News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en NPR Covers Miles's Work on Community Prosecution http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/npr-covers-miless-work-community-prosecution <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Community Prosecutions Credited With Drops In Crime </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Corley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> National Public Radio </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">July 31, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Placing prosecutors in a neighborhood instead of a courtroom is a different kind of "law and order." University of Chicago law professor <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/miles">Thomas Miles</a> says his research shows community prosecution has had an immediate and measurable impact on violent crime.</p> <p><a href="http://aler.oxfordjournals.org/content/16/1/117.abstract"> Read the abstract for Professor Miles's paper here. </a></p> <p><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="400" height="386" src="http://www.npr.org/v2/?i=336765946&amp;m=336765947&amp;t=audio" wmode="opaque" allowfullscreen="true" base="http://www.npr.org"></embed></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/07/31/336765946/community-prosecutions-credited-with-drops-in-crime" title="http://www.npr.org/2014/07/31/336765946/community-prosecutions-credited-with-drops-in-crime">http://www.npr.org/2014/07/31/336765946/community-prosecutions-credited-...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/miles">Thomas J. Miles</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:51:22 +0000 mferzige 22806 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Chicago Daily Law Bulletin Talks about the Firm Challenge http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/chicago-daily-law-bulletin-talks-about-firm-challenge <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Challenge Accepted: Game On For Giving at U of C </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jack Silverstein </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chicago Daily Law Bulletin </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">July 30, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Even in Florida, George Kovac has not forgotten the University of Chicago Law School.&nbsp;</p> <p>Kovac, a Chicago native, earned his J.D. at U. of C. in 1976, worked in Chicago at Altheimer &amp; Gray until it closed in 2003 and has been in Miami since then at Stearns, Weaver, Miller, Weissler, Alhadeff &amp; Sitterson PA.&nbsp;</p> <p>He looks for any opportunity he can to support his alma mater, so when he heard about the school's Law Firm Challenge, he dove in.&nbsp;</p> <p>"I think this Law Firm Challenge is one of the most brilliant fundraising ideas I've ever seen," Kovac said.&nbsp;</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/file/16521_lb_reprint_u_of_c_jul25-2014.pdf" title="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/file/16521_lb_reprint_u_of_c_jul25-2014.pdf">http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/file/16521_lb_reprint_u_of_c_jul25-201...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/schill">Michael H. Schill</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 30 Jul 2014 21:46:21 +0000 mferzige 22795 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Matthew Prince, '00, Talks about CloudFlare in Forbes http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/matthew-prince-00-talks-about-cloudflare-forbes <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2014/07/30/cloudflare-protection/" title="http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2014/07/30/cloudflare-protection/">http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2014/07/30/cloudflare-protection/</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>“The only thing I have in common with Justin Timberlake is that we’ve both been ‘SWAT-ed,’ ” says CloudFlare CEO Matthew Prince. In 2012 an armed rescue team stormed his company’s downtown San Francisco office ready to defuse a hostage situation called in by a prankster. It was the first of many visits from the SWAT team and Maggie the bomb-sniffing dog. Prince is used to unwanted attention. Federal agents occasionally show up at his offices with court orders rather than guns, demanding to know who’s been sending Web traffic over CloudFlare’s servers.</p> <p>All the attention is a result of what CloudFlare has built: a cheap, dependable service for bouncing malicious traffic away from its customers’ websites and apps. Instead of the traditional approach of selling firewall or intrusion-prevention hardware, which customers have to install locally, CloudFlare offers cheap (and often free) protection in the cloud. Its routers and servers are in 28 data centers around the world and reroute its customers’ visitors to the closest CloudFlare server. Traffic deemed a threat is turned away. The heavyweight in the business is Akamai, a 16-year-old content-delivery network with $1.6 billion in yearly revenue and huge customers like Facebook and Microsoft that depend on it to make their websites load faster. Like Akamai, CloudFlare speeds up websites, but from the beginning it emphasized protection against “ malicious botnets.”</p> <p>CloudFlare, founded five years ago by Prince, his Harvard Business School classmate Michelle Zatlyn and engineer Lee Holloway, initially went after customers that were too small for Akamai to care about, but it has steadily worked its way up to big customers such as Nasdaq, Yelp, Zendesk, OkCupid and the federal government. CloudFlare’s rise parallels that of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, which have grown in size tenfold since 2009. DDoS attackers barrage a site with data requests until it shuts down or can be hacked. The perpetrators can be pranksters, competitors playing dirty, political opposition or extortionists. The FBI is reportedly investigating DDoS-for-ransom attacks on Meetup, Evernote, Vimeo, Move and Basecamp, among others.</p> Wed, 30 Jul 2014 20:36:02 +0000 mferzige 22792 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Police Accountability Clinic: Victory on CPD Release of Abusive Officer Lists http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/theadvocate/police-accountability-clinic-victory-cpd-release-abusive-officer-lists <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">July 30, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Seven years ago, the University of Chicago Law School’s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics">Mandel Clinic</a>&nbsp;successfully represented Diane Bond, a public housing tenant repeatedly abused by a team of gang tactical officers at the Stateway Gardens development. &nbsp;</p> <p>In the course of discovery in the Bond case, the City of Chicago produced lists of officers with more than ten complaints against them over a five year period. Journalist Jamie Kalven, who had written a series of articles about the&nbsp;<em>Bond&nbsp;</em>case, intervened and challenged the protective order as applied to the lists. Federal Judge Joan Lefkow ruled in Kalven's favor.&nbsp;</p> <p>“Without such information,” she wrote, “the public would be unable to supervise the individuals and institutions it has entrusted with extraordinary authority to arrest and detain persons against their will. With so much at stake, the defendants simply cannot be permitted to operate in secrecy."</p> <p>When the City sought a stay of Judge Lefkow's order pending appeal, a headline in the&nbsp;<em>Chicago Sun-Times</em>&nbsp;asked: "What Are They Hiding?"</p> <p>Today we know the answer to that question, because the City has released the lists at issue in Bond, as well two other lists generated in another civil rights case,&nbsp;<em>Moore v. Chicago</em>.</p> <p>Upon receiving the documents, Kalven immediately made them universally available on the website of the Invisible Institute (<a href="https://the.invisible.institute/news/"></a><a href="http://the.invisible.institute/news/">http://the.invisible.institute/news/</a>).</p> <p>“After arguing for the better part of a decade that documents of this nature are public,” he said, “it gives me great satisfaction today to complete the process of making them so.”</p> <p>In 2009, Judge Lefkow's decision in&nbsp;<em>Bond&nbsp;</em>was reversed by the United States Court of Appeals. Represented by the Mandel Clinic, Kalven then sought the same documents—as well as the&nbsp;<em>Moore</em>&nbsp;lists—under the Illinois Freedom of Information Act. &nbsp;</p> <p>More than ten Clinic students worked on&nbsp;<em>Kalven v. Chicago</em>&nbsp;under the supervision of<a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/futterman">Professor Craig Futterman</a>&nbsp;and in close collaboration with Jon Loevy and Samantha Liskow of Loevy &amp; Loevy and Flint Taylor and Ben Elson of the People's Law Office. Two students—Italia Patti, '14, and Saul Cohen, '14—argued the case before the Illinois appellate court.</p> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/police-accountability-clinic-cpd-releases-lists-officers-charged-repeated-abuse">Read more here.</a></p> <p>More coverage of the results:&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-4-chicago-cops-at-center-of-scandal-had-amassed-more-than-200-complaints-20140730,0,1214638,full.story">Cops in SOS unit amassed citizen complaints</a>, <em>Chicago Tribune</em></p> <p><a href="http://politics.suntimes.com/article/chicago/list-shows-two-convicted-cops-were-topic-dozens-complaints/wed-07302014-1030am">List shows two convicted cops were topic of dozens of complaints</a>, <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em></p> <p><a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-4-chicago-cops-at-center-of-scandal-had-amassed-more-than-200-complaints-20140730,0,5746067.story">4 Chicago cops from unit at center of scandal amassed more than 200 complaints</a>, <em>Chicago Tribune</em></p> <p><a href="http://hpherald.com/2014/07/30/city-to-share-files-on-alleged-police-misconduct-with-local-reporter-public/">City to share files on alleged police misconduct with local reporter, public</a>, <em>Hyde Park Herald<br /></em></p> Wed, 30 Jul 2014 20:17:26 +0000 mferzige 22791 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Police Accountability Clinic: CPD Releases Lists of Officers Charged With Repeated Abuse http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/police-accountability-clinic-cpd-releases-lists-officers-charged-repeated-abuse <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> CPD Releases Lists of Officers Charged With Repeated Abuse </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The University of Chicago Law School </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">July 30, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Seven years ago, the University of Chicago Law School’s <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics">Mandel Clinic</a> successfully represented Diane Bond, a public housing tenant repeatedly abused by a team of gang tactical officers at the Stateway Gardens development. &nbsp;</p> <p>In the course of discovery in the Bond case, the City of Chicago produced lists of officers with more than ten complaints against them over a five year period. Journalist Jamie Kalven, who had written a series of articles about the <em>Bond </em>case, intervened and challenged the protective order as applied to the lists. Federal Judge Joan Lefkow ruled in Kalven's favor.&nbsp;</p> <p>“Without such information,” she wrote, “the public would be unable to supervise the individuals and institutions it has entrusted with extraordinary authority to arrest and detain persons against their will. With so much at stake, the defendants simply cannot be permitted to operate in secrecy."</p> <p>When the City sought a stay of Judge Lefkow's order pending appeal, a headline in the <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em> asked: "What Are They Hiding?"</p> <p>Today we know the answer to that question, because the City has released the lists at issue in Bond, as well two other lists generated in another civil rights case, <em>Moore v. Chicago</em>.</p> <p>Upon receiving the documents, Kalven immediately made them universally available on the website of the Invisible Institute (<a href="https://the.invisible.institute/news/"></a><a href="http://the.invisible.institute/news/">http://the.invisible.institute/news/</a>).</p> <p>“After arguing for the better part of a decade that documents of this nature are public,” he said, “it gives me great satisfaction today to complete the process of making them so.”</p> <p>In 2009, Judge Lefkow's decision in <em>Bond </em>was reversed by the United States Court of Appeals. Represented by the Mandel Clinic, Kalven then sought the same documents—as well as the <em>Moore</em> lists—under the Illinois Freedom of Information Act. &nbsp;</p> <p>More than ten Clinic students worked on <em>Kalven v. Chicago</em> under the supervision of <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/futterman">Professor Craig Futterman</a> and in close collaboration with Jon Loevy and Samantha Liskow of Loevy &amp; Loevy and Flint Taylor and Ben Elson of the People's Law Office. Two students—Italia Patti, '14, and Saul Cohen, '14—argued the case before the Illinois appellate court.</p> <p>On March 10 of this year, the Illinois appellate court held in <em>Kalven v. Chicago</em> that documents bearing on allegations of police abuse are public information. On July 11, the Emanuel administration announced it would not appeal <em>Kalven </em>and outlined its new transparency policy for implementing the decision.</p> <p>“The Chicago Police Department is opening itself to the public in an historic way, paving the path toward a new era of police accountability. The Lists released by the City are a powerful tool—they have the potential to reveal officers who have engaged in patterns of serious abuse,” said Professor Futterman.&nbsp;</p> <p>“For far too long, the Department has refused to investigate these patterns,” Futterman added. &nbsp;“These lists can help us weed out officers who destroy innocent lives and dishonor the thousands of officers who protect and serve us every day. The impunity with which those abusive officers have operated has broken the public trust, resulting in historically low clearance rates for solving violent crime in many Chicago neighborhoods. It’s up to all of us to use this tool to create a better and more effective Police Department.” &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/futterman">Craig B. Futterman</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h2>NEWS COVERAGE OF THE CASE</h2> <p><a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-4-chicago-cops-at-center-of-scandal-had-amassed-more-than-200-complaints-20140730,0,1214638,full.story">Cops in SOS unit amassed citizen complaints</a>,&nbsp;<em>Chicago Tribune</em></p> <p><a href="http://politics.suntimes.com/article/chicago/list-shows-two-convicted-cops-were-topic-dozens-complaints/wed-07302014-1030am">List shows two convicted cops were topic of dozens of complaints</a>,&nbsp;<em>Chicago Sun-Times</em></p> <p><a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-4-chicago-cops-at-center-of-scandal-had-amassed-more-than-200-complaints-20140730,0,5746067.story">4 Chicago cops from unit at center of scandal amassed more than 200 complaints</a>,&nbsp;<em>Chicago Tribune</em></p> <p><a href="http://hpherald.com/2014/07/30/city-to-share-files-on-alleged-police-misconduct-with-local-reporter-public/">City to share files on alleged police misconduct with local reporter, public</a>,&nbsp;<em>Hyde Park Herald</em></p> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:13:58 +0000 mferzige 22783 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Roin Discusses Illinois Pension Problems on Chicago Tonight http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/roin-discusses-illinois-pension-problems-chicago-tonight <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pension Problems </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chicago Tonight </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">July 29, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>From the <em>Chicago Tonight</em> website:&nbsp;</p> <p>Pension liabilities continue to plague the state's fiscal health yet legislation attempting to fix the problem are stuck in the court system. Some lawmakers are looking to amend the constitution in order to fix the problem down the road. How will these plans shake out and who will be on the hook for the money the state does not have to pay its workers? We discuss tonight with Republican state Rep. Thomas Morrison, University of Chicago professor of law Julie Roin, and president of Illinois Federation of Teachers Dan Montgomery.</p> <p><iframe scrolling="no" style="width:640px; height:360px;" src="http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/sites/all/modules/coveapi/cove_cache.php?filter_tp_media_object_id=2365297368"></iframe></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2014/07/28/pension-problems" title="http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2014/07/28/pension-problems">http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2014/07/28/pension-problems</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/roin">Julie Roin</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 29 Jul 2014 21:27:24 +0000 mferzige 22775 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Angela Harris, '86, Interviewed About Her New Book, Presumed Incompetent http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/angela-harris-86-interviewed-about-her-new-book-presumed-incompetent <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/24902-interview-corporatization-of-universities-leads-to-increased-academic-career-bias" title="http://www.truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/24902-interview-corporatization-of-universities-leads-to-increased-academic-career-bias">http://www.truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/24902-interview-corporati...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Presumed Incompetent</em> is a courageous, ground-breaking book by women of color that exposes the destructive secret of academia: Universities frequently are biased against bestowing tenure on professors who are not white and of the upper and middle classes. Not only that, nonwhites - people who have worked their way up in higher education from the lower classes - and LGBTQ academics, in general, are frequently looked down upon, viewed as not being as competent as white "members of the club." They are considered - in many cases - "trophy hires" to meet diversity goals, but let go before receiving tenure.</p> <p>Truthout Progressive Pick of the Week Editor Mark Karlin recently interviewed <em>Presumed Incompetent</em> coeditor Angela P. Harris, a law professor at the University of Califonia at Davis, about the challenges facing nonwhite and nonheterosexual academics and the increasing impact of the corporatization of universities:</p> <p>Karlin: What was the motivation of you and your Presumed Incompetent coeditors to debunk the general public perception of universities as liberal bastions of academia that embrace professors on merit without regard to gender, class, race or sexual orientation?</p> <p>Harris: To be honest, we were motivated by our own personal experiences. As women of color faculty ourselves, all of us had faced the "presumption of incompetence" in our own lives, and we suspected the four of us were not alone. We hoped that pulling together a collection of empirical studies, literature reviews and personal stories and essays would help other individual women who were struggling, as well as providing a resource for administrators and others who have power to change procedures and affect the culture of their institutions.</p> <p>Read more at <a href="http://www.truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/24902-interview-corporatization-of-universities-leads-to-increased-academic-career-bias">Truthout</a>.&nbsp;</p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:01:33 +0000 mferzige 22755 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu New Book Tells of Law School Alumna’s Freedom Ride http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/new-book-tells-law-school-alumna%E2%80%99s-freedom-ride <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Meredith Heagney </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Office of Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">July 25, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Carol Ruth Silver, ‘64, was 22 years old and about to start law school when she decided to ride a bus into Mississippi with five men, three white and two black, well aware that their journey would result in her arrest.</p> <p>In a May 1961 entry from her diary, the subject of the new book <em>Freedom Rider Diary: Smuggled Notes from Parchman Prison</em>, Silver wondered, “would the University of Chicago refuse me a scholarship or even kick me out of law school if it found out that I had a jail record?”</p> <p>Despite her fears, the next month Silver boarded a Greyhound bus for Jackson on one of more than 60 Freedom Rides that took place that spring and summer. The Freedom Riders were protesting segregation in the Jim Crow South and testing a 1960 Supreme Court decision that declared segregated facilities for interstate passengers illegal. They were often met not only by police but also violent mobs. &nbsp;</p> <p>Silver was arrested in Jackson and charged with breach of peace for refusing to move out of the so-called “colored waiting room” at the bus stop. She spent forty days behind bars, including time at the maximum security Parchman prison. Amazingly, Silver managed to keep a journal on tiny, hidden scraps of paper, detailing her daily life inside Parchman. That journal was later turned into a manuscri