News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Lecturer John Paul Rollert in the 'Paris Review' on Reclaiming Shakespeare for the Common People http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/lecturer-john-paul-rollert-paris-review-reclaiming-shakespeare-common-people <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Shakespeare, Heartthrob </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> John Paul Rollert </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Paris Review </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 23, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>There was a time when attending a motion picture was not an occasion but an event. Most of the great movie houses that might remind us—the Roxy in Times Square, Fox Theater in San Francisco, the Loews Palace in DC—are long gone, but the Music Box remains. A local landmark on Chicago’s North Side, the theater still has its Austrian curtains, house organ, and even a hoary legend: the ghost of Whitey, the house manager who ran the theater from opening night in 1929 until Thanksgiving eve, 1977, when he lay down for a cat nap and passed away in the lobby.</p> <p>The Music Box is an 800-seat theater, more than three times the size of Donmar Warehouse, another theater nearly four thousand miles away in London. What brought the two houses together was Shakespeare’s&nbsp;<em>Coriolanus</em>. A recent performance at the Donmar was beamed live, and later rerun, to cinemas all over the world as part of Britain’s&nbsp;<em>National Theatre Live</em>&nbsp;series. It was the first time the Music Box telecasted a production that completely sold out.</p> <p>In Shakespeare’s canon,&nbsp;<em>Coriolanus</em>&nbsp;sits somewhere between rarely remembered plays like&nbsp;<em>Pericles</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Two Gentlemen of Verona</em>&nbsp;and stock selections like&nbsp;<em>King Lear</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Romeo and Juliet</em>. A story of pride and political intrigue plucked from Plutarch’s&nbsp;<em>Lives</em>, the play is a little like an olive: a bitter fruit from Rome and something of an acquired taste. Its title character is one of Shakespeare’s great creations—for an accomplished actor, a role almost as inevitable as Iago or Macbeth. T.S. Eliot called the play “Shakespeare’s most assured artistic success;” he admired it so much he wrote two “Coriolan” poems with an eye toward an unfinished tetralogy.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2014/04/23/shakespeare-heartthrob/" title="http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2014/04/23/shakespeare-heartthrob/">http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2014/04/23/shakespeare-heartthrob/</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/rollert">John Paul Rollert</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 24 Apr 2014 20:57:20 +0000 arester 21613 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Lecturer John Paul Rollert in 'The Atlantic' on Shakespeare as an Actor http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/lecturer-john-paul-rollert-atlantic-shakespeare-actor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Was Shakespeare a Good Actor? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> John Paul Rollert </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Atlantic </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 23, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, today, will bring an outpouring of written appreciations for his works. Many, though, will likely omit or only fleetingly mention one fact: Shakespeare’s first acts of creation were not poems or plays, but the characters he gave life to as a struggling actor.</p> <p>This is no small omission. The stage is where Shakespeare taught others to lose sight of him, where he taught himself to lose sight of Shakespeare. The first lesson served him as a player, the second as a playwright. Omit the stage, and you omit the origin of William Shakespeare.</p> <p>* * *</p> <p>The widespread disregard of Shakespeare’s acting career stems, in part, from the low esteem in which actors were held long before, and long after, Shakespeare strode the stage. When he joined the profession sometime in the mid-1580s, actors were already marked as undesirables by England’s vagrancy laws, which mandated that traveling troupes had to find aristocratic patronage. Rogue players ran the risk of being flogged, branded, and finally hanged. The harsh law was rarely enforced in full, but it reflected published mores and polite opinion, both of which held actors as a hybrid of panhandler and whore. Even playwrights scorned them. “Yes, trust them not,” counseled one:</p> <blockquote><p>for there is an upstart crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his “Tiger’s heart wrapt in a player’s hide” supposes he is as well able to bombast out blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.&nbsp;</p> </blockquote> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/04/shakespeares-brilliant-forgotten-acting-career/361093/" title="http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/04/shakespeares-brilliant-forgotten-acting-career/361093/">http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/04/shakespeares-br...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/rollert">John Paul Rollert</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 24 Apr 2014 20:51:07 +0000 arester 21612 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Geof Stone Responds to National Review Editorial Attacking Justice Sotomayor http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/geof-stone-responds-national-review-editorial-attacking-justice-sotomayor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The National Review, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and Affirmative Action </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Huffington Post </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 24, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>In a stunningly insulting editorial, the&nbsp;<em>National Review&nbsp;</em>attacked Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor for her opinion dissenting from the Supreme Court's recent decision upholding the constitutionality of a state's ban on affirmative action. The<em>National Review</em>&nbsp;decried Sotomayor's opinion as "Orwellian," as "legally illiterate and logically indefensible," and as "a case study in . . . moral and legal corrosion." It accused her of "elevating ethnic-identity politics over the law" and of being "a naked and bare-knuckled political activist with barely even a pretense of attending to the law," and it mocked her as a "self-described 'wise Latina.'"</p> <p>Of course, the&nbsp;<em>National Review&nbsp;</em>has every right under the First Amendment to say all of these things, and I would defend to the death, in Voltaire's words, its right to say them. But that does not make them any less offensive -- or ignorant of the law.</p> <p>What was the issue in&nbsp;<em>Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action</em>? In 2003, the Supreme Court, in&nbsp;<em>Grutter v. Bollinger</em>, held that the University of Michigan could constitutionally take race into account in its admissions policies in order to increase the diversity of its student body if it did so in a careful and precise manner. Thereafter, the state of Michigan enacted Proposal 2, which prohibited all public educational institutions in the state from using preferences based on race, gender, or national origin in their admissions policies.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/the-national-review-justi_b_5206904.html" title="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/the-national-review-justi_b_5206904.html">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/the-national-review-justi...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-g">Geoffrey R. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 24 Apr 2014 20:39:23 +0000 arester 21611 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Lior Strahilevitz, "Personalizing Default Rules and Disclosure with Big Data" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/lior-strahilevitz-personalizing-default-rules-and-disclosure-big-data <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146303122&amp;color=800000&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span>The laws of intestacy are the same for men and women even though preferences for how one's estate should be divided differ by gender. Peanut-allergic octogenarian men and gluten-allergic pregnant women see the same warnings on consumer products even though they are interested in seeing information that is much better tailored to them. Companies have made enormous strides in studying and classifying groups of consumers, and yet almost none of this information is put to use by providing consumers with contractual default terms or disclosures that are tailored to their preferences and attributes. This lecture will explore the costs and benefits of personalizing various parts of American law and business practices. This talk was recorded on April 7, 2014. Lior Strahilevitz is Sidley Austin Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School.</span></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-event"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Event listing:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/events/2014-04-07-chicagos-best-ideas-professor-lior-strahilevitz-personalizing-default-rules-and-di">Chicago&#039;s Best Ideas: Professor Lior Strahilevitz, &quot;Personalizing Default Rules and Disclosure with Big Data&quot;</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-faculty"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/strahilevitz">Lior Strahilevitz</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related video:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/video/strahilevitz040714">Lior Strahilevitz, &quot;Personalizing Default Rules and Disclosure with Big Data&quot;</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 24 Apr 2014 20:22:22 +0000 arester 21609 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Richard Duncan, "The Gosnell Murder Conviction: Abortion, Infanticide, and Looking Beyond the Masks of the Law" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/richard-duncan-gosnell-murder-conviction-abortion-infanticide-and-looking-beyond-masks-law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146156139&amp;color=800000&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span>Professor Duncan is the Sherman S. Welpton Professor of Law at the University of Nebraska College of Law. He received his B.A. from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst) in 1973. In 1976, he received his J.D. from the Cornell Law School, where he served on the Board of Editors of the Cornell Law Review. From 1976-1979, Professor Duncan worked as an associate at White &amp; Case in New York City. He currently teaches Property and Constitutional Law and has written and spoken on legal issues involving federalism, liberty, religious freedom, and the right to life. This talk was recorded on April 8, 2014, and sponsored by Law Students for Life and the Federalist Society.</span></p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 21:53:22 +0000 arester 21602 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Martii Koskenniemi on Human Rights: An Empirical Perspective http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/eric-posner-martii-koskenniemi-human-rights-empirical-perspective <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Posner,%20Eric.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span><br /></span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Eric Posner </div> </div> </div> <p>Martii Koskenniemi argues that human rights law is indeterminate, and that arguments based on human rights unavoidably reflect the policy preferences of the speaker. I connect this argument to empirical evidence of the failure of international human rights treaties to improve human rights in countries that have ratified them. I argue that many features of the human rights regime that are celebrated by lawyers — the large number of treaties, the vast number of rights, the large amount of institutionalization, and the involvement of NGOs — actually reflect the failure of the regime. Governments tolerate these developments because they add to the indeterminacy of the legal regime, freeing them to act in the public interest when they are motivated to do so.</p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 21:24:29 +0000 arester 21597 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Geof Stone on NSA Oversight http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/geof-stone-nsa-oversight <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Here’s Who Should Watch the Watchmen </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Daily Beast </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 23, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p><span>As a member of the President’s Review Group on NSA surveillance, I had a rare opportunity last fall to observe and evaluate the various mechanisms our government uses to oversee the activities of our nation’s intelligence agencies. At the structural level, I was impressed with the variety and range of oversight mechanisms in place.</span></p> <p>The National Security Agency’s activities, for example, are overseen by the NSA’s Inspector General, the Director of National Intelligence, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, the Department of Justice, the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, and the Senate and House Intelligence Committees. Each of these entities is responsible for reviewing various aspects of the NSA’s operations.</p> <p>Cumulatively, I found that these oversight mechanisms work reasonably well when it comes to ensuring that the NSA properly implements the authorities it has been given. In those instances in which the NSA overstepped its bounds, these entities were generally quick to respond.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/04/23/here-s-who-should-watch-the-watchmen.html" title="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/04/23/here-s-who-should-watch-the-watchmen.html">http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/04/23/here-s-who-should-watch...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-g">Geoffrey R. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 19:46:35 +0000 arester 21593 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Chicago Reader on Young Center's Benefit http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/chicago-reader-young-centers-benefit <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Help the U. of C.&#039;s Young Center help immigrant children </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Aimee Levitt </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chicago Reader </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 22, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p><span>On Sunday, the&nbsp;</span><em>New York Times</em><span>&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/nyregion/a-12-year-olds-trek-of-despair-ends-in-a-noose-at-the-border.html?ref=jimdwyer">ran the chilling story of Noemi Álvarez Quillay</a><span>, a 12-year-old girl who attempted, twice, to travel alone and without papers from her home in the southern highlands of Ecuador to join her parents in New York. The first time, she got as far as Nicaragua and then turned back. The second time, she made it all the way to Ciudad Juárez in Mexico where last month she and a coyote, a human smuggler, were apprehended. The authorities placed Noemi into a children's detention center where, a few days later, she hung herself.</span></p> <p>Noemi was just one of the 60,000 unaccompanied immigrant children expected to arrive—or attempt to arrive—in the U.S. this year. That's three times as many as last year and ten times as many as the year before that. Many of the immigrants, like Noemi, come from Central America which has been suffering from drought.</p> <p>Not many resources exist to help unaccompanied children navigate the immigration system. One of the few is the&nbsp;<a href="http://theyoungcenter.org/">Young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights</a>&nbsp;at the University of Chicago, which pairs children up with advocates who work to keep them from being deported and to find a place in America. Tonight the Young Center is hosting a benefit so it can keep doing its work. It will feature a the writer Anchee Min, herself an immigrant who was deported.</p> <p>Most kids get "detention fatigue," explains Xiaorong Jajah Wu, a staff attorney at the Young Center, and tell their state-assigned lawyers that they want to be sent back to their home countries, even if that's not necessarily in their best interest. (There are currently no "best interest" laws on the books in the U.S. for child immigrants.) The Young Center works with both the kids and the lawyers to insure that whatever happens is best for the kid; if they do end up returning home, the center does a home study to make sure conditions are safe. The advocates also work with immigrant communities to find people to talk with the kids in their own languages and make them feel more comfortable.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2014/04/22/help-the-u-of-cs-young-center-help-immigrant-children" title="http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2014/04/22/help-the-u-of-cs-young-center-help-immigrant-children">http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2014/04/22/help-the-u-of-c...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/wu">Jajah Wu</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 18:13:24 +0000 arester 21586 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Carol Ruth Silver '64 to Sign Copies of 'Freedom Rider Diary' on Campus Tomorrow http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/carol-ruth-silver-64-sign-copies-freedom-rider-diary-campus-tomorrow <p><span>From a bookstore press release:</span></p> <blockquote><p>On&nbsp;Thursday April 24th&nbsp;from 3:00-4:30PM&nbsp;University of Chicago alumna&nbsp;Carol&nbsp;Ruth&nbsp;Silver&nbsp;will be at the University of Chicago Bookstore signing copies of her book&nbsp;<em>Freedom Rider Diary: Smuggled Notes from Parchman Prison.</em><br />&nbsp;<br />Post graduation, UChicago law student,&nbsp;Carol&nbsp;Ruth&nbsp;Silver&nbsp;fought for her beliefs on thefrontlines of the civil rights movement by joining the Mississippi Freedom Riders. During the summer of 1961 she and fellow activists&nbsp;rode interstate buses into the segregated South to challenge U.S. Supreme Court rulings outlawing segregation in interstate bus and terminal facilities.&nbsp;Though peaceful in their protests, Freedom Riders faced brutal responses from local mobs and police forces including mob attacks, interventions, and arrests. At the age of 22,&nbsp;Carol&nbsp;Ruth&nbsp;Silver&nbsp;was among the targeted riders, imprisoned for forty days in Mississippi jails including Parchman Prison Farm’s infamous Maximum Security Unit. Despite constant surveillance&nbsp;Carol&nbsp;managed to document her experiences on scraps of paper, which she hid, smuggled, and later compiled into this eye-opening account.&nbsp;Freedom Rider Diary offers an in-depth view of the history of the Freedom Riders from the previously less accessible female perspective.</p