News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en "The Gosnell Murder Conviction: Abortion, Infanticide, and Looking Beyond the Masks of the Law" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/gosnell-murder-conviction-abortion-infanticide-and-looking-beyond-masks-law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146156139&amp;color=800000&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span>Professor Duncan is the Sherman S. Welpton Professor of Law at the University of Nebraska College of Law. He received his B.A. from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst) in 1973. In 1976, he received his J.D. from the Cornell Law School, where he served on the Board of Editors of the Cornell Law Review. From 1976-1979, Professor Duncan worked as an associate at White &amp; Case in New York City. He currently teaches Property and Constitutional Law and has written and spoken on legal issues involving federalism, liberty, religious freedom, and the right to life. This talk was recorded on April 8, 2014, and sponsored by Law Students for Life and the Federalist Society.</span></p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 21:53:22 +0000 arester 21602 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Martii Koskenniemi on Human Rights: An Empirical Perspective http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/eric-posner-martii-koskenniemi-human-rights-empirical-perspective <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Posner,%20Eric.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span><br /></span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Eric Posner </div> </div> </div> <p>Martii Koskenniemi argues that human rights law is indeterminate, and that arguments based on human rights unavoidably reflect the policy preferences of the speaker. I connect this argument to empirical evidence of the failure of international human rights treaties to improve human rights in countries that have ratified them. I argue that many features of the human rights regime that are celebrated by lawyers — the large number of treaties, the vast number of rights, the large amount of institutionalization, and the involvement of NGOs — actually reflect the failure of the regime. Governments tolerate these developments because they add to the indeterminacy of the legal regime, freeing them to act in the public interest when they are motivated to do so.</p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 21:24:29 +0000 arester 21597 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Geof Stone on NSA Oversight http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/geof-stone-nsa-oversight <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Here’s Who Should Watch the Watchmen </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Daily Beast </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 23, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p><span>As a member of the President’s Review Group on NSA surveillance, I had a rare opportunity last fall to observe and evaluate the various mechanisms our government uses to oversee the activities of our nation’s intelligence agencies. At the structural level, I was impressed with the variety and range of oversight mechanisms in place.</span></p> <p>The National Security Agency’s activities, for example, are overseen by the NSA’s Inspector General, the Director of National Intelligence, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, the Department of Justice, the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, and the Senate and House Intelligence Committees. Each of these entities is responsible for reviewing various aspects of the NSA’s operations.</p> <p>Cumulatively, I found that these oversight mechanisms work reasonably well when it comes to ensuring that the NSA properly implements the authorities it has been given. In those instances in which the NSA overstepped its bounds, these entities were generally quick to respond.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/04/23/here-s-who-should-watch-the-watchmen.html" title="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/04/23/here-s-who-should-watch-the-watchmen.html">http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/04/23/here-s-who-should-watch...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-g">Geoffrey R. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 19:46:35 +0000 arester 21593 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Chicago Reader on Young Center's Benefit http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/chicago-reader-young-centers-benefit <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Help the U. of C.&#039;s Young Center help immigrant children </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Aimee Levitt </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chicago Reader </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 22, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p><span>On Sunday, the&nbsp;</span><em>New York Times</em><span>&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/nyregion/a-12-year-olds-trek-of-despair-ends-in-a-noose-at-the-border.html?ref=jimdwyer">ran the chilling story of Noemi Álvarez Quillay</a><span>, a 12-year-old girl who attempted, twice, to travel alone and without papers from her home in the southern highlands of Ecuador to join her parents in New York. The first time, she got as far as Nicaragua and then turned back. The second time, she made it all the way to Ciudad Juárez in Mexico where last month she and a coyote, a human smuggler, were apprehended. The authorities placed Noemi into a children's detention center where, a few days later, she hung herself.</span></p> <p>Noemi was just one of the 60,000 unaccompanied immigrant children expected to arrive—or attempt to arrive—in the U.S. this year. That's three times as many as last year and ten times as many as the year before that. Many of the immigrants, like Noemi, come from Central America which has been suffering from drought.</p> <p>Not many resources exist to help unaccompanied children navigate the immigration system. One of the few is the&nbsp;<a href="http://theyoungcenter.org/">Young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights</a>&nbsp;at the University of Chicago, which pairs children up with advocates who work to keep them from being deported and to find a place in America. Tonight the Young Center is hosting a benefit so it can keep doing its work. It will feature a the writer Anchee Min, herself an immigrant who was deported.</p> <p>Most kids get "detention fatigue," explains Xiaorong Jajah Wu, a staff attorney at the Young Center, and tell their state-assigned lawyers that they want to be sent back to their home countries, even if that's not necessarily in their best interest. (There are currently no "best interest" laws on the books in the U.S. for child immigrants.) The Young Center works with both the kids and the lawyers to insure that whatever happens is best for the kid; if they do end up returning home, the center does a home study to make sure conditions are safe. The advocates also work with immigrant communities to find people to talk with the kids in their own languages and make them feel more comfortable.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2014/04/22/help-the-u-of-cs-young-center-help-immigrant-children" title="http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2014/04/22/help-the-u-of-cs-young-center-help-immigrant-children">http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2014/04/22/help-the-u-of-c...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/wu">Jajah Wu</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 18:13:24 +0000 arester 21586 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Carol Ruth Silver '64 to Sign Copies of 'Freedom Rider Diary' on Campus Tomorrow http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/carol-ruth-silver-64-sign-copies-freedom-rider-diary-campus-tomorrow <p><span>From a bookstore press release:</span></p> <blockquote><p>On&nbsp;Thursday April 24th&nbsp;from 3:00-4:30PM&nbsp;University of Chicago alumna&nbsp;Carol&nbsp;Ruth&nbsp;Silver&nbsp;will be at the University of Chicago Bookstore signing copies of her book&nbsp;<em>Freedom Rider Diary: Smuggled Notes from Parchman Prison.</em><br />&nbsp;<br />Post graduation, UChicago law student,&nbsp;Carol&nbsp;Ruth&nbsp;Silver&nbsp;fought for her beliefs on thefrontlines of the civil rights movement by joining the Mississippi Freedom Riders. During the summer of 1961 she and fellow activists&nbsp;rode interstate buses into the segregated South to challenge U.S. Supreme Court rulings outlawing segregation in interstate bus and terminal facilities.&nbsp;Though peaceful in their protests, Freedom Riders faced brutal responses from local mobs and police forces including mob attacks, interventions, and arrests. At the age of 22,&nbsp;Carol&nbsp;Ruth&nbsp;Silver&nbsp;was among the targeted riders, imprisoned for forty days in Mississippi jails including Parchman Prison Farm’s infamous Maximum Security Unit. Despite constant surveillance&nbsp;Carol&nbsp;managed to document her experiences on scraps of paper, which she hid, smuggled, and later compiled into this eye-opening account.&nbsp;Freedom Rider Diary offers an in-depth view of the history of the Freedom Riders from the previously less accessible female perspective.</p> </blockquote> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 18:09:28 +0000 arester 21583 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Thomas Drueke, Faculty Services and Scholarly Communications Librarian http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/04/22/thomas-drueke-faculty-services-and-scholarly-communications-librarian/ The D&#8217;Angelo Law Library welcomes Thomas Drueke, our new Faculty Services and Scholarly Communications Librarian.  Many of you will recognize Thomas &#8211; he has spent the last 2 years working the Circulation Desk nights and weekends while finishing his Masters &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/04/22/thomas-drueke-faculty-services-and-scholarly-communications-librarian/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 21:46:58 +0000 Margaret Schilt http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=24149 Eric Posner on Russia and US Bank Sanctions http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty/~3/pegFkLtQDGY/eric-posner-on-russia-and-us-bank-sanctions.html <p>On his blog, Posner gets input from a colleague on <a href="http://ericposner.com/can-russia-oppose-u-s-bank-sanctions-through-the-wto/" target="_self">whether Russia can oppose U.S. bank sanctions through the WTO</a>.</p><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:gIN9vFwOqvQ"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:gIN9vFwOqvQ" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:dnMXMwOfBR0"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=dnMXMwOfBR0" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?i=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:l6gmwiTKsz0"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=l6gmwiTKsz0" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?a=pegFkLtQDGY:v4BW_RRr0NE:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/UChicagoLawFaculty/~4/pegFkLtQDGY" height="1" width="1"/> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:31:18 +0000 UChicagoLaw tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00d8341c031153ef01a3fcf47982970b Mike Hilgers '04 Running for Nebraska Attorney General http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/mike-hilgers-04-running-nebraska-attorney-general <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/statehouse/six-vying-to-replace-bruning-as-attorney-general/article_99f69b99-8642-5892-a6a4-1ccd3adaef27.html" title="http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/statehouse/six-vying-to-replace-bruning-as-attorney-general/article_99f69b99-8642-5892-a6a4-1ccd3adaef27.html">http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/statehouse/six-vying-to-r...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>From the <em>Lincoln Journal-Star</em>:</p> <blockquote><p>In the most wide-open race for attorney general in recent memory, six people are vying to become Nebraska's next top law enforcement officer.</p> <p>The candidates seeking to succeed Republican Attorney General Jon Bruning, who is&nbsp;running for governor, are Republicans Doug Peterson, Pete Pirsch, Brian Buescher and Mike Hilgers and Democrats Allan Eurek and Janet Stewart.</p> <p>Here's a round-up of their positions, mostly pulled from answers to the Journal Star Voter's Guide questionnaire...</p> <p><strong>Mike Hilgers,</strong>&nbsp;34, is a founding partner of Gober Hilgers, a law firm with offices in Nebraska, Dallas, Austin, Texas, and Washington, D.C. He ran unsuccessfully for the Legislature in 2012.</p> <p>"I am running to help restore the rule of law," Hilgers said. "The attorney general is one of the last lines of defense against the intrusion of unelected bureaucrats in Washington, D.C. I will lead that fight. I am also running to ensure that our county attorneys, sheriffs and troopers have the resources they need to keep our communities safe."</p> </blockquote> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:42:31 +0000 arester 21515 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Congressman Michael Quigley on MSM Blood Donation Ban http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/congressman-michael-quigley-msm-blood-donation-ban <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/145802149&amp;color=800000&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Congressman Michael Quigley is a graduate of the Harris School of Policy. He is the Congressman for Illinois's 5th District. Con. Quigley is outspoken against the FDA's ban against blood donation and will be at the law school to share his stance and answer questions from the audience.</p> <p>This talk was recorded on March 31, 2014, and was sponsored by Outlaw, the Food Law Society, Law School Democrats, ACS, &amp; ACLU.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-event"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Event listing:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/events/2014-03-31-outlaw-food-law-society-law-school-democrats-acs-aclu-present-congressman-michael-">Outlaw, Food Law Society, Law School Democrats, ACS, &amp; ACLU present Congressman Michael Quigley on MSM Blood Donation Ban</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related article:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/news/lgbt-week-focuses-%E2%80%9Cfringe%E2%80%9D">LGBT Week Focuses on the “Fringe” </a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:39:21 +0000 arester 21504 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Foreign Sovereign Immunity and Comparative Institutional Competence http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/adam-chilton-foreign-sovereign-immunity-and-comparative-institutional-competence <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Screen%20Shot%202013-09-19%20at%2010.29.41%20AM.png </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Adam Chilton </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-nonfacauth"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> with:&nbsp;</div> Christopher A. Whytock </div> </div> </div> <p>Policymakers and legal scholars routinely make comparative institutional competence claims — claims that one branch of government is better at performing a specified function than another, and that the more competent branch should be in charge of that function. Such claims pervade American law and policy; but they are rarely evaluated with rigor.</p> <p>We take advantage of an unusual legislative experiment to conduct what we believe to be the first systematic empirical analysis of the comparative institutional competence of the executive branch and the judiciary in a critical field of American law and policy: U.S. foreign relations. From 1952 to 1976, the U.S. State Department decided whether foreign nations would receive sovereign immunity from suits in U.S. courts. Based on the perception that the State Department’s immunity decisions were too influenced by political considerations, Congress passed the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act of 1976 (the “FSIA”), which transferred imm