts to explore the Arctic. Learn about the most recent decisions on Shell’s proposals and hear from two of the leading legal experts on the material financial risks that Shell is obligated to disclose. Explore opportunitie