News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project -- Significant Achievements http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/theadvocate/civil-rights-and-police-accountability-project-significant-achievements-0 <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 24, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>•&nbsp;The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic won a landmark decision in the Illinois Appellate Court that established that records related to police misconduct belong to the public.&nbsp; This historic decision under the Freedom of Information Act will dramatically improve transparency and police accountability throughout Illinois and serve as a model for other states around the nation.&nbsp;</p> <p>Graduating students <strong>Italia Patti </strong>and <strong>Saul Cohen </strong>argued the case in the Court of Appeals.&nbsp; Experienced appellate counsel observed that their arguments and knowledge of the law exceeded those of top-flight appellate litigators.&nbsp;</p> <p>This case, brought on behalf of journalist Jamie Kalven in late 2009, evolved from the Clinic’s work uncovering a pattern of police abuse in Chicago public housing.&nbsp; After years of documenting a pattern of police abuse in Chicago public housing, the Clinic obtained and analyzed the Police Department’s internal police misconduct investigations and data concerning the officers who accumulated the most abuse complaints in the City.&nbsp; The Clinic found that a tiny percentage of the police force was responsible for nearly half of all complaints of police abuse in the City.&nbsp; However, those officers had been allowed to abuse some of the most vulnerable residents in Chicago with impunity.&nbsp; While the Clinic was able to win access to those critical data, it was unable to share the records with the broader public.&nbsp;</p> <p>In its March 2014 decision, the Court of Appeals recognized the public’s right to this information to enable the citizenry to fulfill its role of ensuring that law enforcement is acting in the public interest.&nbsp; More than 10 Clinic students contributed to this victory.&nbsp;</p> <p>A fuller account of the Clinic’s work on this project is available at <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/big-win-police-accountability">http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/big-win-police-accountability</a>.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Based on the Clinic’s appellate victory, the Clinic won a consent decree in July 2014 that opened the Chicago Police Department to the public.&nbsp; Going forward, members of the public will have access to police misconduct complaints, completed investigations, and data about officers charged with repeated abuse.&nbsp; This information had never before been available to members of the public.&nbsp; The policy sea change embodied in the decree creates the context to take on issues of police misconduct that have gone unaddressed for decades, identify patterns of abuse, and build the public trust needed to make the Department more effective in fighting crime, particularly in Chicago’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Clinic intends to develop an informational clearinghouse for researchers, lawyers, journalists, law enforcement, and members of the public to improve police accountability, service, and public safety.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Five Clinic students, <strong>Pedro Gerson</strong>, <strong>Matt Streit</strong>, <strong>Catherine Sullivan</strong>, <strong>Joshua Burday</strong>, and <strong>Ian Todd </strong>won a nearly $2 million dollar jury verdict in federal court in Padilla v. City of Chicago, 06 C 5462.&nbsp; A group of five Chicago police officers from the Department’s elite Special Operations Section engaged in a years-long conspiracy to target vulnerable people for false arrest so that they could break into peoples’ homes and rob them.&nbsp; Pursuant to their conspiracy, they falsely arrested our client, Noel Padilla, who had just become a father for the first time.&nbsp; They then dragged him around the city in handcuffs over the course of the next four hours, as they invaded the homes of his family members, looking for money to steal.&nbsp; When they came up empty handed, they planted drugs on Mr. Padilla; they robbed him of his money that he had saved for a security deposit for an apartment for his young family; and they wrote false reports accusing him of a crime that they knew that he did not commit—a crime that could have landed him in prison for the next 40 years.</p> <p>The false charges were ultimately dismissed 278 days later, when the officers’ criminal conspiracy came to light.&nbsp; However, Mr. Padilla endured those 278 days in the Cook County Jail, believing that he may never hold his son again.</p> <p>The Clinic students proved that the five officers committed each of these terrible acts because they believed that they could do so with impunity.&nbsp; Students presented evidence through one of the nation’s leading mathematicians that the probability was far less than one in a thousand that the five officers or their Special Operations colleagues would face any discipline when charged with falsely arresting, illegally searching, or stealing from people.&nbsp; They demonstrated that the officers stole more than the freedom of our client.&nbsp; They also stole the honor of the thousands of good officers who serve and protect the public.</p> <p>As a result of the officers’ malicious conduct, the jury awarded punitive damages to be paid directly from the officers’ pockets to punish them and deter others from engaging in similar abuse.</p> <p>This case involved six years of outstanding work by more than 20 clinic students, anchored by the five mentioned above.&nbsp; Our clients cried tears of joy and offered their heartfelt gratitude to each and every one who fought for justice with them—even at a time when few could imagine that these officers would prey on innocent people like the Padilla family.</p> <p>Each of the students and former students who contributed to this effort deserves recognition for exposing such an injustice, serving a family in real need, and becoming a part of something greater than themselves.&nbsp;</p> <p>A fuller account of our students’ work is accessible at <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/police-accountability-clinic-wins-jury-verdict-kidnapped-falsely-jailed-man">http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/police-accountability-clinic-wins-jury-verdict-kidnapped-falsely-jailed-man</a>.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Finally, Clinic students <strong>Michelle Mbekeani</strong>, <strong>Mike Morrill</strong>, and <strong>Jackie Scotch-Marmo</strong> capped a successful school year with a group of high school students from Hyde Park High School by producing and showing a short documentary film on youth/police interactions from the perspectives of inner city high school students.&nbsp; Led by clinic alum, <strong>Chaclyn Hunt</strong>, Clinic and high school students screened the documentary and facilitated a conversation with the Illinois Racial Profiling and Data Oversight Board, which includes legislators, representatives from the Governor’s Office, the Illinois State Police, the State Attorney General, and various community groups.&nbsp; The conversation revolved around students’ experiences with stop and frisk practices, the lack of police accountability, and its effects on how students view the police.&nbsp; Members of the Board were so moved by our students’ presentation that they have proposed statewide legislation concerning data collection on stop and frisk, training for law enforcement involving the high school students and our film, and public hearings on the issues raised by the students.</p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:42:50 +0000 cjackson 24000 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project -- Significant Achievements http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/theadvocate/civil-rights-and-police-accountability-project-significant-achievements <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 24, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project</p> <p>•&nbsp;The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic won a landmark decision in the Illinois Appellate Court that established that records related to police misconduct belong to the public.&nbsp; This historic decision under the Freedom of Information Act will dramatically improve transparency and police accountability throughout Illinois and serve as a model for other states around the nation.&nbsp;</p> <p>Graduating students Italia Patti and Saul Cohen argued the case in the Court of Appeals.&nbsp; Experienced appellate counsel observed that their arguments and knowledge of the law exceeded those of top-flight appellate litigators.&nbsp;</p> <p>This case, brought on behalf of journalist Jamie Kalven in late 2009, evolved from the Clinic’s work uncovering a pattern of police abuse in Chicago public housing.&nbsp; After years of documenting a pattern of police abuse in Chicago public housing, the Clinic obtained and analyzed the Police Department’s internal police misconduct investigations and data concerning the officers who accumulated the most abuse complaints in the City.&nbsp; The Clinic found that a tiny percentage of the police force was responsible for nearly half of all complaints of police abuse in the City.&nbsp; However, those officers had been allowed to abuse some of the most vulnerable residents in Chicago with impunity.&nbsp; While the Clinic was able to win access to those critical data, it was unable to share the records with the broader public.&nbsp;</p> <p>In its March 2014 decision, the Court of Appeals recognized the public’s right to this information to enable the citizenry to fulfill its role of ensuring that law enforcement is acting in the public interest.&nbsp; More than 10 Clinic students contributed to this victory.&nbsp;</p> <p>A fuller account of the Clinic’s work on this project is available at <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/big-win-police-accountability">http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/big-win-police-accountability</a>.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Based on the Clinic’s appellate victory, the Clinic won a consent decree in July 2014 that opened the Chicago Police Department to the public.&nbsp; Going forward, members of the public will have access to police misconduct complaints, completed investigations, and data about officers charged with repeated abuse.&nbsp; This information had never before been available to members of the public.&nbsp; The policy sea change embodied in the decree creates the context to take on issues of police misconduct that have gone unaddressed for decades, identify patterns of abuse, and build the public trust needed to make the Department more effective in fighting crime, particularly in Chicago’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Clinic intends to develop an informational clearinghouse for researchers, lawyers, journalists, law enforcement, and members of the public to improve police accountability, service, and public safety.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Five Clinic students, Pedro Gerson, Matt Streit, Catherine Sullivan, Joshua Burday, and Ian Todd won a nearly $2 million dollar jury verdict in federal court in Padilla v. City of Chicago, 06 C 5462.&nbsp; A group of five Chicago police officers from the Department’s elite Special Operations Section engaged in a years-long conspiracy to target vulnerable people for false arrest so that they could break into peoples’ homes and rob them.&nbsp; Pursuant to their conspiracy, they falsely arrested our client, Noel Padilla, who had just become a father for the first time.&nbsp; They then dragged him around the city in handcuffs over the course of the next four hours, as they invaded the homes of his family members, looking for money to steal.&nbsp; When they came up empty handed, they planted drugs on Mr. Padilla; they robbed him of his money that he had saved for a security deposit for an apartment for his young family; and they wrote false reports accusing him of a crime that they knew that he did not commit—a crime that could have landed him in prison for the next 40 years.</p> <p>The false charges were ultimately dismissed 278 days later, when the officers’ criminal conspiracy came to light.&nbsp; However, Mr. Padilla endured those 278 days in the Cook County Jail, believing that he may never hold his son again.</p> <p>The Clinic students proved that the five officers committed each of these terrible acts because they believed that they could do so with impunity.&nbsp; Students presented evidence through one of the nation’s leading mathematicians that the probability was far less than one in a thousand that the five officers or their Special Operations colleagues would face any discipline when charged with falsely arresting, illegally searching, or stealing from people.&nbsp; They demonstrated that the officers stole more than the freedom of our client.&nbsp; They also stole the honor of the thousands of good officers who serve and protect the public.</p> <p>As a result of the officers’ malicious conduct, the jury awarded punitive damages to be paid directly from the officers’ pockets to punish them and deter others from engaging in similar abuse.</p> <p>This case involved six years of outstanding work by more than 20 clinic students, anchored by the five mentioned above.&nbsp; Our clients cried tears of joy and offered their heartfelt gratitude to each and every one who fought for justice with them—even at a time when few could imagine that these officers would prey on innocent people like the Padilla family.</p> <p>Each of the students and former students who contributed to this effort deserves recognition for exposing such an injustice, serving a family in real need, and becoming a part of something greater than themselves.&nbsp;</p> <p>A fuller account of our students’ work is accessible at <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/police-accountability-clinic-wins-jury-verdict-kidnapped-falsely-jailed-man">http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/police-accountability-clinic-wins-jury-verdict-kidnapped-falsely-jailed-man</a>.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Finally, Clinic students Michelle Mbekeani, Mike Morrill, and Jackie Scotch-Marmo capped a successful school year with a group of high school students from Hyde Park High School by producing and showing a short documentary film on youth/police interactions from the perspectives of inner city high school students.&nbsp; Led by clinic alum, Chaclyn Hunt, Clinic and high school students screened the documentary and facilitated a conversation with the Illinois Racial Profiling and Data Oversight Board, which includes legislators, representatives from the Governor’s Office, the Illinois State Police, the State Attorney General, and various community groups.&nbsp; The conversation revolved around students’ experiences with stop and frisk practices, the lack of police accountability, and its effects on how students view the police.&nbsp; Members of the Board were so moved by our students’ presentation that they have proposed statewide legislation concerning data collection on stop and frisk, training for law enforcement involving the high school students and our film, and public hearings on the issues raised by the students.</p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:36:52 +0000 cjackson 23999 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Joshua Decker, '06, Named Executive Director of ACLU Alaska http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/joshua-decker-06-named-executive-director-aclu-alaska <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.acluak.org/pages/execdir.html" title="http://www.acluak.org/pages/execdir.html">http://www.acluak.org/pages/execdir.html</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The American Civil Liberties Union of Alaska is pleased to announce that Joshua Decker is its new executive director. He began his new leadership role on March 6, 2014; he was the interim executive director since May 2013, and was the ACLU of Alaska's staff attorney since November 2011.</p> <p>"We were very fortunate that such an impressive and wide array of dedicated and skilled professionals wanted to work with us," said Donna Goldsmith, President of the ACLU of Alaska Board of Directors. "Joshua's career trajectory demonstrates his deep commitment to, and passion for, civil liberties. His professional and personal dedication to our mission, coupled with his exceptional communication skills, strategic vision, and professional integrity, made him the obvious choice for us. We are privileged to work with someone whose leadership skills and vision are so clear."</p> <p>Before joining the ACLU of Alaska two-and-a-half years ago, Joshua represented rural, low-income, and elderly clients for four years at the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee, and he spent one year as an associate in the New York office of Clifford Chance, the international law firm. He earned his law degree from the University of Chicago Law School, where he was the executive editor of the Chicago Journal of International Law and an avid participant in the civil rights and police accountability clinic, and his bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago, from which he graduated with honors in political science. "I am honored and excited to be the ACLU of Alaska's new executive director," Joshua said. "The Constitution is the active contract by which we, as Americans, have agreed to live our civic lives. Our mission is to safeguard those constitutional rights and I look forward to connecting with our members, reaching out to communities and leaders throughout the state, and building the ACLU team so that we can continue to expand our reach and protect the core of who we are."</p> <p>Joshua follows Jeffrey Mittman, who was the executive director from 2008 to 2013; he is now the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri.</p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 15:48:28 +0000 mferzige 23995 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Carmel Dooling, '17, named Pro Bono Volunteer of the Month http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/carmel-dooling-17-named-pro-bono-volunteer-month-0 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becca Smith, &#039;16 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pro Bono Board </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 24, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>Carmel Dooling,’17, began participating in pro bono work before classes even started—and by mid-October had already contributed 19 hours toward the Pro Bono Pledge. She's been named Volunteer of the Month for November.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Editor's note: The Pro Bono Board, a student group committed to expanding pro bono knowledge and opportunities to students, names a Pro Bono Volunteer of the Month. The November honoree is Carmel Dooling, ‘17. Becca Smith, a member of the board, wrote this story on her work. For more information on pro bono work, visit the </em><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/probono"><em>Pro Bono Service Initiative</em></a><em> website or contact </em><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/students/careerservices/staff#mansuri"><em>Shehnaz Mansuri</em></a><em> in the Office of Career Services</em>.&nbsp;</p> <p>Carmel Dooling,’17, began participating in pro bono work before classes even started—and by mid-October had already contributed 19 hours toward the Pro Bono Pledge. In September, she met with clients at the walk-in Woodlawn Legal Clinic run by the Legal Assistance Foundation and DLA Piper. She also has volunteered with Instituto del Progreso Latino, helping lawful permanent residents fill out documentation in their path to citizenship.&nbsp;<span> </span></p> <p>Carmel said she enjoys being able to give people peace of mind and help them advocate for themselves.&nbsp;</p> <p>“We’re in law school, and we’re confused about the law, so for people with no legal background it’s really confusing,” she said.&nbsp;</p> <p>Carmel decided to get involved in pro bono work because she thinks it’s a great way for students to put their problems in perspective. Immigration is a personal and important subject for Carmel because her grandfather was a migrant farmworker. She also speaks conversational Spanish and thought it would be a great way to keep practicing her language skills.&nbsp;</p> <p>As an undergraduate at Arizona State University, Carmel worked on political campaigns and canvassed Latino neighborhoods.&nbsp; As the president of an organization working with refugees in elementary school, she helped students adjust to living in the United States. Carmel also worked for the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services and Education, providing people with legal information.</p> <p>Carmel doesn’t know what kind of work she wants to pursue after law school, but she likes that pro bono work is something she can do while at a law firm or working in the public interest sector.&nbsp; Besides racking up pro bono hours, Carmel decompresses through downward dogs or enjoying her homemade pavlovas (although probably not at the same time).</p> <p>The Pro Bono Board is excited to present Carmel Dooling as November’s Pro Bono Volunteer of the Month!&nbsp;</p> <p><span> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/2014.10.16_carmel_dooling_picture.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=94032">2014.10.16_carmel_dooling_picture.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 15:02:12 +0000 beckygillespie 23994 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Malani Discusses Lessons from SARS for Ebola on WBEZ http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/malani-discusses-lessons-sars-ebola-wbez <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> New Report Points to Lessons from SARS about Epidemic Panic </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Morning Shift, WBEZ </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 23, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Thursday, October 23, 2014, <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/malani">Anup Malani</a>, Lee and Brena Freeman Professor of Law, appeared on WBEZ's Morning Shift to discuss his paper (with Daniel Bennett and Chun-Fang Chiang) entitled&nbsp;"<a href="http://www.unc.edu/depts/econ/workshops/Bennett_SARS_April2010.pdf">Panic! Social Learning and the Response to SARS in Taiwan</a>," and how the lessons of SARS can apply to the current conversations about Ebola.&nbsp;</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/173495011&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2014-10-23/morning-shift-assessing-value-college-education-110981" title="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2014-10-23/morning-shift-assessing-value-college-education-110981">http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2014-10-23/morning-shift-asse...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/malani">Anup Malani</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 23 Oct 2014 22:46:43 +0000 mferzige 23989 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu International Human Rights Clinic to Appear Before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/international-human-rights-clinic-appear-inter-american-commission-human-rights <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to Hear Testimony on Domestic Violence in U.S. Monday Oct. 27 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 23, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p><span><strong>Human Rights Groups Demand U.S. Govt. Implement Changes to Domestic Violence Policy in Accordance with IACHR 2011 Decision</strong><br />&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong>WASHINGTON</strong> – The American Civil Liberties Union, the <a href="http://ihrclinic.uchicago.edu/">International Human Rights Clinic at University of Chicago Law School</a>, and several other human rights groups&nbsp;will appear before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) Monday, October 27 to seek justice for domestic violence survivor Jessica Lenahan and domestic violence policy reforms in the U.S.</p> <p> In 2011, the Commission decided <em><a href="http://www.law.miami.edu/human-rights-clinic/pdf/2011/USPU12626EN.pdf">Jessica Lenahan (Gonzales) v. United States</a></em>, finding that the government violated the human rights of Ms. Lenahan and her three daughters. The Commission&nbsp;recommended that the government conduct an investigation into its failure to respond to the 1999 domestic violence incident in <a href="http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/04-278.ZS.html">Castle Rock, Colorado</a> that resulted in the deaths of the three girls and the circumstances of their deaths. It also recommended that the government adopt reforms at the federal and state levels to ensure domestic violence protections.</p> <p>The U.S. has made almost no progress in providing justice to Lenahan or implementing systemic reforms since the Commission issued the decision.</p> <p>The organizations appearing before the IACHR are the Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute, the Human Rights Clinics at the University of Chicago Law School and University of Miami School of Law, the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice &amp; Human Rights and the American Civil Liberties Union.</p> <p> <strong>WHAT<br /> </strong>Petitioners will present testimony detailing the United States’ failure to implement changes to domestic violence laws and policies or investigate the failures in Ms. Lenahan's case in the three years since the IACHR decision. The U.S. government will have an opportunity to respond.<strong></strong></p> <p> WHO</p> <ul> <li>Jessica Lenahan, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvPtMCrl4J4&amp;index=4&amp;list=PLwfdTKcPlB5mwDXMIW0U7RM49dP_OvoMx">domestic violence survivor</a></li> <li>Rashida Manjoo, <a href="http://www.ohchr.org/en/Issues/Women/SRWomen/Pages/RashidaManjoo.aspx">United Nations special rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences</a></li> <li>Lenora Lapidus, director of the <a href="https://www.aclu.org/womens-rights"><span>American Civil Liberties Union’s Women’s Rights Project</span></a></li> <li>Carrie Bettinger-Lopez, director of the <a href="https://ihrclinic.uchicago.edu/"><span>International Human Rights Clinic at University of Chicago Law School</span></a> and <a href="www.law.miami.edu/hrc"><span>University of Miami School of Law</span></a><a href="www.law.miami.edu/hrc"><span>&nbsp;Human Rights Clinic&nbsp;</span></a></li> <li>Santiago Canton, executive director of <a href="http://rfkcenter.org/human-rights"><span>RFK Partners for Human Rights</span></a>, <a href="http://rfkcenter.org/human-rights"><span>Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice &amp; Human Rights</span></a></li> <li>Risa Kaufman, executive director of the <span><a href="http://web.law.columbia.edu/human-rights-institute">Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute</a></span></li> </ul> <p><strong>WHEN<br /> </strong>Monday, October 27, 2014 10:15 a.m.EDT</p> <p> <strong>WHERE<br /> </strong>Organization of American States, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights<br /> 1889 F St. N.W., Padilha Vidal Room (TL - Terrace Level), Washington, DC, U.S.A. 20006</p> <p>The testimony will also be available via webcast at:<br /><a href="http://www.oas.org/en/iachr/media_center/coverage.asp"><span>http://www.oas.org/en/iachr/media_center/coverage.asp</span></a></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p>The website of our partner clinic, the <a href="www.law.miami.edu/human-rights-clinic/hrc-gonzalez-usa.php?op=6">University of Miami School of Law Human Rights, Clinic</a>)</p> <p>The complete schedule of the Inter-American Commission's hearings next week can be found here:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.oas.org/en/iachr/sessions/docs/Calendario-153-audiencias-en.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.oas.org/en/iachr/sessions/docs/Calendario-153-audiencias-en.pdf</a></p> <p>Media contact: Caroline Bettinger-Lopez, (<span>305) 281-9856</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/node/22515">Caroline Bettinger-López</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-files"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-application-pdf" alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/calendario-153-audiencias-en.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=263016" title="calendario-153-audiencias-en.pdf">Hearing Schedule</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 23 Oct 2014 16:54:01 +0000 arzepecki 23985 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Public Interest Fellowship Frees Students to Choose Career Path http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/magazine/fall14/publicinterestfellowship <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Barbara J. Fried (née Vogelfanger), ’57, AB’54, has created the Mark and Barbara Fried Fund for Public Interest in the Law School.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Barbara J. Fried (née Vogelfanger), ’57, AB’54, has created the Mark and Barbara Fried Fund for Public Interest in the Law School. Her gift endows a one-year public interest fellowship for a Law School graduate and provides support for a second such fellowship. It is part of a larger gift to the University from Mrs. Fried, through which the College also receives funding that will be used to support internships, programming, and staffing to promote public interest careers.</p> <p>Mrs. Fried’s husband, Mark Fried, ’56, passed away in 2010. They met while he was a student at the Law School and she was an undergraduate in the College, and they married shortly after she graduated. They practiced law together for twenty years before they created the Virginia-based real estate business Fried Companies.</p> <p>One reason for her gift, Mrs. Fried says, is that career decisions today are not what they once were: “In my day, things were pretty much mapped out and you followed the prescribed plan, but today’s young people are much more flexible in their decisions about life and work, and perhaps more determined to find meaning, direction, and purpose as quickly as possible. Debt can interfere with freely choosing a path, so these fellowships let Law School graduates try out public interest work, to see whether they find a real vocation there. I’m confident that many will, and our society will be better for it.”</p> <p>Together, Mr. and Mrs. Fried served the public interest in many ways. They cofounded Innisfree Village, a residential community for developmentally disabled adults; created a therapeutic horseback riding program for children and adults with physical and mental disabilities; organized a coalition of Virginia dentists to serve uninsured patients; and helped start a scholarship program for foster children who attend community college. They served under both Democratic &nbsp;and Republican governors to make housing more affordable for all Virginians and held leadership positions in dozens of local charitable organizations throughout the state.</p> <p>Mrs. Fried currently chairs the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, serves on the Board of Visitors at the University of Virginia, is emeritus chair of the Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership at the University of Virginia, and is an emeritus trustee of the George Mason University Foundation. Mr. Fried served as a director or trustee or organizations that included the George Mason University Foundation and the Virginia Community College Foundation.</p> <p>“Barbara and Mark Fried epitomize what is great about the University of Chicago Law School,” says Dean Michael Schill. “They took their educations and became great entrepreneurs and philanthropists. Barbara’s dedication to the world of public affairs is inspiring. I am so pleased that she has taken a leadership role in supporting our efforts to train lawyers who will take on some of the world’s greatest problems and challenges.”</p> <p>Both Mr. and Mrs. Fried served on the Law School’s Visiting Committee. In 2007, they endowed the Mark and Barbara Fried Professorship at the Law School, which has been held by Emily Buss since its inception. At the time that gift was made, Mr. Fried said, “We wanted to support the work of a faculty member dealing with important social issues, and Professor Buss fits that description.”</p> <p>“The Law School—and for me, the College, too—opened many opportunities for Mark and me, and enriched the quality of our lives in so many ways,” Mrs. Fried says. “We have been happy to give back; it would be ungrateful not to. Now that our five grandchildren are in various stages of their own educations, I only hope that they will be as fortunate as Mark and I were. And if they are also lucky enough, as we were, to meet the person they want to spend their lives with, that will be a wonderful bonus.”</p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/barbarafried.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=13461">barbarafried.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-thumbnail"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/thumbnail/barbarafried-thumb.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=3802">barbarafried-thumb.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:54:36 +0000 willcanderson 23977 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Research Matters: Adam Chilton on "Do Constitutional Rights Make a Difference?" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/23964 <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facresearch-abstract"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/faculty/research/adam-chilton-do-constitutional-rights-make-difference">Do Constitutional Rights Make a Difference?</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-researchmatters-faculty"> <div class="field-label">Faculty member:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/faculty/chilton">Adam Chilton</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/chilton-adam-web.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=10936">chilton-adam-web.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research?order=nid&amp;sort=desc"><em>Research Matters</em></a><em> is a biweekly feature in which a member of the faculty talks about some of his or her latest work and its impact and relevance to law and society.</em></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Assistant Professor <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/chilton">Adam Chilton</a> wrote “<a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/adam-chilton-do-constitutional-rights-make-difference">Do Constitutional Rights Make a Difference</a>?” with <a href="http://www.law.virginia.edu/lawweb/faculty.nsf/FHPbI/2301734">Mila Versteeg</a>, an associate professor at the University of Virginia School of Law. The August 2014 paper, part of a <a href="http://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/law_and_economics_wp/">series</a> at the Law School’s <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/coase-sandor">Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics</a>, examined whether a right is better protected in practice if it is included in a country’s constitution. They focused on six political rights: to establish political parties; to strike and/or unionize; to associate and assemble; to religious freedom; to free press/expression; and to free movement.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. How did this paper originate?<br /></strong>A. Last year Mila Versteeg was visiting the law school for the fall quarter, and we had a series of conversations about whether we could find a way to empirically test whether the inclusion of a right in a constitution made a country more likely to protect that right later on. Eventually we decided we could use a method that had been developed to empirically test human rights treaties.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Which rights are most effective, and why?<br /></strong>A. We find that the more a right has to do with collective organizing, the more likely it is to be effective. The rights that are most fundamentally collective—to form political parties and to unionize—are consistently associated with better rights protection in practice. This suggests that organizations, such as political parties or trade unions, are able to help protect the rights and make sure they aren’t cracked down on or eliminated. &nbsp;In other words, because these rights establish organizations that can protect the right, these rights have a certain self-enforcing quality.&nbsp; The rights that are least collective—the rights to freedom of movement and freedom of expression—have no consistent relationship with protection. For example, North Korea, in its constitution, has an article that looks very similar to our First Amendment. It says that the country protects the right to freedom of speech and expression. Obviously, they don’t really mean it. A country might include a right to freedom of expression in its constitution, but this might just be cheap talk. Our results suggest that countries are a little more careful about saying there’s a right to political parties and a right to unionize.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Why is this an important issue to study?<br /></strong>A. Constitutions are constantly being rewritten. We see it happening with countries in the Middle East right now. Constitution-makers in these places are trying to figure out what to include and what not to include. They’re frequently given a lot of advice—such as, it’s important to protect freedom of speech or it’s important to protect freedom of religion. But it’s not clear which of those protections actually help to improve people’s lives. It might be the case that, regardless of what’s said in the documents, that governments violate rights anyway. So we wanted to see which constitutional rights actually make a difference.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. To what extent had this been studied before?<br /></strong>A. There are a handful papers that have looked at this before, but they all suffer from a few limitations. It’s only in the last few years that there’s been good data on what rights countries include in their constitutions. Also, countries don’t randomly pick which rights to include in their constitutions—there’s a selection bias. Specifically, countries that intend to respect a right in practice might be more likely to include it in their constitution. Not accounting for this kind of bias would be as if you were trying to test whether a cancer drug worked but you only gave the drug to people who were eating well and jogging. The method we use in our paper attempts to account for this. Specifically, our strategy is to find two countries with very similar constitutions, except one doesn’t have the specific right we are studying and the other does. After matching these countries with similar constitutions to each other, we examine whether the country with the constitutional right does a better job protecting that specific right.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Why did you choose these six rights?<br /></strong>A. We wanted a set of rights that are widely used in constitutions, and we wanted rights where there is data available in how well that right is protected.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. What is the takeaway?<br /></strong>A. If you want a constitution that ensures freedoms going forward, our results suggest that the best way to do that is to explicitly provide for the protections through groups independent of the government. When organizations—such as independent political parties, trade unions, labor unions, and associations more generally—are allowed to grow and flourish, its possible that they can help check against future government repression.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span> </span></p> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 23:59:42 +0000 beckygillespie 23964 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Jessica Lenahan (Gonzales), domestic violence, and the Inter-American system of human rights: online resources http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/10/21/jessica-lenahan-gonzales-domestic-violence-and-the-inter-american-system-of-human-rights-online-resources/ <a href='http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/10/21/jessica-lenahan-gonzales-domestic-violence-and-the-inter-american-system-of-human-rights-online-resources/'><img width="120" height="79" src="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/OAS-flag-120x79.png" class="attachment-post-thumbnail-image-thmb" alt="OAS flag" /></a>This Wednesday, October 22, at lunchtime in Room IV, four Law School student organizations &#8211; the Human Rights Law Society, the Immigration Law Society, the Law Women&#8217;s Caucus, and the Domestic Violence Project &#8211; present the International Human Rights Clinic&#8217;s Caroline Bettinger-Lopez &hellip; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/10/21/jessica-lenahan-gonzales-domestic-violence-and-the-inter-american-system-of-human-rights-online-resources/">Continue&nbsp;reading&nbsp;<span class="meta-nav">&raquo;</span></a> Tue, 21 Oct 2014 22:41:21 +0000 Lyonette Louis-Jacques http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=25287 Richard Epstein on "The War Against Airbnb" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/richard-epstein-war-against-airbnb <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The War Against Airbnb </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Richard A. Epstein </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Defining Ideas </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 20, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This past week, with much <a href="http://www.newsday.com/business/most-airbnb-rentals-in-new-york-illegal-attorney-general-eric-schneiderman-says-1.9510797">pomp</a> and circumstance, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed a massive report indicting the major upstart Airbnb for its dubious short-term leasing practices in New York City. Schneider thinks that his report is sufficient to nail Airbnb to the mast for its pervasive illegal conduct. But on a closer inspection the report looks more like an indictment of the City’s obsolete laws for dealing with new disruptive technology. Why complain about a business that matches many an out-of-town traveler with willing hosts, for a fee that leaves both sides happy, even after Airbnb takes its cut?</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This past week, with much&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newsday.com/business/most-airbnb-rentals-in-new-york-illegal-attorney-general-eric-schneiderman-says-1.9510797">pomp</a>&nbsp;and circumstance, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed a massive report indicting the major upstart&nbsp;Airbnb&nbsp;for its dubious short-term leasing practices in New York City. Schneider thinks that his report is sufficient to nail Airbnb to the mast for its pervasive illegal conduct. But on a closer inspection the report looks more like an indictment of the City’s obsolete laws for dealing with new disruptive technology. Why complain about a business that matches many an out-of-town traveler with willing hosts, for a fee that leaves both sides happy, even after Airbnb takes its cut?</p> <p>New York State is going after the enormously popular company now that its re