News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Peter Altabef, '83, Named President and CEO of Unisys Corporation http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/peter-altabef-83-named-president-and-ceo-unisys-corporation <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>Unisys Corporation (NYSE: UIS) announced today that it has named Peter A. Altabef as President and Chief Executive Officer, effective January 1, 2015.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.unisys.com/news/News%20Release/Unisys-Corporation-Names-Peter-Altabef-as-Its-New-President-and-CEO">http://www.unisys.com/news/News%20Release/Unisys-Corporation-Names-Peter-Altabef-as-Its-New-President-and-CEO</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Unisys Corporation (NYSE: UIS) announced today that it has named Peter A. Altabef as President and Chief Executive Officer, effective January 1, 2015. At that time, Altabef, 55, also will join the Company's board of directors.&nbsp;Altabef comes to Unisys with more than 20 years of senior leadership experience in the IT industry and has a proven ability to drive revenue growth and achieve strong financial performance.</p> <p>Altabef served as President and CEO of Perot Systems Corporation and MICROS Systems, Inc., and led both to double-digit revenue growth and increased profits. He also served as President of Dell Services, the business and IT services unit of Dell Inc.</p> Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:59:51 +0000 willcanderson 24666 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu James Gardner, '84, Named Interim Dean of the University at Buffalo Law School http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/james-gardner-84-named-interim-dean-university-buffalo-law-school <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>SUNY Distinguished Professor James A. Gardner has been named interim dean of the University at Buffalo Law School.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/12/030.html">http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/12/030.html</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>SUNY Distinguished Professor James A. Gardner has been named interim dean of the University at Buffalo Law School, UB Provost Charles F. Zukoski announced today.</p> <p>Gardner is the Bridget and Thomas Black Professor in the UB Law School, a designation he will retain while serving as interim dean. His appointment is effective Dec. 20.</p> <p>[...]</p> <p><span>A member of the UB faculty member since 2001, Gardner is a highly regarded specialist in constitutional and election law. He is a prolific scholar who has published six books, as well as numerous book chapters, articles and review essays. Gardner recently was recognized as one of the 10 most frequently cited scholars in the field of election law by the influential Election Law blog.</span></p> Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:00:15 +0000 willcanderson 24660 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Zarfes, Kramer & Birnbaum on Teaching Transactional Law to New Lawyers http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/zarfes-kramer-birnbaum-teaching-transactional-law-new-lawyers <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Teaching Transactional Law to New Lawyers </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer and David Birnbaum </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Corporate Counsel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">December 16, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This article describes the problematic absence of transactional legal education, and suggests that the University of Chicago Law School Corporate Lab and complementary experiential courses (with which the three of us are associated) are helping to fill the educational void.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As anyone who has considered a legal education has heard, law school aims to teach each student to “think like a lawyer.” More accurately, though, law school teaches its students to think like litigators by teaching the curriculum that law professors, trained by the traditional case method, know best: parsing the holdings of cases, closely reading statutes, performing efficient legal research, spotting issues, arguing about policy and writing clearly to support a position. In short, newly minted J.D.s are fit to thrive as appellate litigators. This article describes the problematic absence of transactional legal education, and suggests that the University of Chicago Law School Corporate Lab and complementary experiential courses (with which the three of us are associated) are helping to fill the educational void. This model is particularly timely in light of recent curricular reforms by the American Bar Association and the state of California, described below, which increase the number of experiential education credit hours required to graduate.</p> <p>The current educational approach fails to properly educate the many law school graduates—especially from the top schools—who do not go on to practice litigation. In fact, many—if not most—of the attorneys at the largest firms practice in transactional groups. Law school simply does not prepare these students for the tasks that they will encounter early on in their careers as corporate attorneys: evaluating business and legal risk in connection with transactions,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.corpcounsel.com/id=1202679072646/">drafting contracts</a>, negotiating terms in complex agreements and understanding the greater commercial context in which transactions take place. These are not skills that can be taught through the traditional Socratic Method used in schools today; rather, it is only by “doing”—participating in mock negotiations, drafting actual contracts and reviewing documents—that a young lawyer can start to understand business transactions.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.corpcounsel.com/top-stories/id=1202681193378/Teaching-Transactional-Law-to-New-Lawyers">http://www.corpcounsel.com/top-stories/id=1202681193378/Teaching-Transactional-Law-to-New-Lawyers</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/zarfes">David Zarfes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/kramer">Sean Z. Kramer</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 17 Dec 2014 15:01:48 +0000 willcanderson 24657 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Fall quarter loans to quarterly borrowers automatically extended to April 3 http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/12/16/fall-quarter-loans-to-quarterly-borrowers-automatically-extended-to-april-3/ Items checked out by current quarterly borrowers with privileges in good standing and due January 9 will be automatically renewed by the Library for winter quarter. As of December 18, all such items will have a new due date of April &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/12/16/fall-quarter-loans-to-quarterly-borrowers-automatically-extended-to-april-3/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Tue, 16 Dec 2014 19:37:07 +0000 The University of Chicago Library http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=25826 Jennifer Nou's "Sub-Regulating Elections" is "Innovative and Illuminating" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/jennifer-nous-sub-regulating-elections-innovative-and-illuminating <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Breaking the Deadlock in Bipartisan Election Administration </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bertrall Ross </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jotwell </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">December 16, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>In her innovative and illuminating article,&nbsp;</span><em>Sub-Regulating Elections</em><span>, Professor Jennifer Nou engages this problem of deadlock in election administration, and suggests a broad, creative solution.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>What should courts do when bipartisan agencies deadlock on an interpretation of a statute? That conundrum recently arose when the Election Administration Commission (EAC) addressed the meaning of the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA). Specifically, the EAC had to decide whether an Arizona requirement that voter registrants provide proof of their citizenship violated the NVRA, as a refusal to “accept and use” the federal mail-in registration form. The two Democrats on the four-person Commission found that the proof-of-citizenship requirement constituted a refusal to use the federal form while the two Republicans found that it did not. When the federal Court of Appeals reviewed the agency action, the judges seemed to have three options: Defer to the interpretation of the Democratic commissioners; defer to the interpretation of the Republican commissioners; or defer to neither and independently construe the statute. In this context of deadlock, there was no clear justification for deferring to either interpretation. Choosing to defer to one partisan interpretation over the other might subject the court to a&nbsp;<em>Bush v. Gore</em>-like charge of bias. But the decision to independently construe the statute would have had costs as well. It would have denied the court expert guidance in its determination of the meaning of the statute. None of the three options were particularly appealing.</p> <p>In her innovative and illuminating article,&nbsp;<em>Sub-Regulating Elections</em>, Professor Jennifer Nou engages this problem of deadlock in election administration, and suggests a broad, creative solution. The two principal election agencies, the EAC and the Federal Election Commission (FEC), have similar designs in that they both have even numbered commissioners (four for the EAC and six for the FEC) with the two major political parties equally represented. In the current context of political polarization where decisions about the meaning of election statutes often have high stakes, the problem of deadlock has become endemic to election administration. One response would be to change the design of these commissions by making them odd-numbered or eliminating the requirement of partisan balance. But as Nou correctly notes, these design changes are unlikely anytime in the near future.</p> <p>Nou instead proposes a novel solution to the problem of deadlock.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://lex.jotwell.com/breaking-the-deadlock-in-bipartisan-election-administration/">http://lex.jotwell.com/breaking-the-deadlock-in-bipartisan-election-administration/</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/nou">Jennifer Nou</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 16 Dec 2014 16:59:16 +0000 willcanderson 24632 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu New Season of ‘Research Matters’ Highlights Faculty Scholarship http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/new-season-%E2%80%98research-matters%E2%80%99-highlights-faculty-scholarship <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">December 16, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>This fall, the Law School’s online </span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research?order=nid&amp;sort=desc"><span>Research Matters series</span></a><span> highlighted a new round of work from the Law School’s prolific faculty, offering fresh insights on a variety of topics in a Q&amp;A format designed to be informal, conversational, and accessible. The series, which launched in April 2013, has included 32 installments featuring 29 professors. </span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span> </span></p> <p><span>Ever wonder what makes certain constitutional rights more effective? Or how opposition to the 1964 Civil Rights Act can help us better understand reactions to high-profile U.S. Supreme Court cases today? Want to know more about why the artificial redistribution of tax revenue is of growing concern, or what liberal ambivalence toward civil liberties during the New Deal period can tell us about today’s First Amendment debates?</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><span>This fall, the Law School’s online </span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research?order=nid&amp;sort=desc"><span>Research Matters series</span></a><span> highlighted a new round of work from the Law School’s prolific faculty, offering fresh insights on a variety of topics in a Q&amp;A format designed to be informal, conversational, and accessible. The series, which launched in April 2013, has included 32 installments featuring 29 professors. </span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><span>The series was the brainchild of Professor Randy Picker, who once noted: “Faculty research is important in the way that it creates and shapes ideas and then shows up in the classroom. And the point of Research Matters is to try to make that process clear to all.”</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><span>So far this academic year, Research Matters has highlighted:</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ul> <li><span><strong>Professor Nicholas Stephanopoulos’ paper</strong> “</span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/24320"><span>Partisan Gerrymandering and the Efficiency Gap</span></a><span>,” which introduces a new method for measuring the fairness of partisan district lines. Stephanopoulos and his co-author found that in the past 40 years, gerrymandering has gotten worse — and it has largely favored Republicans. <strong>Why this matters:</strong> “It affects the policies coming out of legislatures,” Stephanopoulos said. “At the federal level, if there had been an efficiency gap of zero in every state in 2012, Democrats would have controlled the U.S. House. The last two years would have been completely different with a Democratic Congress. Immigration reform would have passed, a climate-change action might have been taken. Gerrymandering is not just about seats and votes; if you affect who gets elected, you affect which policies come out.”</span></li> <li><span><strong>Professor Dhammika Dharmapala’s paper </strong></span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/dhammika-dharmapala-base-erosion-and-profit-shifting-simple-conceptual-framework"><span>“Base Erosion and Profit Shifting: A Simple Conceptual Framework</span></a><span>,” which helps explain an international taxation issue that is of rising concern in the increasingly global economy. The piece is designed to give non-tax experts background on base erosion and profit shifting, a tax-planning practice in which multinational firms exploit inconsistencies in the tax laws of different countries to reduce their tax burden. <strong>Why this matters:</strong> “This is probably the most important current policy initiative within the international tax arena,” Dharmapala said. “If (reform efforts) are at all successful, it will result in new legislation and new sets of rules in various countries, and it is better that those changes in policy take place in an environment with more information.”</span></li> <li><span><strong>Assistant Professor Laura Weinrib’s </strong>paper, “</span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/24461"><span>Civil Liberties Outside the Courts</span></a><span>,” which examines surprising shifts in how conservatives and liberals viewed civil liberties during the New Deal period. In it, she explores a less-often-told side of history: the ambivalence of liberal New Dealers toward civil liberties and conservatives’ reluctant embrace of the project. <strong>Why it matters:</strong> “I think that debates over the First Amendment have been unduly constrained by this idea that a strong, anti-state, judicially enforceable First Amendment has always been central to concepts of American constitutional democracy,” Weinrib said. “I hope that recovering the frenzied debate of the 1930s about the costs of a strong First Amendment will open space to debate alternative visions today.”</span></li> <li><span><strong>Professor Justin Driver’s paper</strong>, “</span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/23772"><span>Reactionary Rhetoric and Liberal Legal Academia</span></a><span>,” which explores opposition to the 1964 Civil Rights Act as a way of better understanding the reactions of today’s left-leaning law professors to high-profile U.S. Supreme Court decisions. <strong>Why it matters:</strong> “Examining history can sometimes shed light on our own times,” Driver said. “I hope this piece will help people to better understand opposition to today’s civil rights ventures and also to contemplate how that opposition seems likely to be remembered. I also wanted to warn judges about the dangers of internalizing reactionary rhetoric.”</span></li> <li><span><strong>Assistant Professor Adam Chilton’s paper</strong>, “</span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/23964"><span>Do Constitutional Rights Make a Difference</span></a><span>?” This work examined whether a right is better protected in practice if it is included in a country’s constitution. He and his co-author found the more a right has to do with collective organizing — for example, the rights to form political parties and to unionize — the more likely it is to be effective. <strong>Why this matters:</strong> “Constitutions are constantly being rewritten. We see it happening with countries in the Middle East right now. Constitution-makers in these places are trying to figure out what to include and what not to include,” Chilton said. “If you want a constitution that ensures freedoms going forward, our results suggest that the best way to do that is to explicitly provide for the protections through groups independent of the government.”</span></li> </ul> <p><span> </span><span> </span><span> </span><span> </span><span> </span></p> <p><span>A new Research Matters Q&amp;A is posted every Wednesday. The </span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research?order=nid&amp;sort=desc"><span>entire series</span></a><span> can be found on the website, along with </span><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research?order=nid&amp;sort=desc"><span>links to current faculty scholarship</span></a><span>.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/dharmapala">Dhammika Dharmapala</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/driver">Justin Driver</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/stephanopoulos">Nicholas Stephanopoulos</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/chilton">Adam Chilton</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/weinrib">Laura Weinrib</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/picker">Randal C. Picker</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/nick_stephanopoulos.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=7204904">nick_stephanopoulos.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 16 Dec 2014 15:08:47 +0000 beckygillespie 24569 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu William Baude on Originalism and the Positive Turn http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/william-baude-originalism-and-positive-turn <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Originalism and the Positive Turn </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> William Baude </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Library of Law and Liberty </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">December 12, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>For more than a decade, the “New Originalism” has been identified with a focus on the Constitution’s original meaning (not its original intent) and with the admission that original meaning won’t perfectly constrain judges.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For more than a decade, the “New Originalism” has been identified with a focus on the Constitution’s original meaning (not its original intent) and with the admission that original meaning won’t perfectly constrain judges. Steven Smith challenges that version of originalism. The challenge should be rejected, but in the course of rejecting it we may better understand a new development in the new originalism: the positive turn, or thinking of originalism as&nbsp;<em>our law</em>.</p> <p>The new originalism has long faced two different kinds of critics: the external and the internal. The external critics are not originalists at all. Some of them simply reject all forms of originalism, but many instead argue that the new originalism is inferior to the old one. The old originalism, they say, at least had the courage of its convictions. “At least we were arguing about something!” these critics might cry. “Now, I don’t know what the debate is about anymore!”</p> <p>Originalists themselves often mistrust these external critics. After all, those who are unsympathetic to a philosophy often have bad judgment about what are the best parts of that philosophy. Other external critics may not have kept with originalism’s development.</p> <p>New originalism also has internal critics. The internal critic continues to adhere to, or at least sympathize with, the “old” originalism. This critic’s worry is that an originalism that yearns to be too flexible or too popular may lose whatever it was that made originalism good in the first place.</p> <p>In recent years, Steven Smith has become the most important internal critic, as his Liberty Law Forum&nbsp;<a href="http://www.libertylawsite.org/liberty-forum/meanings-or-decisions-getting-originalism-back-on-track/">essay</a>&nbsp;continues to show. Smith argues that it is time for originalists to do away with “original meaning.” Meaning is too manipulable, he says, too easily detached from the actual goals of the original enactors. We should instead look for what he calls the “original decision.”</p> <p>I disagree, for reasons that are simultaneously narrow and deep.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.libertylawsite.org/liberty-forum/originalism-and-the-positive-turn/">http://www.libertylawsite.org/liberty-forum/originalism-and-the-positive-turn/</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/baude">William Baude</a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 15 Dec 2014 16:41:48 +0000 willcanderson 24613 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu William Tong, '00, Appointed Cochairman of Connecticut General Assembly's Judiciary Committee http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/william-tong-00-appointed-cochairman-connecticut-general-assemblys-j <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>After humble beginnings, William Tong's life has been a series of accomplishments.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.ctlawtribune.com/top-stories/id=1202678910894/New-Judiciary-Committee-Chairman-Has-Background-in-Restaurants-Commercial-Litigation?mcode=1202615402746&amp;curindex=0&amp;slreturn=20141115102323">http://www.ctlawtribune.com/top-stories/id=1202678910894/New-Judiciary-Committee-Chairman-Has-Background-in-Restaurants-Commercial-Litigation?mcode=1202615402746&amp;curindex=0&amp;slreturn=20141115102323</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>After humble beginnings, William Tong's life has been a series of accomplishments.</p> <p>A law degree from the University of Chicago. A position as commercial litigator at Finn Dixon &amp; Herling in Stamford. Election to the state House of Representatives in 2006. And now an appointment to serve as cochairman of the General Assembly's Judiciary Committee, a post that puts him in a position to shape criminal and civil law in Connecticut and help influence how attorneys, judges and the court system operate.</p> <p>He traces his decision to become a lawyer and a public official to one source: his parents. They immigrated to the U.S. in the ear