News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Chicago Daily Law Bulletin Highlights Law School Clinics http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/chicago-daily-law-bulletin-highlights-law-school-clinics <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Clinics Matter, But How Much? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jack Silverstein </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chicago Daily Law Bulletin </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">May 26, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>These clinics are nothing new. The University of Chicago Law School launched its clinical program in the late 1950s.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ain’t nothing like the real thing. So said R&amp;B hitmakers Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell.</p> <p>In legal education, the closest thing to the real thing — a job — is a clinic.</p> <p>“They are the gold standard in experiential learning,” said Loyola University Chicago School of Law clinical professor Bruce A. Boyer.</p> <p>“Experiential learning” is among the most popular buzzwords in legal education today, marching hand-in-hand with its close cousin “practice-ready.”</p> <p>The former is intended to create the latter. That’s the idea, anyway.</p> <p>Contained in “experiential learning” are three teaching modules: field placements (externships and internships); simulations (doctrinal courses which present students with a fact pattern they must solve); and clinics.</p> <p>These clinics are nothing new. The University of Chicago Law School launched its clinical program in the late 1950s. They became more prevalent in 1968 with a series of grants from the Ford Foundation. Among the automaker’s funded clinics was Northwestern’s, established in 1968 by Gary S. Laser.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.chicagolawbulletin.com/Law-Day/2015/Law-School-Clinics-LD2015.aspx" title="http://www.chicagolawbulletin.com/Law-Day/2015/Law-School-Clinics-LD2015.aspx">http://www.chicagolawbulletin.com/Law-Day/2015/Law-School-Clinics-LD2015...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 01 May 2015 17:23:35 +0000 willcanderson 27567 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Dan Johnson, '00, on Having Barack Obama as a Teacher http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/dan-johnson-00-having-barack-obama-teacher <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Let me tell you a little bit about that teacher, Barack Obama.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.takepart.com/article/2015/04/30/barack-obama-was-my-teacher?cmpid=organic-share-twitter" title="http://www.takepart.com/article/2015/04/30/barack-obama-was-my-teacher?cmpid=organic-share-twitter">http://www.takepart.com/article/2015/04/30/barack-obama-was-my-teacher?c...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr"><span>I attended the University of Chicago Law School in the late 1990s, and one of the professors was a man in his 30s. He had two young daughters, two large&nbsp;<a class="tplinkpos" href="http://www.takepart.com/video/2014/04/24/first-look-new-doc-exposing-student-loan-debt-crisis" target="_blank">student-loan debt loads</a>, and three jobs. He was a lawyer in a civil rights firm, a state senator making the 180-mile drive to Springfield, and a teacher at the law school. To find the time to teach classes when the Illinois General Assembly was meeting in Springfield, he would come to the law school Monday mornings at 8 a.m. for a 90-minute class, then come back Friday afternoons at 4 p.m. for the second 90-minute class.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Let me tell you a little bit about that teacher, Barack Obama.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Law professors sometimes behave like the smartest people in the room, if not the world. They pontificate to the class and encourage students to marvel at their eloquence and faculties. Not Professor Obama. He insisted on class discussions and required students to share their views and defend them. Even though he probably was the smartest guy in the room, he never acted like it.</span></p> Fri, 01 May 2015 16:43:52 +0000 willcanderson 27565 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Tom Ginsburg on Chile's New Constitution Process http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/tom-ginsburg-chiles-new-constitution-process <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tom Ginsburg: &quot;El Gobierno Debe Reconocer que este Proceso Toma Tiempo&quot; </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Paula Namur </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pulso </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">May 1, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>(Translated from Spanish)</p> <p>Tom Ginsburg, professor of international law at the University of Chicago, is also co-director of the Comparative Constitutions Project, which has analyzed more than 200 countries worldwide, including Chile.&nbsp;<span>He has visited our country twice and says many have asked the same thing: why a country like Chile needs a new Constitution, considering that there is no crisis.&nbsp;</span>"<span>When you look at other countries, most of the time, new constitutions were made in crisis," says the scholar from his office in Chicago.</span></p> <p><strong>Do you see need for a new Constitution?</strong></p> <p>Although there are many social demands, with the student protests, among others, there was no extreme sense of political crisis that usually helps when you want to make a constitutional amendment.&nbsp;Now, strangely, Chile is in the situation where suddenly there is a political crisis, but not necessarily that Bachelet would want, which is that of corruption.&nbsp;And it is a major crisis for Chile.&nbsp;Outsiders like me have always spoken of the Chilean exceptionalism: Chile is the only Latin American country that is not corrupt, ruled by law, where trains leave on time.&nbsp;But suddenly, it appears that Chile is not so exceptional, after all.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.pulso.cl/noticia/actualidad---politica/politica/2015/04/5-62702-9-tom-ginsburg-el-gobierno-debe-reconocer-que-este-proceso-toma-tiempo-.shtml" title="http://www.pulso.cl/noticia/actualidad---politica/politica/2015/04/5-62702-9-tom-ginsburg-el-gobierno-debe-reconocer-que-este-proceso-toma-tiempo-.shtml">http://www.pulso.cl/noticia/actualidad---politica/politica/2015/04/5-627...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/ginsburg-t">Tom Ginsburg</a> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 01 May 2015 16:40:23 +0000 willcanderson 27564 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Claudia Flores Named Director of International Human Rights Clinic http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/claudia-flores-named-director-international-human-rights-clinic <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 30, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Claudia Flores, a litigator who has served as a legal advisor for the United Nations in Zimbabwe and East Timor, has been named Director of the Law School’s <a href="http://ihrclinic.uchicago.edu/"><span>International Human Rights Clinic</span></a>. She will join the Law School as an assistant clinical professor in the fall.<span> </span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Claudia Flores, a litigator who has served as a legal advisor for the United Nations in Zimbabwe and East Timor, has been named Director of the Law School’s <a href="http://ihrclinic.uchicago.edu/"><span>International Human Rights Clinic</span></a>. She will join the Law School as an assistant clinical professor in the fall.<span> </span></p> <p class="Default">“Claudia has dedicated herself to international human rights and civil rights advocacy and litigation in a wide variety of settings,” said Clinical Professor Jeff Leslie, the Director of Clinical and Experiential Learning. “She is an experienced, highly skilled litigator and advocate, and her strengths in these areas will serve our students well in her new clinical role.&nbsp;Claudia brings the leadership, energy, and good judgment to build on the clinic’s strong record of accomplishment and to take the clinic in exciting new directions.&nbsp; We can’t wait for her to get started.”&nbsp;</p> <p>The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, as well as other substantive law and strategies, to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and to promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors.</p> <p>“I am truly honored to join the vibrant clinical program at the Law School,” Flores said. “I look forward to working with students to promote and protect human rights globally.”</p> <p>Flores received an undergraduate degree in philosophy from UChicago in 1997 and graduated from the New York University School of Law in 2002, where she received the Root-Tilden-Kern scholarship, which is awarded to students who have demonstrated a commitment to public service, academic excellence, and the potential for leadership. Flores is a partner with Hughes Socol Piers Resnick &amp; Dym, Ltd., where she concentrates her practice in the areas of civil rights, constitutional law, labor and employment, and class actions.</p> <p>In her UN positions, she advised governments on constitutional and legislative reforms to increase legal protections for human rights and civil liberties. In Zimbabwe, she advised the government on incorporating human rights principles into their federal constitution, which was approved by referendum in 2013. In East Timor, she focused on legislation promoting women’s equality.</p> <p>Before that, Flores worked for the AFL-CIO American Center for International Labor Solidarity in Indonesia, where she managed program that focused on providing services for victims of human trafficking. She has also worked for the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, where she focused on women’s rights in the workplace.</p> <p>As Skadden Fellow from 2003 to 2005, Flores directed the Immigrant Household Workers Project in the International Women’s Human Rights Clinic at the CUNY School of Law. Prior to that, she clerked for Judge Harry Pregerson of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and, during law school, worked as a law clerk on projects in Tanzania and South Africa.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/leslie">Jeff Leslie</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/cflores_color_print_00409343x9d9dd.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=1294487">cflores_color_print_00409343x9d9dd.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 30 Apr 2015 17:04:57 +0000 beckygillespie 27455 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Closing the Gap Between Youth and Police: Conference Launches Conversation, Solutions http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/closing-gap-between-youth-and-police-conference-launches-conversation-solutions <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 30, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A&nbsp;powerful two-day Law School conference laid bare the painful truths, intractable challenges, and not-always-acknowledged realities of youth/police relations in a series of often-emotional sessions that brought together law enforcement officials, urban youth, advocates, and top scholars to candidly examine the day-to-day issues contributing to the growing national crisis in police/community relations.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Sometimes the most searing injustices register as a shoulder shrug, and sometimes they don’t get mentioned at all. Sometimes they’re written off as normal — even as they fuel a more visibly devastating flash point.</p> <p>This was among the themes at a powerful two-day Law School conference that laid bare the painful truths, intractable challenges, and not-always-acknowledged realities of youth/police relations in a series of often-emotional sessions that brought together law enforcement officials, urban youth, advocates, and top scholars to candidly examine the day-to-day issues contributing to the growing national crisis in police/community relations. Among the major topics discussed: the&nbsp;<a href="https://youtu.be/KQoHG--NeEg">routine interactions</a> between police and minority urban youth that leave deep, lasting scars — “It just make you feel down, like you ain’t nobody,” one teen said — but are often written off as a simple fact of life.</p> <p>“Distrust between black kids and police didn’t start in Ferguson,” Clinical Professor Craig Futterman, one of the event’s organizers, said near the beginning of the conference. “It’s been there for years. And it has done way too much damage — way, way, way too much damage — both to the black community and to police.”</p> <p><img style="margin-right: 10px; margin-left: 10px; float: right;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/img_1201-web_0.jpg" alt="" width="307" height="211" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/youth-police/schedule"><span style="color: #333333;">The Youth/Police Conference</span></a> — organized by the Law School’s Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic and the <a href="http://invisible.institute/"><span style="color: #333333;">Invisible Institute</span></a>, a Chicago-based journalistic production company — will serve as a springboard for the development of concrete policy, advocacy, and research initiatives. The event, which often felt more like a community conversation than a typical academic conference, included heartfelt perspectives from urban youth who described strategizing their public movements to avoid encountering police, as well as from police determined to effect change but frustrated by the barriers they encounter. Participants were not always in agreement, and many of the conversations were, at their roots, about humanity’s deepest frailties: shame, fear, distrust, and denial.</p> <p>“By bringing together people who are not typically in the same conversation and engaging them with the knowledge and experience of the young people most affected by urban police practices, the conference generated ideas to improve our practices around the nation,” Futterman said.&nbsp;“I don’t know if I have ever been in a more engaging conversation in which people who normally walk in such different spheres were really listening to and learning from one another.&nbsp;It was simply phenomenal.”</p> <p>The more than 300 people who attended the conference challenged each other to answer tough questions: Who are the police really serving? How can you expect to change a system if you don’t understand how it works? How can you train implicit bias out of someone if you don’t force them to confront the shame of having the bias? By the end of the conference, the group had begun to search for solutions, a process that will continue unfolding in coming months.</p> <p>“Now the challenge is to sustain the conversation,” said co-organizer Jamie Kalven, a writer and human rights activist with the Invisible Institute.&nbsp;“Toward that end, we're creating means for those who participated to remain engaged.&nbsp; Videos of the panel conversations will be posted online.&nbsp;We're preparing a multimedia report that will frame issues surfaced during the conference, as well as capture the concrete policy, research and advocacy agendas that emerged.&nbsp; And we'll continue to report on the themes of the conference.”</p> <p><img style="margin-right: 10px; margin-left: 10px; float: left;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/img_1372-web_0.jpg" alt="" width="301" height="195" />The conference grew from the Youth/Police Project, an ongoing social research initiative by Futterman’s clinic and the Invisible Institute. The project, started in 2011, has brought attorneys, journalists, academics, and community activists together with teenagers living on the South and West sides of Chicago. Through interviews and role-playing, the teenagers have shared their experiences with police and researchers, and recounted how those experiences affect and shape their thinking and behavior.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Throughout the conference, there were references to Michael Brown and Eric Garner, but the real focus was on these routine interactions between police and urban youth.</p> <p>“The press likes to put the frame, ‘crisis’ around the major ongoing stories, but it doesn’t really fit to describe this phenomena across the country right now,” Kalven said. “It’s not a departure from the norm. What we’re seeing <em>is</em> the norm. What we’re seeing are fundamental features of our society that we’ve managed to live with but not see. What we’re seeing are harms that fall on some of our fellow citizens but not others. What we’re seeing is the sense that there are two constitutions — &nbsp;it means one thing where I’m standing right now and something quite different a few blocks from here.”</p> <p><strong>‘It Just Is What It Is’</strong></p> <p>During one of the panels, Tytania Holliman, a student at Hyde Park Academy who has worked with the Youth/Police Project, read a list of avoidance strategies youth use to avoid being stopped by police, one filled with contradictions: “Don’t walk alone,” she started. “Don’t walk in groups. Don’t make eye contact. Don’t look away too quickly. Don’t move too fast. Don’t linger. Don’t do anything. Don’t do nothing.”</p> <p><img style="float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/img_1471-web.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="164" />The examples flowed throughout the conference: youth so used to being questioned by police that they pull their ID cards out before being asked; a mother of four who told the audience that she was “as much afraid of the police as she was of the gangs,” young people who said they wouldn’t call the police, even if they needed help.</p> <p>“There is so much stuff that young people need to carry around in their heads just to get down the street,” said Forrest Stuart, UChicago Assistant Professor of Sociology. The unwillingness to call police is a “fundamental issue in our democracy,” he said. “Perhaps we can use this as a measure for whether police are doing the job — whether people are willing to call.”</p> <p>These stories are facts of life in many neighborhoods, where “it just is what it is,” members of the Youth/Police Project said.</p> <p>“We ran into some early problems because (the high school students) thought we only wanted to hear the big stories — the stories of someone being beaten down or someone being killed,” said Youth/Police Project Director and panelist Chaclyn Hunt, ’13. “The more we asked them to tell us about the everyday, they said, ‘Why? That’s boring.’ But for us, the basis of the research, and what we learned from it, is that the atmosphere of policing is different here than it is there. They’ve had experiences with police that we can’t imagine. They know things we don’t know.”</p> <p>But this kind of “normal” can have a significant impact on a child’s development, particularly during the critical and vulnerable adolescent years, scholars said.</p> <p>“Young people are not just learning how to behave and how to see themselves,” said Emily Buss, the Mark and Barbara Fried Professor of Law, whose research has focused on juvenile justice and child development. “But also: ‘Who cares about me? Where am I connected?’ And every engagement with police that is a negative interaction is a message that ‘My relationship with you is in conflict. My relationship to the community of law enforcement is as an outsider, as alien.’ And as they grow up, they begin to see themselves that way.”</p> <p>What’s more, the strained relations can lead to a harmful “adultification” of black children, said Clinical Professor Herschella Conyers of the Law School’s Criminal and Juvenile Justice Clinic. “It’s the first step toward making children of color forfeit childhood.”</p> <p><strong>Understanding the Culture of Policing</strong></p> <p>Law enforcement officials spoke of their own frustrations: the pressure to make a split-second decision when a situation is at its worst; the challenge to protect a community without over-policing and alienating its residents; laws and unions that are designed to protect officers but also make it difficult to fire those with records of abuse; incentives that seem to encourage police officers to be heavy-handed and less connected to the community; and a lack of “police literacy” among the general public.</p> <p>“What people fail to understand from a policing perspective is that there is more going on inside that organization than what is being felt on the street,” said panelist Tracie Keesee, a retired veteran of the Denver Police Department and the co-founder of the <span style="color: #333333;"><a href="http://cpe.psych.ucla.edu/">Center for Policing Equity</a> at the University of California Los Angeles</span>. “If we don’t try to bring multiple conversations together, we’re going to be missing some things. The police organization itself has a tremendous impact on the individual, and the leadership has a tremendous impact on the individual. How your officers are recruited, and who you recruit, how you train them — all of those things are part of that larger conversation. What I fear sometimes — and what I see when I have these conversations with the community — is there’s a lack of what we call ‘police literacy.’ &nbsp;There is a want to change policy and data collect, which I can appreciate … but without understanding the culture of policing.”</p> <p>Police chiefs noted that it isn’t always as easy as the public might think to fire a police officer. What’s more, a single abusive officer winds up reflecting badly on the entire force.</p> <p>“I tell all my officers when I swear them in, ‘The day you raise your arm and you take that oath, to a degree, you have lost your individuality because now you represent a thousand other men and women wearing that uniform, and your actions had better reflect positively,” said Jane Castor, Chief of the Tampa Police Department. “If a police officer does something inappropriate, every officer in the nation pays. … I’ve been in this 31 years, and I tell you, the majority of the police officers are good, and are out there serving the community.”</p> <p>Marquez Claxton, a retired New York City Police Department detective and the Director of Public Relations and Political Affairs for the Black Law Enforcement Alliance, said it is essential that law enforcement officials recognize that problems exist — both individual and systemic.</p> <p>“Part of what policing must do is be honest that within our ranks there are some hideous and heinous people that need to be challenged and need to be identified and need to be eliminated,” Claxton said. “No profession has a 100 percent integrity rate. So part of what needs to be done is for us to decide, as police, to stop being defensive and acknowledge that there are some huge systemic and ingrained problems within the profession.”</p> <p>Some argued that outside agencies should be responsible for investigating allegations of police abuse. “Every time you investigate your own crime, you get an outcome based on what you want,” said Harold Saffold, a former Chicago police officer and the president and CEO of <a href="http://communitysafety.org/index.html"><span style="color: #333333;">Positive Anti-Crime Thrust</span></a>.</p> <p>Several participants focused on solutions aimed at building trust between the community and police. Castor said that 12 years ago, Tampa shifted away from specialization toward community policing, a move that allowed officers to get to know neighborhoods and members of the community better.</p> <p><img style="margin-right: 10px; margin-left: 10px; float: right;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/img_1175-web.jpg" alt="" width="247" height="173" />Chris Magnus, the Chief of Police in Richmond, California, said his department has also incorporated community policing, focusing on creating a climate of respect. He said the department doesn’t allow officers to stop-and-frisk — and they not only encourage officers to build relationships in the community, they evaluate them on it.</p> <p>“You have to reward those kinds of outcomes,” he said. “We evaluate officers on the kinds of relationships they build with neighborhood groups, associations, schools, and churches, which many of them are regular guests at. They are expected to identify what kinds of problems the community sees as an issue and work with them to solve those problems. Some are easily solved; some are more long term.”</p> <p>In one particularly tough neighborhood, whose residents had been marginalized, Magnus said he had assumed their biggest concern would be homicides. But when the police stopped to listen, they realized that the big concern was abandoned cars.</p> <p>“We had 6,000 abandoned cars on the streets in Richmond, and to them, those abandoned cars were a sign of a city government that was ignoring something that affected their quality of life on a day-to-day basis,” he said. “So one of the things we did was get rid of all those cars.”</p> <p>The officers also focused on engaging with people in truly friendly, positive ways.</p> <p>“There are a lot of officers who really don’t know how to talk to people,” he said. “They learn in the police academy how to talk <em>at</em> people and give commands <em>to</em> people, but they don’t know how to engage in a friendly conversation <em>with</em> people. And that’s a skill set, and (we can teach) police to do this better. Most officers do want that training … they want to do their jobs better.”</p> <p>While the conference organizers welcomed the various suggestions for "procedural justice" initiatives and better training that emerged over the two days of discussion, they stressed, as Kalven put it, "the priority of accountability."&nbsp;</p> <p>So long as abusive officers can operate with impunity, said Futterman, "sensible, well-conceived community policing strategies will be undermined, if not altogether subverted. There is no way around it: meaningful accountability is a necessary condition for building the trust between communities and the police upon which both public safety and effective law enforcement depend."</p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/futterman">Craig B. Futterman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/buss">Emily Buss</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/conyers">Herschella G. Conyers</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Related coverage:</p> <p><a href="http://www.chicagolawbulletin.com/Articles/2015/04/28/Police-Youth-Conference-04-28-15.aspx?utm_source=public&amp;utm_medium=story&amp;utm_content=Police-Youth-Conference-04-28-15&amp;utm_campaign=sampler">Forum offers perspective on why people won’t cooperate with police</a> (Chicago Daily Law Bulletin)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/img_1287.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=12206159">img_1287.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 30 Apr 2015 15:17:08 +0000 beckygillespie 27406 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Library Catalog & BorrowDirect offline, 6 a.m. – 8 a.m. Wed., 4/29 http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2015/04/28/library-catalog-borrowdirect-offline-6-a-m-8-a-m-wed/ The Library Catalog and BorrowDirect will be unavailable between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Wednesday, April 29 due to scheduled systems maintenance. The Library Catalog will allow searches, but holdings and item availability information will not be displayed, nor &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2015/04/28/library-catalog-borrowdirect-offline-6-a-m-8-a-m-wed/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Tue, 28 Apr 2015 22:16:23 +0000 The University of Chicago Library http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=26939 Brock Worthen, '09, Appointed Flagship Financial Group General Counsel http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/brock-worthen-09-appointed-flagship-financial-group-general-counsel <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Flagship Financial Group announced today that&nbsp;<span class="xn-person">Brock Worthen</span>&nbsp;has joined the company as general counsel.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/flagship-financial-group-appoints-brock-worthen-as-general-counsel-300072657.html" title="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/flagship-financial-group-appoints-brock-worthen-as-general-counsel-300072657.html">http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/flagship-financial-group-appoint...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span class="xn-location">SALT LAKE CITY</span>,&nbsp;<span class="xn-chron">April 28, 2015</span>&nbsp;/PRNewswire/ --&nbsp;Flagship Financial Group announced today that&nbsp;<span class="xn-person">Brock Worthen</span>&nbsp;has joined the company as general counsel. As general counsel, Worthen is Flagship's chief legal officer and will be responsible for providing legal guidance to the company while helping the VA mortgage lender proactively safeguard the financial well-being of&nbsp;veterans. In addition, Worthen will serve as the chief legal officer for several of Flagship's affiliated companies.</p> <p>"Brock comes to us with a wealth of experience in financial litigation. We're excited to welcome him on board and look forward to working with him as we strive to reach the next level of the VA mortgage industry," said&nbsp;<span class="xn-person">Ty Cline</span>, V.P. of sales at Flagship Financial Group.</p> <p>Previously, Worthen worked as a commercial litigator at Snell &amp; Wilmer, LLP, where he assisted clients with both legal and business strategies. He received his JD from the&nbsp;<span class="xn-org">University of Chicago</span>&nbsp;Law School and a B.A. in economics from the&nbsp;<span class="xn-org">University of Utah</span>.</p> Tue, 28 Apr 2015 17:53:24 +0000 willcanderson 27389 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Geoffrey Stone, "Sexing the Constitution: Getting to Gay Marriage?" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/video/geoffrey-stone-sexing-constitution-getting-gay-marriage <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the 2015 Nora and Edward Ryerson Lecture, Geoffrey R. Stone, the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, explores historical attitudes to homosexuality, how laws discriminating against homosexuals first came to be seen as raising possible constitutional questions, and how the nation’s high court has come to the threshold of recognizing a constitutional right of same-sex couples to marry.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0mfxp_k4PXQ?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>In the 2015 Nora and Edward Ryerson Lecture, Geoffrey R. Stone, the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, explores historical attitudes to homosexuality, how laws discriminating against homosexuals first came to be seen as raising possible constitutional questions, and how the nation’s high court has come to the threshold of recognizing a constitutional right of same-sex couples to marry.</p> <p>Geoffrey R. Stone is the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. Stone joined the faculty in 1973 after serving as a law clerk to Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. He later served as Dean of the Law School from 1987 to 1994 and Provost of the University of Chicago from 1994 to 2002. Stone is the author of many books on constitutional law, including <em>Speaking Out: Reflections of Law, Liberty and Justice</em> (2010); <em>Top Secret: When Our Government Keeps Us in the Dark</em> (2007); <em>War and Liberty: An American Dilemma</em> (2007); <em>Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime</em> (2004); and <em>Eternally Vigilant: Free Speech in the Modern Era</em> (Chicago 2002). Stone is currently chief editor of a 20-volume series, Inalienable Rights, which is being published by the Oxford University Press. Stone recently served on the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the America Law Institute, the National Advisory Council of the American Civil Liberties Union, and a member of the American Philosophical Society. In recent years, he has served as Chair of the Board of the American Constitution Society.</p> <p>This talk was recorded on April 22, 2015.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar-position"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Right </div> </div> </div> Tue, 28 Apr 2015 17:33:26 +0000 willcanderson 27387 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu David Strauss: Supreme Court Gay Marriage Decision Will Likely Be ‘Short on Policy Specifics’ http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/david-strauss-supreme-court-gay-marriage-decision-will-likely-be-%E2%80%98short-policy-specifics%E2%80%99 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Lawyers Seek Sea Change on Gay Rights at Supreme Court </div> </div> </div> &