News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Bixenstine, '81, and Buchenroth, '74, Included on 2015 "Best Lawyers in America" List http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/bixenstine-81-and-buchenroth-74-included-2015-best-lawyers-america-l <p><strong>COLUMBUS, OH.</strong> -Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP is proud to announce that two Vorys attorneys, who are University of Chicago Law School alumni, have been included on the 2015 <em>Best Lawyers in America</em> list. Because Best Lawyers is based on an exhaustive peer-review survey in which more than 39,000 leading attorneys cast almost 3.1 million votes on the legal abilities of other lawyers in their practice areas, and because lawyers are not required or allowed to pay a fee to be listed, inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a singular honor. <em>Corporate Counsel</em> magazine has called Best Lawyers “the most respected referral list of attorneys in practice.”</p> <p>The attorneys, their practice areas and the year they graduated are listed below.</p> <ul> <li>Barton Bixenstine ’81 –Employment Law Management, Labor and Employment Litigation</li> <li>Stephen Buchenroth ’74 – Franchise Law, Real Estate Law</li> </ul> <p>One-hundred and ten attorneys from Vorys were named to the 2015 <em>Best Lawyers in America</em> List.</p> <p><strong>About Vorys:</strong> Vorys was established in 1909 and has grown to be one of the largest Ohio-based law firms with nearly 375 attorneys in six offices in Columbus, Cincinnati, Cleveland and Akron, Ohio; Washington, DC; Houston, Texas; and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Vorys currently ranks as one of the 200 largest law firms in the United States according to American Lawyer magazine. For more information, please visit <a href="http://www.vorys.com/">www.vorys.com</a>.</p> Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:29:17 +0000 willcanderson 23375 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Mary Anne Case: Ferguson is about Both Gender and Race http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/mary-anne-case-ferguson-about-both-gender-and-race <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Police Mistakes in Ferguson Involve Gender as Well as Race: The Forgotten Lessons of Los Angeles&#039; Christopher Commission </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Mary Anne Case </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Huffington Post </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">September 12, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>"Michael Brown doesn't want to be remembered for a riot," the Rev. Al Sharpton said at the shooting victim's funeral. "He wants to be remembered as the one who made America deal with how we police in the United States." Two decades ago Rodney King wanted to be remembered for the same thing. As the Justice Department and the Senate now launch investigations prompted by the tactics of the Ferguson, Missouri, police in Brown's shooting and its aftermath, we would do well to remember the lessons that the 1991 Christopher Commission drew from its investigation into the police practices that led to King's beating at the hands of the LAPD and the riots that followed. Indeed, if the nation had indeed applied the recommendations of the Christopher Commission, there might have been no need for the National Guard and Attorney General Eric Holder to go to Ferguson to quell another potential riot.</p> <p>Among the central findings of the Christopher Commission were that attitudes on gender as well as on race contributed to poor policing practices. <a href="http://www.parc.info/client_files/special%20reports/1%20-%20chistopher%20commision.pdf">According to the Commission</a>, "female LAPD officers are involved in excessive use of force at rates substantially below those of male officers." The Commission credited this to the female officers' perceived ability to be "more communicative, more skillful at deescalating potentially violent situations and less confrontational ... less personally challenged by defiant suspects and [showing] less need to deal with defiance with immediate force or confrontational language."</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mary-anne-case/police-mistakes-in-fergus_b_5793494.html" title="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mary-anne-case/police-mistakes-in-fergus_b_5793494.html">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mary-anne-case/police-mistakes-in-fergus_b...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/case">Mary Anne Case</a> </div> </div> </div> Sat, 13 Sep 2014 02:30:56 +0000 mferzige 23353 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu “Secure Communities”? Professors Evaluate Immigration Enforcement http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/%E2%80%9Csecure-communities%E2%80%9D-professors-evaluate-immigration-enforcement <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Office of Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">September 12, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Immigration is one of the most contentious political issues, and a new study by Professor Thomas J. Miles and Professor Adam B. Cox of New York University School of Law questions whether the federal government’s leading immigration enforcement program has achieved its goals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Immigration is one of the most contentious political issues, and a new study by Professor Thomas J. Miles and Professor Adam B. Cox of New York University School of Law questions whether the federal government’s leading immigration enforcement program has achieved its goals.</p> <p>The program, called Secure Communities, enables the federal government to check the immigration status of every person arrested by local police. Since its establishment in 2008, the federal government has detained more than 250,000 people pursuant to it, most of whom will eventually be deported. The Department of Homeland Security explains the program in large degree as a crime-control effort, one that allows more ready identification and removal of immigrants who commit serious offenses, beyond any violation of immigration laws. Accordingly, the government argues that the program should make communities safer. In their study, Miles and Cox evaluated this claim and found that the program had no impact on rates of violent or property crime.</p> <p><em>The Journal of Law and Economics</em>&nbsp;will publish the study later this year, and it has already attracted significant media attention, including coverage in the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/04/us/deportations-dont-lower-crime-rates-study-says.html"><em>New York Times</em></a>. Several newspapers—including the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/06/opinion/the-secure-communities-illusion.html?_r=1"><em>New York Times</em></a>, the <a href="http://www.timesdispatch.com/opinion/our-opinion/editorial-oops/article_c63ef5f9-026e-5566-b63e-c71e174bd351.html"><em>Richmond Times-Dispatch</em></a>, and the <a href="http://www.star-telegram.com/2014/09/04/6093139/feds-deportation-program-may-not.html?rh=1"><em>Fort Worth Star-Telegram</em></a>—promptly editorialized about the study’s implications for immigration policy.</p> <p>In recent years, the criminal justice and immigration systems have become increasingly enmeshed, a phenomenon that some legal scholars have dubbed the “crimmigration system.” In Secure Communities, Miles – who is the Clifton R. Musser Professor of Law and Economics and the Walter Mander Research Scholar – and Cox spied the rare opportunity to study this system with large datasets and sophisticated econometric methods.</p> <p>The Secure Communities program was rolled out across 3,000 counties on a staggered basis over several years, and in this, Miles and Cox saw the chance to test whether the program affected crime rates. “From the perspective of a social scientist, that’s awesome,” Cox said. “It gives you this really unique ability to study a federal policy that you otherwise wouldn’t have the ability to study very well.”</p> <p>In addition, the professors obtained under the Freedom of Information Act tallies of the number of people detained and deported through the program in each county and month. “The data obtained through FOIA allowed us to measure directly the times and places where the program’s intervention was largest,” Miles said. “In a manner of speaking, we saw where the policy experiment’s ‘dosage’ was largest.” The data also helped understand why the program has not had an impact of crime rates – many of the people detained and deported under the program thus far were not the most serious offenders.</p> <p>The research topic was well matched to Miles’ and Cox’s expertise. Miles teaches criminal law and holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University, as well as a J.D.&nbsp; Empirical studies of the criminal justice system are a core research activity for him. Cox teaches immigration law, and prior to joining NYU, he was a member of Law School’s faculty.&nbsp;</p> <p>The research on Secure Communities was not the duo’s first high-impact empirical collaboration. They previously wrote several articles on how judges decide voting rights cases. The study of judicial behavior is another specialty of Miles’, and Cox also teaches voting rights law. Briefs to the Supreme Court in the litigation over the constitutionality of the Voting Rights Act two years ago repeatedly cited their work.&nbsp;</p> <p>Officials at Immigration and Customs Enforcement defended Secure Communities to the <em>New York Times</em>, noting that with a recidivism rate of just under 50 percent, the program likely prevented more than 100,000 people from committing another crime.</p> <p>But Miles noted that the risk of criminal victimization as measured by crime rates, not numbers of offenses, is the relevant outcome. He also argued that their study offers a more accurate assessment: “Rather than making that hypothetical calculation, we looked at what in fact happened to crime rates in places where the program was rolled out, and in those places where the most detentions and deportations occurred.”</p> <p>He hopes the research has an impact on policy. “Government policies should be based on facts and evidence rather than based on rhetoric,” he said.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Miles and Cox’s study of Secure Communities can be read in full here:</em></p> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/miles/securecommunities"><em>http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/miles/securecommunities</em></a><em>.&nbsp;</em></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/miles">Thomas J. Miles</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/lawschool_2008-09_2008-11-11_0043.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=363064">lawschool_2008-09_2008-11-11_0043.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:50:16 +0000 willcanderson 23332 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Martha Nussbaum Comments on ISIS and Intolerance in Greek Interview http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/martha-nussbaum-comments-isis-and-intolerance-greek-interview <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> It is Wrong to Demonize All of Islam Because of ISIS </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> John Palaiologos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Kathimerini </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">September 11, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Professor Nussbaum speaks on the folly of demonizing an entire religious group, whether Jews in the 1920s or Muslims today, in this wide-ranging Greek interview.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.kathimerini.gr/782768/article/proswpa/geyma-me-thn-k/m-noysmpaoym-einai-la8os-h-daimonopoihsh-oloy-toy-islam-logw-toy-isis" title="http://www.kathimerini.gr/782768/article/proswpa/geyma-me-thn-k/m-noysmpaoym-einai-la8os-h-daimonopoihsh-oloy-toy-islam-logw-toy-isis">http://www.kathimerini.gr/782768/article/proswpa/geyma-me-thn-k/m-noysmp...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/nussbaum">Martha Nussbaum</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 11 Sep 2014 18:14:29 +0000 willcanderson 23322 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Ben-Shahar's Book "Engaging, Witty, and Above All Powerfully Argued" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/ben-shahars-book-engaging-witty-and-above-all-powerfully-argued <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Mandated Disclosure Laws -- Another Policy Failure That Politicians Can&#039;t Resist </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> George Leef </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Forbes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">September 8, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having information is good, right? Information helps people make good decisions, so it’s obvious that laws mandating disclosure of information must be a benefit to the public.</p> <p>That’s the logic behind many laws and regulations anyway. And like the logic behind many laws, it’s mistaken. So say professors Omri Ben-Shahar (University of Chicago) and Carl Schneider (University of Michigan) in their recent book&nbsp;<em>More Than You Wanted to Know: The Failure of Mandated Disclosure</em>, published in April by Princeton.</p> <p>Think about those tedious documents you so often have to sign before you can get something you want – they are the subject of this book. And while such documents are as boring as anything can be, the book is engaging, witty, and above all powerfully argued.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/georgeleef/2014/09/08/mandated-disclosure-laws-another-policy-failure-that-politicians-cant-resist/" title="http://www.forbes.com/sites/georgeleef/2014/09/08/mandated-disclosure-laws-another-policy-failure-that-politicians-cant-resist/">http://www.forbes.com/sites/georgeleef/2014/09/08/mandated-disclosure-la...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/ben-shahar">Omri Ben-Shahar</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 11 Sep 2014 16:27:16 +0000 willcanderson 23319 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Richard Epstein on Litigation Around Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's New Cash Flow http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/richard-epstein-litigation-around-fannie-mae-and-freddie-macs-new-cash-flow <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> What Happens if the Government Loses on the Third Amendment? The Senior Preferred Stock Certificates Spell Nothing But Trouble For the Government </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Richard A. Epstein </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Forbes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">September 10, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Right now litigation is going forward on multiple fronts in the multi-billion battle over who gets the billions of dollars in new cash flow and deferred tax assets now that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have both turned profitable.&nbsp; The government strategy is to draw matters out by resisting discovery and insisting that none of the private shareholders of Fannie and Freddie have standing to bring their claims.</p> <p>For over eighteen months now, I have analyzed and commented on these law suits as a consultant for several of the institutional investors who have stakes in the outcome of the litigation.&nbsp; My current judgment is that the government is on the losing end of this long-running tug-of-war for two reasons.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/richardepstein/2014/09/10/what-happens-if-the-government-loses-on-the-third-amendment-the-senior-preferred-stock-certificates-spell-nothing-but-trouble-for-the-government/" title="http://www.forbes.com/sites/richardepstein/2014/09/10/what-happens-if-the-government-loses-on-the-third-amendment-the-senior-preferred-stock-certificates-spell-nothing-but-trouble-for-the-government/">http://www.forbes.com/sites/richardepstein/2014/09/10/what-happens-if-th...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/epstein">Richard A. Epstein</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 11 Sep 2014 14:56:49 +0000 willcanderson 23315 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Justin Driver on Justice Scalia's Influence and a New Biography http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/justin-driver-justice-scalias-influence-and-new-biography <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How Scalia&#039;s Beliefs Completely Changed the Supreme Court </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Justin Driver </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The New Republic </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">September 9, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>On October 15, 1987, as Justice Antonin 
Scalia settled into his second term at the Supreme Court, he emerged from conference with his eight colleagues to discover a peculiar scene unfolding within the building’s typically staid corridors. Just outside of the conference room began a seemingly endless trail of white placards decorating the hallway carpet. On each placard, in handwritten lettering, appeared the name of a single prominent opinion that Justice William Brennan had written for the Court during his lengthy, high-profile tenure. Brennan’s law clerks had assembled the parading placards to honor the liberal hero’s thirtieth 
anniversary on the Court. As Brennan approached each sign, a law clerk later recalled, he would gleefully exclaim yet another landmark opinion’s name and then pause for a moment to recall his handiwork. Brennan was unaware that the Court’s newest member was following him only a few steps behind, grimly inspecting the assemblage of cases along the way. If Brennan was enjoying a stroll down Memory Lane, Scalia was enduring a slog up Trauma Avenue. For Scalia, Brennan’s extended run of liberal victories came at the cost of distorting the judiciary’s proper role in a democracy. When the trail of placards finally ended at Brennan’s chambers, Scalia managed to find a good-natured way of expressing his deep disagreement: “My Lord, Bill, have you got a lot 
to answer for!”</p> <p>Today, some twenty-eight years into Scalia’s justiceship, legal liberals increasingly understand that he has a considerable amount to answer for in his own right. But Scalia’s legacy, unlike Brennan’s, would not be especially apparent from aggregating the landmark opinions that he has written on the Court’s behalf. This discrepancy does not mean that Scalia’s résumé is altogether lacking in this regard. During the last decade alone, Scalia has issued major opinions redefining the Second Amendment’s protection for firearms possession in District of Columbia v. Heller and the Sixth Amendment’s Confrontation Clause in Crawford v. Washington. Even accounting for Scalia’s many memorable opinions written in dissent would inadequately trace his legal imprint.</p> <p>Instead of his influence being confined to a discrete set of writings or narrow doctrinal categories, Scalia has shaped modern American law in ways more overarching and even elemental. Elena Kagan, when she was dean of Harvard Law School, expressed this point vividly while presiding over Scalia’s return to his alma mater in 2007. “His views on textualism and originalism, his views on the role of judges in our society, on the 
practice of judging, have really transformed the terms of legal debate in this country,” Kagan said. “[Scalia] is the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about the law.” This statement can be understood to identify Scalia’s influence as occurring within at least three distinct arenas, each requiring some elaboration.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119360/scalia-court-one-reviewed-justin-driver" title="http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119360/scalia-court-one-reviewed-justin-driver">http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119360/scalia-court-one-reviewed-just...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/driver">Justin Driver</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 10 Sep 2014 19:27:32 +0000 willcanderson 23310 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Geoffrey Stone on the Rift in the ACLU Over Free Speech http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/geoffrey-stone-rift-aclu-over-free-speech <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Rift in the ACLU Over Free Speech </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Huffington Post </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">September 8, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the context of ongoing deliberations over a proposed amendment to the Constitution to authorize the government to enact laws regulating campaign expenditures and contributions, a sharp, even bitter, rift has emerged between different generations of the ACLU's leadership over the ACLU's understanding of the First Amendment. The rift is not about whether to adopt the proposed constitutional amendment (neither side of the intra-ACLU debate has endorsed it), but about the ACLU's position on the constitutionality of campaign finance reform today.</p> <p>The current leadership of the ACLU takes a strong pro-free speech position that, like the position of Justices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, and Chief Justice John Roberts, looks askance at most forms of campaign finance regulation that would limit the freedom of individuals to spend as much as they want in the political process to advance their political beliefs.</p> <p>The six individuals who led the ACLU from 1962 to 1993 endorse a rather different view. In a letter sent on September 4 to the leadership of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, they embraced a position that, like the position of Justices John Paul Stevens, David Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan, recognizes that limitations on campaign expenditures and contributions may be necessary to ensure the proper functioning of the democratic process.</p> <p>As a card-carrying member of the ACLU for 40 years and a member of the ACLU's National Advisory Council, I enthusiastically endorse the position of the collective former leadership of the organization. The sad truth is that the current leaders of the ACLU have embraced a thoughtless and reflexive conception of the First Amendment that is incompatible with the overarching values of the Constitution and, indeed, of the ACLU itself.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/the-rift-in-the-aclu-over_b_5787810.html" title="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/the-rift-in-the-aclu-over_b_5787810.html">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/the-rift-in-the-aclu-over...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-g">Geoffrey R. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 10 Sep 2014 19:01:29 +0000 willcanderson 23309 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu TMZ, Brainchild of Harvey Levin, '75, Has a "Remarkable String of Scoops" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/tmz-brainchild-harvey-levin-75-has-remarkable-string-scoops <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/10/sports/football/tmz-broke-ray-rice-donald-sterling-and-jameis-winston-stories-in-10-month-span.html?_r=0" title="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/10/sports/football/tmz-broke-ray-rice-donald-sterling-and-jameis-winston-stories-in-10-month-span.html?_r=0">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/10/sports/football/tmz-broke-ray-rice-don...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The New York <em>Times </em>notes that the website TMZ (brainchild of Harvey Levin, '75) which made a name for itself with celebrity gossip, has had a "remarkable string of scoops" in the past 10 months:</p> <blockquote><p>Last November, TMZ broke the news that the Heisman Trophy candidate Jameis Winston was being investigated by the