News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Public Interest Fellowship Frees Students to Choose Career Path http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/magazine/fall14/publicinterestfellowship <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Barbara J. Fried (née Vogelfanger), ’57, AB’54, has created the Mark and Barbara Fried Fund for Public Interest in the Law School.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Barbara J. Fried (née Vogelfanger), ’57, AB’54, has created the Mark and Barbara Fried Fund for Public Interest in the Law School. Her gift endows a one-year public interest fellowship for a Law School graduate and provides support for a second such fellowship. It is part of a larger gift to the University from Mrs. Fried, through which the College also receives funding that will be used to support internships, programming, and staffing to promote public interest careers.</p> <p>Mrs. Fried’s husband, Mark Fried, ’56, passed away in 2010. They met while he was a student at the Law School and she was an undergraduate in the College, and they married shortly after she graduated. They practiced law together for twenty years before they created the Virginia-based real estate business Fried Companies.</p> <p>One reason for her gift, Mrs. Fried says, is that career decisions today are not what they once were: “In my day, things were pretty much mapped out and you followed the prescribed plan, but today’s young people are much more flexible in their decisions about life and work, and perhaps more determined to find meaning, direction, and purpose as quickly as possible. Debt can interfere with freely choosing a path, so these fellowships let Law School graduates try out public interest work, to see whether they find a real vocation there. I’m confident that many will, and our society will be better for it.”</p> <p>Together, Mr. and Mrs. Fried served the public interest in many ways. They cofounded Innisfree Village, a residential community for developmentally disabled adults; created a therapeutic horseback riding program for children and adults with physical and mental disabilities; organized a coalition of Virginia dentists to serve uninsured patients; and helped start a scholarship program for foster children who attend community college. They served under both Democratic &nbsp;and Republican governors to make housing more affordable for all Virginians and held leadership positions in dozens of local charitable organizations throughout the state.</p> <p>Mrs. Fried currently chairs the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, serves on the Board of Visitors at the University of Virginia, is emeritus chair of the Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership at the University of Virginia, and is an emeritus trustee of the George Mason University Foundation. Mr. Fried served as a director or trustee or organizations that included the George Mason University Foundation and the Virginia Community College Foundation.</p> <p>“Barbara and Mark Fried epitomize what is great about the University of Chicago Law School,” says Dean Michael Schill. “They took their educations and became great entrepreneurs and philanthropists. Barbara’s dedication to the world of public affairs is inspiring. I am so pleased that she has taken a leadership role in supporting our efforts to train lawyers who will take on some of the world’s greatest problems and challenges.”</p> <p>Both Mr. and Mrs. Fried served on the Law School’s Visiting Committee. In 2007, they endowed the Mark and Barbara Fried Professorship at the Law School, which has been held by Emily Buss since its inception. At the time that gift was made, Mr. Fried said, “We wanted to support the work of a faculty member dealing with important social issues, and Professor Buss fits that description.”</p> <p>“The Law School—and for me, the College, too—opened many opportunities for Mark and me, and enriched the quality of our lives in so many ways,” Mrs. Fried says. “We have been happy to give back; it would be ungrateful not to. Now that our five grandchildren are in various stages of their own educations, I only hope that they will be as fortunate as Mark and I were. And if they are also lucky enough, as we were, to meet the person they want to spend their lives with, that will be a wonderful bonus.”</p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/barbarafried.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=13461">barbarafried.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-thumbnail"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/thumbnail/barbarafried-thumb.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=3802">barbarafried-thumb.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:54:36 +0000 willcanderson 23977 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Research Matters: Adam Chilton on "Do Constitutional Rights Make a Difference?" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/23964 <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facresearch-abstract"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/faculty/research/adam-chilton-do-constitutional-rights-make-difference">Do Constitutional Rights Make a Difference?</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-researchmatters-faculty"> <div class="field-label">Faculty member:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/faculty/chilton">Adam Chilton</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/chilton-adam-web.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=10936">chilton-adam-web.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research?order=nid&amp;sort=desc"><em>Research Matters</em></a><em> is a biweekly feature in which a member of the faculty talks about some of his or her latest work and its impact and relevance to law and society.</em></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Assistant Professor <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/chilton">Adam Chilton</a> wrote “<a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/adam-chilton-do-constitutional-rights-make-difference">Do Constitutional Rights Make a Difference</a>?” with <a href="http://www.law.virginia.edu/lawweb/faculty.nsf/FHPbI/2301734">Mila Versteeg</a>, an associate professor at the University of Virginia School of Law. The August 2014 paper, part of a <a href="http://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/law_and_economics_wp/">series</a> at the Law School’s <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/coase-sandor">Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics</a>, examined whether a right is better protected in practice if it is included in a country’s constitution. They focused on six political rights: to establish political parties; to strike and/or unionize; to associate and assemble; to religious freedom; to free press/expression; and to free movement.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. How did this paper originate?<br /></strong>A. Last year Mila Versteeg was visiting the law school for the fall quarter, and we had a series of conversations about whether we could find a way to empirically test whether the inclusion of a right in a constitution made a country more likely to protect that right later on. Eventually we decided we could use a method that had been developed to empirically test human rights treaties.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Which rights are most effective, and why?<br /></strong>A. We find that the more a right has to do with collective organizing, the more likely it is to be effective. The rights that are most fundamentally collective—to form political parties and to unionize—are consistently associated with better rights protection in practice. This suggests that organizations, such as political parties or trade unions, are able to help protect the rights and make sure they aren’t cracked down on or eliminated. &nbsp;In other words, because these rights establish organizations that can protect the right, these rights have a certain self-enforcing quality.&nbsp; The rights that are least collective—the rights to freedom of movement and freedom of expression—have no consistent relationship with protection. For example, North Korea, in its constitution, has an article that looks very similar to our First Amendment. It says that the country protects the right to freedom of speech and expression. Obviously, they don’t really mean it. A country might include a right to freedom of expression in its constitution, but this might just be cheap talk. Our results suggest that countries are a little more careful about saying there’s a right to political parties and a right to unionize.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Why is this an important issue to study?<br /></strong>A. Constitutions are constantly being rewritten. We see it happening with countries in the Middle East right now. Constitution-makers in these places are trying to figure out what to include and what not to include. They’re frequently given a lot of advice—such as, it’s important to protect freedom of speech or it’s important to protect freedom of religion. But it’s not clear which of those protections actually help to improve people’s lives. It might be the case that, regardless of what’s said in the documents, that governments violate rights anyway. So we wanted to see which constitutional rights actually make a difference.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. To what extent had this been studied before?<br /></strong>A. There are a handful papers that have looked at this before, but they all suffer from a few limitations. It’s only in the last few years that there’s been good data on what rights countries include in their constitutions. Also, countries don’t randomly pick which rights to include in their constitutions—there’s a selection bias. Specifically, countries that intend to respect a right in practice might be more likely to include it in their constitution. Not accounting for this kind of bias would be as if you were trying to test whether a cancer drug worked but you only gave the drug to people who were eating well and jogging. The method we use in our paper attempts to account for this. Specifically, our strategy is to find two countries with very similar constitutions, except one doesn’t have the specific right we are studying and the other does. After matching these countries with similar constitutions to each other, we examine whether the country with the constitutional right does a better job protecting that specific right.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Why did you choose these six rights?<br /></strong>A. We wanted a set of rights that are widely used in constitutions, and we wanted rights where there is data available in how well that right is protected.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. What is the takeaway?<br /></strong>A. If you want a constitution that ensures freedoms going forward, our results suggest that the best way to do that is to explicitly provide for the protections through groups independent of the government. When organizations—such as independent political parties, trade unions, labor unions, and associations more generally—are allowed to grow and flourish, its possible that they can help check against future government repression.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span> </span></p> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 23:59:42 +0000 beckygillespie 23964 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Jessica Lenahan (Gonzales), domestic violence, and the Inter-American system of human rights: online resources http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/10/21/jessica-lenahan-gonzales-domestic-violence-and-the-inter-american-system-of-human-rights-online-resources/ <a href='http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/10/21/jessica-lenahan-gonzales-domestic-violence-and-the-inter-american-system-of-human-rights-online-resources/'><img width="120" height="79" src="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/OAS-flag-120x79.png" class="attachment-post-thumbnail-image-thmb" alt="OAS flag" /></a>This Wednesday, October 22, at lunchtime in Room IV, four Law School student organizations &#8211; the Human Rights Law Society, the Immigration Law Society, the Law Women&#8217;s Caucus, and the Domestic Violence Project &#8211; present the International Human Rights Clinic&#8217;s Caroline Bettinger-Lopez &hellip; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/10/21/jessica-lenahan-gonzales-domestic-violence-and-the-inter-american-system-of-human-rights-online-resources/">Continue&nbsp;reading&nbsp;<span class="meta-nav">&raquo;</span></a> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 22:41:21 +0000 Lyonette Louis-Jacques http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=25287 Richard Epstein on "The War Against Airbnb" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/richard-epstein-war-against-airbnb <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The War Against Airbnb </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Richard A. Epstein </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Defining Ideas </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 20, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This past week, with much <a href="http://www.newsday.com/business/most-airbnb-rentals-in-new-york-illegal-attorney-general-eric-schneiderman-says-1.9510797">pomp</a> and circumstance, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed a massive report indicting the major upstart Airbnb for its dubious short-term leasing practices in New York City. Schneider thinks that his report is sufficient to nail Airbnb to the mast for its pervasive illegal conduct. But on a closer inspection the report looks more like an indictment of the City’s obsolete laws for dealing with new disruptive technology. Why complain about a business that matches many an out-of-town traveler with willing hosts, for a fee that leaves both sides happy, even after Airbnb takes its cut?</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This past week, with much&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newsday.com/business/most-airbnb-rentals-in-new-york-illegal-attorney-general-eric-schneiderman-says-1.9510797">pomp</a>&nbsp;and circumstance, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed a massive report indicting the major upstart&nbsp;Airbnb&nbsp;for its dubious short-term leasing practices in New York City. Schneider thinks that his report is sufficient to nail Airbnb to the mast for its pervasive illegal conduct. But on a closer inspection the report looks more like an indictment of the City’s obsolete laws for dealing with new disruptive technology. Why complain about a business that matches many an out-of-town traveler with willing hosts, for a fee that leaves both sides happy, even after Airbnb takes its cut?</p> <p>New York State is going after the enormously popular company now that its rental transactions have soared in recent years. Starting from virtually nothing in 2010, revenues have roughly doubled from year to year so that the business today generates about $282 million in total revenue and about $61 million in revenue to Airbnb. About 6 percent of the participating unit owners generate about 37 percent of the profits from the nearly 500,000 reservations to date. The price per unit is about the same for large and smaller renters, so that there is no sign of antitrust difficulties in a market marked by easy entry and exit. Not surprisingly, the most lucrative rentals are on Manhattan’s west side, and in those parts of Brooklyn close to Manhattan. According to Schneiderman’s report, about 72 percent of these rentals are said to be in violation of New York City’s&nbsp;<a href="http://tenant.net/Other_Laws/MDL/mdltoc.html">Multiple Dwelling Law</a>, which imposes minimum rental periods of 30 days. Units turn over far more rapidly under Airbnb. Now that Airbnb has come of age, it is critical to separate the wheat from chaff in the Schneiderman report.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.hoover.org/research/war-against-airbnb">http://www.hoover.org/research/war-against-airbnb</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/epstein">Richard A. Epstein</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 19:57:19 +0000 willcanderson 23960 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Significant Gift to University from David M. Rubenstein, '73, Will Build Rubenstein Forum http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/significant-gift-university-david-m-rubenstein-73-will-build-rubenstein-forum <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rubenstein Forum to Create Vital Space for Collaboration </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> University of Chicago News Office </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 20, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The University of Chicago will build an innovative facility designed to foster convening and collaboration and to serve as a physical hub for a broad array of University activities. In recognition of a significant new gift from alumnus and University Trustee David M. Rubenstein, JD’73, the facility will be named the David M. Rubenstein Forum.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The University of Chicago will build an innovative facility designed to foster convening and collaboration and to serve as a physical hub for a broad array of University activities. In recognition of a significant new gift from alumnus and University Trustee David M. Rubenstein, JD’73, the facility will be named the David M. Rubenstein Forum.</p> <p>This new building, slated for completion in 2018, will host academic conferences, workshops, lectures, meetings, ceremonies and other types of gatherings that entail formal and informal interaction and that benefit from a dynamic, technologically advanced environment. As a hub, it will bring together members of the University community along with visiting scholars, distinguished guests, alumni and others.</p> <p>“The regular and rigorous exchange of ideas that is a hallmark of the University of Chicago will soon be aided by a much needed physical space in which people from all parts of campus, the broader University community and visitors from around the world may gather, collaborate and interact. By offering new physical capacity for convening and exchange, the David M. Rubenstein Forum will contribute significantly to the University’s character as an intellectual destination,” said President Robert J. Zimmer. “We are deeply grateful for David Rubenstein for his leadership and support.”</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://news.uchicago.edu/article/2014/10/20/rubenstein-forum-create-vital-space-collaboration">http://news.uchicago.edu/article/2014/10/20/rubenstein-forum-create-vital-space-collaboration</a></p> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 19:39:55 +0000 willcanderson 23958 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Jeremy Mallory, 07, Joins Massey & Gail http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/jeremy-mallory-07-joins-massey-gail <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?ca=11f7d4dd-dd2f-4b75-aa39-9574254dbcc6&amp;c=08383240-57e7-11e4-81a2-d4ae527548e1&amp;ch=0884f2b0-57e7-11e4-81aa-d4ae527548e1">http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?ca=11f7d4dd-dd2f-4b75-aa39-9574254dbcc6&amp;c=08383240-57e7-11e4-81a2-d4ae527548e1&amp;ch=0884f2b0-57e7-11e4-81aa-d4ae527548e1</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As our work for clients continues to expand, Massey &amp; Gail is delighted to announce that Eli Kay-Oliphant and Jeremy Mallory have joined the firm.</p> <p>Jeremy is a member of the Illinois bar, and holds a doctorate in ethics. He graduated with honors and Order of the Coif in 2007 from the University of Chicago Law School, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the Law Review, and where he has since taught Constitutional Law. Jeremy clerked for the Honorable Diane P. Wood of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals before working for Sidley Austin and Kirkland &amp; Ellis. On starting at Massey &amp; Gail, Jeremy began working nearly full-time on a $13 million California state court case that Massey &amp; Gail was hired to take to trial after settlement talks stalled.</p> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:24:45 +0000 willcanderson 23955 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Partisan Gerrymandering and the Efficiency Gap http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/nicholas-stephanopoulos-partisan-gerrymandering-and-efficiency-gap <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Stephanapoulos.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Nicholas Stephanopoulos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-nonfacauth"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> with:&nbsp;</div> Eric McGhee </div> </div> </div> <p><span>The usual legal story about partisan gerrymandering is relentlessly pessimistic. The courts did not even recognize the cause of action until the 1980s; they have never struck down a district plan on this basis; and four sitting Justices want to vacate the field altogether. The Supreme Court’s most recent gerrymandering decision, however, is the most encouraging development in this area in a generation. Several Justices expressed interest in the concept of partisan symmetry — the idea that a plan should treat the major parties symmetrically in terms of the conversion of votes to seats — and suggested that it could be shaped into a legal test.</span></p> <p><span>In this Article, we take the Justices at their word. First, we introduce a new measure of partisan symmetry: the efficiency gap. It represents the difference between the parties’ respective wasted votes in an election, divided by the total number of votes cast. It captures, in a single tidy number, all of the packing and cracking decisions that go into a district plan. It also is superior to the metric of gerrymandering, partisan bias, that litigants and scholars have used until now. Partisan bias can be calculated only by shifting votes to simulate a hypothetical tied election. The efficiency gap eliminates the need for such counterfactual analysis.</span></p> <p><span>Second, we compute the efficiency gap for congressional and state house plans between 1972 and 2012. Over this period as a whole, the typical plan was fairly balanced and neither party enjoyed a systematic advantage. But in recent years — and peaking in the 2012 election — plans have exhibited steadily larger and more pro-Republican gaps. In fact, the plans in effect today are the most extreme gerrymanders in modern history. And what is more, several likely will remain extreme for the remainder of the decade, as indicated by our sensitivity testing.</span></p> <p><span>Finally, we explain how the efficiency gap could be converted into doctrine. We propose setting thresholds above which plans would be presumptively unconstitutional: two seats for congressional plans and eight percent for state house plans, but only if the plans probably will stay unbalanced for the rest of the cycle. Plans with gaps above these thresholds would be unlawful unless states could show that the gaps either resulted from the consistent application of legitimate policies, or were inevitable due to the states’ political geography. This approach would neatly slice the Gordian knot the Court has tied for itself, explicitly replying to the Court’s “unanswerable question” of “how much political...effect is too much.”</span></p> Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:57:35 +0000 willcanderson 23951 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Aligning Campaign Finance Law http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/nicholas-stephanopoulos-aligning-campaign-finance-law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Stephanapoulos.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Nicholas Stephanopoulos </div> </div> </div> <p><span>Campaign finance law is in crisis. In a series of recent decisions, the Supreme Court has rejected state interests such as anti-distortion and equality, while narrowing the anti-corruption interest to its quid pro quo core. This core cannot sustain the bulk of campaign finance regulation. As a result, an array of contribution limits, expenditure limits, and public financing programs have been struck down by the Court. If any meaningful rules are to survive, a new interest capable of justifying them must be found.</span></p> <p><span>This Article introduces just such an interest: the alignment of voters’ policy preferences with their government’s policy outputs. Alignment is a value of deep democratic significance. If it is achieved, then voters’ views are heeded, not ignored, by their elected representatives. Alignment also is distinct from the interests the Court previously has rebuffed. In particular, alignment and equality are separate concepts because equal voter influence is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for alignment to arise. And there is reason to think the Court might be drawn to alignment. In decisions spanning several decades, the Court often has affirmed that public policy ought to reflect the wishes of the people.</span></p> <p><span>It is not enough, though, if alignment is merely an appealing value. For it to justify regulation, money in politics must be able to produce misalignment, and campaign finance reform must be able to promote alignment. The Article draws on a new wave of political science scholarship to establish both propositions. This work shows that individual donors are ideologically polarized, while parties and PACs are more centrist in their giving. The work also finds that politicians tend to adhere to the same positions as their principal funders. Accordingly, policies that curb the influence of individual donors would be valid under the alignment approach. But measures that burden more moderate entities could not be sustained on this basis.</span></p> Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:54:52 +0000 willcanderson 23950 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Brian P. Brooks, '94, Appointed Fannie Mae Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/brian-p-brooks-94-appointed-fannie-mae-executive-vice-president-gene <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>Fannie Mae has appointed Brian P. Brooks, 45, as executive vice president, general counsel, and corporate secretary effective November 10.&nbsp;</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.fanniemae.com/portal/about-us/media/corporate-news/2014/6183.html">http://www.fanniemae.com/portal/about-us/media/corporate-news/2014/6183.html</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>WASHINGTON, DC – Fannie Mae (FNMA/OTC) a