News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Thanksgiving week hours 2014 http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/11/24/thanksgiving-week-hours-2014-2/ Hours for the D&#8217;Angelo Law Library over the week of Thanksgiving 2014 are as follows: Wednesday, November 26 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Thursday, November 27 All libraries are closed in observance of Thanksgiving. Friday, November 28 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/11/24/thanksgiving-week-hours-2014-2/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Mon, 24 Nov 2014 16:40:20 +0000 D'Angelo Law http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=25711 Lee Fennell: Spread the Wealth, or Spread the Wealthy? http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/lee-fennell-spread-wealth-or-spread-wealthy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Spread the Wealth, or Spread the Wealthy? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Lee Fennell </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> NYU Furman Center </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">November 21, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In their essay, Professors Reardon and Bischoff provocatively suggest society should pay more attention to the residential isolation of the affluent. In this response, I want to raise three questions prompted by this analysis.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In their essay, Professors Reardon and Bischoff provocatively suggest society should pay more attention to the residential isolation of the affluent. They posit that hypersegregation at the high end of the income scale allows the wealthiest families in metropolitan areas to hoard resources and power for themselves while cutting out the other 90% of the population. Their analysis also suggests that residential isolation itself, and the lack of incidental social contact it implies, works against any willingness of the well-off to share their bounty.&nbsp;If rich families were physically dispersed throughout the metropolitan area so that they shared neighborhoods, services, and amenities with other families, the argument runs, the affluent would have both a literal and empathic stake in the lot of the middle- and lower-income classes.</p> <p>In this response, I want to raise three questions prompted by this analysis.&nbsp;First, is greater residential dispersion of the most affluent necessary to counter the effects Reardon and Bischoff identify?&nbsp;Second, is it sufficient to address those effects?&nbsp;And third, is it feasible?</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://furmancenter.org/research/iri/fennell">http://furmancenter.org/research/iri/fennell</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/fennell">Lee Fennell</a> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 21 Nov 2014 20:14:43 +0000 willcanderson 24377 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Randolph Stone on the System for Posting Bond http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/randolph-stone-system-posting-bond <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Justice on Trial in Cook County </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> WYCC PBS </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">November 20, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Justice on Trial in Cook County</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Randolph N. Stone, Clinical Professor of Law and director of the Criminal &amp; Juvenile Justice Project Clinic, appeared on WYCC's In the Loop last night to discuss the problems with Cook County's system for posting bond.</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9u-CF2-7fs8?showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-r">Randolph N. Stone</a> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 21 Nov 2014 20:10:02 +0000 willcanderson 24376 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Stone, Posner, Strauss: Are the President's Actions on Immigration Legal? http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/stone-posner-strauss-are-presidents-actions-immigration-legal <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Are the President&#039;s Actions on Immigration Legal? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Geoffrey R. Stone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Huffington Post </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">November 21, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A group of legal and constitutional scholars, from such institutions as Harvard, Yale, Chicago, and Columbia, have looked into this question.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Questions have been raised about the legality of the executive actions recently taken by President Obama in the domain of immigration policy. A group of legal and constitutional scholars, from such institutions as Harvard, Yale, Chicago, and Columbia, have looked into this question. Without expressing any view on the merits of these executive actions as a matter of immigration policy, we are confident that they raise no credible legal or constitutional issue. Our statement to that effect is below:</em></p> <p>We are law professors and lawyers who teach, study, and practice constitutional law and related subjects. We have reviewed the executive actions taken by the President on November 20, 2014, to establish priorities for removing undocumented noncitizens from the United States and to make deferred action available to certain noncitizens. While we differ among ourselves on many issues relating to presidential power and immigration policy, we are all of the view that these actions are lawful. They are exercises of prosecutorial discretion that are consistent with governing law and with the policies that Congress has expressed in the statutes that it has enacted.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/are-the-presidents-action_b_6198972.html">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/geoffrey-r-stone/are-the-presidents-action_b_6198972.html</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stone-g">Geoffrey R. Stone</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/posner-e">Eric Posner</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/strauss">David A. Strauss</a> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 21 Nov 2014 16:10:59 +0000 willcanderson 24372 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Let the Best 'One' Win: Policy Lessons from the New Economics of Platforms http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/e-glen-weyl-let-best-one-win-policy-lessons-new-economics-platforms <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/weyl_glen_6-14.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The primary policy problem in platform markets is usually considered to be excessive lock-in to a potentially inefficient dominant platform. We argue that, once one accounts for sophisticated platform pricing strategies, such concerns are overblown.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> E. Glen Weyl </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-nonfacauth"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> with:&nbsp;</div> Alexander White </div> </div> </div> <p><span>The primary policy problem in platform markets is usually considered to be excessive lock-in to a potentially inefficient dominant platform. We argue that, once one accounts for sophisticated platform pricing strategies, such concerns are overblown. Instead the greater market failure is excessive fragmentation and insufficient participation. These problems, in turn, call for a very different policy response: aiding winners in taking all, ensuring they and not their copycats profit from success, subsidizing adoption and regulating the resulting "One" dominant firm.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 22:23:23 +0000 willcanderson 24368 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu The Paradoxes of Public Philosophy http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/brian-leiter-paradoxes-public-philosophy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/LeiterBrian.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>&nbsp;</span><span></span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Brian Leiter </div> </div> </div> <p><span>The idea of “public philosophy” — that is, philosophy as contributing to questions of moral and political urgency in the community in which it is located — is paradoxical for two reasons. The first is that normative philosophy has no well-established substantive conclusions about the right and the good. Thus, philosophers enter into moral and political debate purporting to offer some kind of expertise, but the expertise they offer can not consist in any credible claim to know what is good, right, valuable, or any other substantive normative proposition that might be decisive in practical affairs. But philosophers — at least those in the broadly Socratic traditions — do bring to debate a method or way of thinking about contested normative questions: they are good at parsing arguments, clarifying the concepts at play in a debate, teasing out the dialectical entailments of suppositions and claims, and so on: Socratic philosophers are, in short, purveyors of what I call “discursive hygiene.” This brings us to the second paradox: although philosophers can contribute no substantive knowledge about the good and the right, they can contribute discursive hygiene. But discursive hygiene plays almost no role in public life, and an only erratic, and highly contingent, role in how people form beliefs about matters of moral and political urgency. I call attention to the role of two factors in moral judgment: non-rational emotional responses and “Tribalism,” the tendency to favor members of one “tribe” at the expense of others. The prevalence of emotional responses, especially tribalist ones, undermines the efficacy of discursive hygiene in public life.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>I conclude that the role for public philosophy is quite circumscribed, though public philosophers should learn from their cousins, the lawyers, who appreciate the role that rhetoric, beyond discursive hygiene, plays in changing moral attitudes and affecting action. Along the way, I discuss Stevenson’s emotivism, what we can learn from Peter Singer’s schizophrenic role as a public philosopher (lauded for his defense of animal rights, pilloried for his defense of killing defective humans), evolutionary explanations of tribalism, the lessons of American Legal Realism for the possible relevance of discursive hygiene, and Marx and Nietzsche as "public" philosophers.</span></p> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 22:01:24 +0000 willcanderson 24362 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu NY Times Features FCJC Case in Drug Sting Story http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/ny-times-features-fcjc-case-drug-sting-story <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Lured to Stings by Fake Drugs and Facing Jail Time That&#039;s All Too Real </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Erik Eckholm </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The New York Times </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">November 20, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The work of the&nbsp;Federal Criminal Justice Clinic was highlighted in the Times's coverage of sting operations using fake drugs.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In a separate line of attack on the drug stings, defendants in Chicago and elsewhere have filed motions to require the bureau to provide data on the racial makeup of sting targets, and information on how the agency selects its targets.</p> <p>In one case, the agency asked the court to dismiss charges rather than be required to comply. In several others, after <a title="AP news account of one such ruling." href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/01/racial-profiling-in-drug-stings_n_3690551.html">judges found at least suggestive evidence of racial targeting</a> and approved the data request, the agency has complied, though the information remains under seal.</p> <p>The goal, defense lawyers say, is to build a case that the bureau engages in racial profiling and selective prosecution, which could result in the dismissal of charges.</p> <p>Defense lawyers in the Chicago cases calculated that the 25 known stash-house stings in that judicial district since 2006 involved 75 black, 16 Latino and six white defendants. The 13 cases since 2010 involved 45 black defendants, 14 Latinos and one white person.</p> <p>An unofficial national <a title="USA Today investigation." href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/07/20/atf-stash-house-stings-racial-profiling/12800195/">review of court files by USA Today</a>, published in July, found that nine in 10 of those imprisoned through such stings were black or Hispanic, well above the share of minorities convicted on charges of other federal robbery, gun and drug offenses.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/21/us/lured-to-stings-by-fake-drugs-and-facing-jail-time-thats-all-too-real.html">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/21/us/lured-to-stings-by-fake-drugs-and-facing-jail-time-thats-all-too-real.html</a></p> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 21:30:09 +0000 willcanderson 24361 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Start your international law research with the World Treaty Library via HeinOnline! http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/11/20/start-your-international-law-research-with-the-world-treaty-library-via-heinonline/ Are you researching an international law topic for your substantial research paper?  For a journal comment or article?  For a clinic or center research project?  For your B.A. paper?  Make sure you look for a related treaty or international agreement &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/11/20/start-your-international-law-research-with-the-world-treaty-library-via-heinonline/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 20:07:58 +0000 Lyonette Louis-Jacques http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=25693 International Human Rights Clinic -- Significant Achievements http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/theadvocate/international-human-rights-clinic-significant-achievements <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">November 20, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>The International Human Rights Clinic started in January 2013. The Clinic works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the United States. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms as well as other substantive law and strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors.&nbsp; The Clinic works closely with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, drafting reports, and training manuals.</p> <p>Clinic students researched and drafted a report titled “Replacing Myths with Facts: Sex-Selective Abortion Laws in the United States,” in partnership with the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF) and Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSRH). As part of the research, clinic student Jeff Gilson travelled to India with Clinic Fellow Brian Citro to better understand the issues surrounding declining sex ratios and the practice of sex selection in the country. The report examines the recent proliferation of laws banning sex-selection abortion in the United States. It is the work of a multidisciplinary team, including two economists and a reproductive health specialist. As the report explains, laws banning sex-selective abortion have been introduced and enacted based upon a combination of implicit bias, factual inaccuracies and harmful stereotypes about Asian Americans. Rather than to combat gender discrimination, the report shows that sex-selective abortion bans are intended to limit access to abortion generally. The report will be submitted in legislative debates at the federal and state level and will be shared directly with legislators around the country. Clinic student Bill Watson presented findings from the report at stakeholder briefing sessions in Washington, D.C. and New York City and participated by video in a session held in San Francisco. Bill Watson also wrote a series of blog posts examining important issues in the report to be published online. Clinic student Kelsey Stricker participated in a lunch-time panel discussion at the Law School, presenting the findings of the report along with representatives from NAPAWF and ANSRH.</p> <p>Clinic students, in partnership with Nazdeek, a legal capacity building organization based in India, conducted comparative research on housing rights and policy in New Delhi, India, with a view toward identifying and addressing the major problems and challenges faced by slum-dwellers and homeless people in the city. Students interviewed prominent scholars and activists, reviewed legal and socio-economic literature, and wrote four memos comparing housing policies in the UK, South Africa, Brazil and Chicago. Students also spent two weeks in Delhi meeting with government officials, including judges and heads of land-owning agencies, policy researchers, local activists, urban planners, and human rights lawyers. They also visited several slums and night shelters for homeless people and conducted in-depth interviews with local community leaders and stakeholders.&nbsp; The team successfully presented its research to the Law Commission of India and Justice A.P. Shah, former Chief Justice of the Delhi High Court and current Chairman of the Law Commission.</p> <p>Clinic students travelled to Colombia to conduct interviews with indigenous communities to investigate issues related to their access to education. They met with students, parents and community leaders. The information gathered has been used to draft a petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights claiming violations of the right to education. Students worked in partnership with the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights.</p> <p>Clinic students drafted and submitted an appeal for asylum to the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) on behalf of a woman who was the victim of domestic violence in Guatemala. If sent back to Guatemala, the appellant faces continued violence and the threat of death at the hands of her common law husband. Students travelled to Texas to meet in person with the appellant, who is in federal detention awaiting the outcome of her appeal. If the BIA rules in favor of the appellant, it will be the first time an individual has received asylum based solely on the threat of domestic violence in her country of origin.</p> <p>Clinic students drafted and submitted a Letter of Allegation to the UN Special Rapporteurs on the Right to Health and Torture on behalf of a drug-dependent, HIV-positive citizen of the Russian Federation. The man was arrested and arbitrarily detained by the police for possession of drugs and suffered cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment and violations of his right of health during his detention. Students researched the case and used the facts to construct arguments based on the right to be free from torture in the Convention Against Torture and the right to health in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. The letter was submitted to the Russian government through the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and will be published in OHCHR’s quarterly communications report along with the government’s response.</p> <p>Student volunteers in the clinic conducted research and drafted legal summaries for publication on the Global Health and Human Rights Database under the supervision of attorneys at the Lawyers Collective in New Delhi, India. The Database is a free online collection of law from around the world relating to health and human rights. Developed by Lawyers Collective and the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University, in collaboration with a worldwide network of civil society partners, the database offers an interactive, searchable, and fully indexed website of case law, national constitutions and international instruments.</p> <p>Students working on independent research projects worked with clinic faculty to examine the current state of the law with respect to hate crimes and discrimination against religious institutions in Illinois. The objective was to determine if current levels of legal protection are adequate and, if not, to identify possible legal and policy changes to improve those levels of protection. Students presented their research findings to the Illinois Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights during at a meeting held at the Law School. The Committee decided to fund further research on the issues presented by the students and a Subcommittee on Hate Crimes and Discrimination Against Religious Institutions was created for this purpose. The project is ongoing.</p> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 19:57:01 +0000 cjackson 24360 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Bringing Clarity to Rule of Law http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/bringing-clarity-rule-law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> By Jessica Gonzalez, ‘15 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Law School </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">November 20, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Leading scholars on the rule of law gathered at the Law School earlier this month for the inaugural conference of the World Justice Project Rule of Law Research Consortium, which was designed to bring clarity to an elusive concept.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Leading scholars on the rule of law gathered at the Law School earlier this month for the inaugural conference of the World Justice Project Rule of Law Research Consortium, which was designed to bring clarity to an elusive concept.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>The “rule of law” — despite its association with good governance, democracy, and growth, and its frequent appearance in development programs — is still an imprecise idea, Deputy Dean Tom Ginsburg said in his introductory remarks. Ginsburg, the Leo Spitz Professor of International Law and the Ludwig and Hilde Wolf Research Scholar, organized the conference and is co-chair of the Research Consortium.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>“Never in the history of foreign aid has so much money been spent on such thin conceptual foundations,” he said. “We don’t really know much about what the rule of law is, and we certainly don’t know much about where it comes from or how it’s sustained.”</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Panelists with expertise in law, economics, political science, anthropology, and sociology presented on topics ranging from the theoretical concepts of the rule of law, to empirical measurement, to issues of implementation. All the while, presenters and attendees were encouraged to assess the state of research on the rule of law, and to identify theoretical gaps and areas of further inquiry.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Particularly salient is the ongoing debate on the use of indices to measure the rule of law. In one panel, Alejandro Ponce and Juan Carlos Botero, economists for the World Justice Project, discussed their own work on the World Justice Project Rule of Law Index. Ponce detailed the methodology behind the Index, which after years in preparation released its fourth annual report earlier this year. His presentation also highlighted ways in which the Index, which reflects more than 500 questions asked to some 100,000 citizens and 2,500 experts in 99 countries, has been used by governments around the world.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Not all the panelists were as enthusiastic.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>After pointing out some of the benefits of using indicators, Professor Sally Engle Merry, Silver Professor of Anthropology at New York University, listed some of their costs. In producing a global indicator, she asserted, measurers must go through "processes of categorization, organization of material, and commensuration, all of which inevitably lead to simplification, to&nbsp;homogenizing&nbsp;the object of analysis, to decontextualizing the object of analysis, and to presenting as individual things that may be better understood in holistic terms."</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Assistant Professor Adam Chilton countered that. “These aren’t reasons to be pessimistic about data or to be skeptical about data," he said. "They’re reasons to demand more data.”</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>He further reminded attendees that indices and data can be useful, despite their shortcomings.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>“It’s true that data itself is a generalization of phenomena, but we have to compare it to the alternative,” he said. “The alternative is anecdotal evidence that is biased as well.”</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Chien-Chih Lin, JSD ‘15, attended both days of the conference because he is interested in both rule of law issues and empirical studies.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>“Specifically, being a Taiwanese student who studies constitutional law in the U.S., concepts such as ‘Asian values,’ or ‘rule of law with Chinese characteristics’ are very puzzling. Therefore, determining what rule of law is, and how to evaluate the degree of rule of law or constitutionalism in different contexts, become important issues to me.”</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>He also reflected on the work left to be