News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Halloween reading! http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/10/30/halloween-reading/ What Law Library would be complete without contemporary accounts of famous trials?  Certainly not the D&#8217;Angelo Law Library.  And, in the spirit of the season, here are some not-to-be-missed titles: What happened in Salem? Documents pertaining to the seventeenth-century witchcraft &#8230; <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/10/30/halloween-reading/">Continue&#160;reading&#160;<span class="meta-nav">&#187;</span></a> Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:49:58 +0000 Margaret Schilt http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/?p=25503 Lin & Templeton, "Carbon Emission Regulations" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/lin-templeton-carbon-emission-regulations <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/174404001&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A Debate: Carbon Emission Regulations</p> <p>With Elbert Lin and Professor Mark Templeton</p> <p>Moderated by Sean Helle</p> <p>Elbert Lin is the Solicitor General of West Virginia. Before that, he was a Partner at Wiley Rein, LLP. He has significant experience before federal and state courts and administrative agencies and has assisted clients with a wide variety of litigation and regulatory matters, with a particular expertise in administrative, appellate and constitutional law. Prior to joining Wiley Rein as a partner, he was a law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and Judge William Pryor of the 11th Circuit and a trial attorney at the U.S. Department of Justice. He is currently involved with several cases that deal with EPA regulations.&nbsp;</p> <p>Mark Templeton is Assistant Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic here at the Law School. Immediately prior, Templeton served as Executive Director of the Office of Independent Trustees for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Trust. Previously, he has worked in the field of environmental protection and sustainability for McKinsey &amp; Company and as Director of Missouri's Department of Natural Resources. Mark has also served as Associate Dean at Yale Law School and as a special assistant to the US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor and the Delegation to the UN Commission on Human Rights.&nbsp;</p> <p>Moderating is Sean Helle, a University of Chicago Lecturer in Law and Abrams Environmental Clinic Fellow.</p> <p>This talk was recorded on October 23, 2014, and was sponsored by the Federalist Society.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-faculty"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/templeton">Mark N. Templeton</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:46:07 +0000 willcanderson 24040 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Experts Debate Effectiveness of International Human Rights Law http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/experts-debate-effectiveness-international-human-rights-law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 30, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Spurred by Professor Eric A. Posner’s assertions that international human rights laws have failed, philosophers, lawyers, historians, and political scientists gathered at the Law School for a two-day conference that brought rich discussion and new scholarship to an increasingly controversial issue.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Spurred by Professor Eric A. Posner’s assertions that international human rights laws have failed, philosophers, lawyers, historians, and political scientists gathered at the Law School for a two-day conference that brought rich discussion and new scholarship to an increasingly controversial issue.</p> <p>“Human rights law plays a major role in international debate, but it is being challenged with increasing effectiveness by critics,” said Posner, the Kirkland &amp; Ellis Distinguished Service Professor of Law, who organized the October conference with Assistant Professor Adam Chilton. “The purpose was to bring a higher level of empirical sophistication to debates about international human rights law.”</p> <p>Although countries publicly pledge their commitment to human rights, laws are often vague and purposely unenforceable, and compliance metrics are easily manipulated, Posner argues in his forthcoming book, <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Twilight-Human-Rights-Inalienable/dp/019931344X">The Twilight of Human Rights Law</a></em> (Oxford University Press, November 2014).</p> <p>“There is little evidence that human rights treaties, on the whole, have improved the well-being of people, or even resulted in respect for the rights in those treaties,” Posner writes in the book’s introduction. “Human rights law reflects a kind of rule naiveté — the view that the good in every country can be reduced to a set of rules that can then be impartially enforced. Rule naiveté is responsible in part for the proliferation of human rights, which has made meaningful enforcement impossible.”</p> <p>About 60 scholars and students attended the conference. “We had to close registration because more people were interested in attending than the room could hold,” Chilton said.</p> <p>Presenters applied a variety of perspectives — from a look at the progress of women’s rights by Professor Martha Nussbaum to an examination of the hidden successes of human rights laws by scholars from Tulane and Penn State universities — and took on tough issues.</p> <p>“One question that is seldom asked in human rights scholarship is how we measure success,” Chilton said. “Political scientists, for example, have considered any evidence showing that human rights treaties have a statistically significant impact on human rights practices to be proof that the treaties ‘work.’ What this approach does not consider, however, is whether other efforts could have produced better returns than the treaties have. This conference forced all of those in attendance to ask whether the current international legal regime on human rights has been successful compared to other possible approaches.”&nbsp;</p> <p>Many of the participants were more optimistic than Posner about human rights.</p> <p>“The international women’s movement has been tremendously important and very successful, and human rights instruments have actually played some role in building and sustaining it,” argued Nussbaum, the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics.</p> <p>She said it can be hard to tell how much a law has helped, but noted that the <a href="http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/cedaw/">Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women</a>, adopted in 1979 by the United Nations General Assembly, united women, mobilized activists, and signaled in a formal way that problems existed.</p> <p>“It played a dramatic role in building the movement and giving them a common language so they could network and communicate across national boundaries,” she said.</p> <p>These victories existed despite the document’s weaknesses and failures, including silence on issues such as sexual violence and contraception, she said.</p> <p>Nathalie Smuha, LLM ’15, of Brussels, attended several of the sessions and relished the opportunity to hear leading scholars discuss an international issue that she’s followed and heard debated at home.</p> <p>“The people who were giving talks are the kind of people that you read about in newspapers and law reviews, and it was a great opportunity to hear them talk in person,” she said.</p> <p>She left with a general sense of optimism.</p> <p>“I would conclude that human rights laws are not failing, but neither are they sufficient to fulfill their purpose,” she said. “They need support from other non-legal mechanisms, which I believe — after hearing the talks — are being developed slowly but surely.”</p> <p><span> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/posner-e">Eric Posner</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/chilton">Adam Chilton</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/nussbaum">Martha Nussbaum</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/dsc_0608.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=3460279">dsc_0608.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:48:06 +0000 beckygillespie 24022 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Meet the Law Library: Fall Fest Offers Behind-the-Scenes Look at D’Angelo http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/meet-law-library-fall-fest-offers-behind-scenes-look-d%E2%80%99angelo-0 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 28, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Students who&nbsp;chatted up staff at the D'Angelo Law Library's fourth annual Fall Fest&nbsp;might have learned which librarian brews his own beer, why there’s a chevron “crack” in the floor behind the reference desk, and how the library acquires the nodding justices in its U.S. Supreme Court bobblehead collection. Read on to learn more of the lesser-known facts about the library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Dan Scime, ’17, had just finished a round of Law School Jeopardy! in the <a href="http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/law/index.html">D’Angelo Law Library </a>conference room, correctly guessing which park was the site of the 1893 Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition.</p> <p>“I’ll take ‘Around Town’ for 500,” he told law librarians Lyonette Louis-Jacques and Bill Schwesig, before reading the question on the screen and asking, “What is Jackson Park?”</p> <p>It was a sight probably familiar to second- and third-year students: The library’s fourth annual Fall Fest, an afternoon of games, trivia, and homemade baked goods designed to introduce new <img style="float: left; margin-top: 5px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/lawschool_2014-15_2014-10-15_0017_0.jpg" alt="" width="329" height="199" />students to the library’s staff and resources. As part of this year’s event, students played “Name that Tune” in the Fulton Reading Room; tossed beanbags at wood UChicago cornhole platforms; tried their hands at a mini-golf putting green; and sampled cupcakes, cookies, chocolate-covered pretzels, and other treats made by library staff. (A particularly popular item: Margaret Schilt’s pumpkin cupcakes. Find the recipe in the right column). Todd Ito, Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach and a reference librarian, organized this year’s Fest and also planned and staffed the “Name that Tune” station with librarian Thomas Drueke.&nbsp;</p> <p>Students&nbsp;also talked to Lorna Tang, Associate Law Librarian for Technical Services, about the library’s Chicago Collection, which&nbsp;consists of five shelves of about 250 books — ranging from Jean F. Block’s <em>Hyde Park Houses</em> to Erik Larson’s<em> Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness in the Fair that Changed America — </em>as well as DVDs about Chicago.&nbsp;The collection&nbsp;was first set up with funds donated in memory of Thomas Owens, who worked at the library’s circulation desk for more than 40 years. He was fond of law students — and they were fond of him — and he loved Chicago.</p> <p>“Many new students don’t come from Chicago, and this collection will give them a little flavor,” Tang said.</p> <p>The event gave many of the nearly 130 students who attended a closer look at the 695,083-volume library, which was named for alumnus Dino D'Angelo, ‘44, an attorney, real estate owner, patron of the arts, and philanthropist. Students who took time to chat up some of the library’s 25 full-time staff might have learned which librarian brews his own beer, why there’s a chevron “crack” in the floor behind the reference desk, and how the library acquires the nodding justices in its U.S. Supreme Court bobblehead collection.</p> <p>Didn’t have time to ask those questions? In honor of Fall Fest, we’ve compiled some of our favorite lesser-known facts about the library and its staff.</p> <p><strong>The library’s staff speaks or reads 16 languages:</strong> American Sign Language, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Haitian Creole, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Provençal, Spanish, Romanian, and Russian. “It keeps things interesting,” said Louis-Jacques, who speaks Haitian Creole, French, Spanish, and “a little German.”</p> <p><strong>The most popular of the 1,643 titles in the library’s DVD collection is the television series “The Wire.”</strong> Also popular: The Godfather, China Town, Fight Club, and The Godfather Part II.</p> <p><strong>Edward H. Levi, ’35, started out in the library, and he wasn’t paid very well</strong>. Rather than hire him as a full-time professor in 1936, the Law School made him a law librarian and an assistant professor, paying him a total of $3,000 — $125 less than the most junior member of the faculty made at the inception of the Law School in 1902.&nbsp;His library assignment, which accounted for one-third of his original salary, lasted only a year. In 1937, he was hired as a full-time professor and his salary went up accordingly. Levi, of course, went on to serve as Dean of the Law School, President of the University, and Attorney General of the United States.</p> <p><strong>Library Assistant Steve Coats was a U.S. diplomat in Mexico during the Clinton administration</strong>. He worked for several years in the early 1990s in the cultural and press section of the American embassy in Mexico City and the American consulate in Tijuana.</p> <p><strong>The zig-zagging fissure that runs along the floor behind the reference desk marks the division between the old library and the 1987 expansion.</strong> The renovation, which preserved the architectural integrity of Eero Saarinen’s original design<span style="font-family: Calibri;">,</span> expanded the building by forty-five feet to the south.</p> <p><strong>The staff has nearly 350 years of combined library experience.</strong></p> <p><strong>The collection includes about 1,500 books written by alumni. </strong>Those titles range from legal practice materials to fiction.</p> <p><strong><img style="margin-top: 5px; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/lawschool_2014-15_2014-10-15_0006.jpg" alt="" width="380" height="250" />D’Angelo Library Director Sheri Lewis owns two guinea pigs. </strong>They are named Gwendolen and Cecily<strong> </strong>after characters in Oscar Wilde’s <em>The Importance of Being Earnest</em>.</p> <p><strong>The library has 10 SCOTUS bobbleheads:</strong> James Iredell, Benjamin Curtis, Harry A. Blackmun, William H. Rehnquist, John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day O’Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony M. Kennedy, David H. Souter, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “The Green Bag issues the dolls and doesn’t ship them,” said Patricia Sayre-McCoy, Head of Cataloging and Serials. “We have to find someone in Washington, D.C., who can pick them up for us and either send them or bring them back to the library.”</p> <p><strong>Sayre-McCoy is a science-fiction/fantasy writer</strong>. She’s been writing stories for about 30 years and has sold two of them to <em>Sword and Sorceress</em>, a series of fantasy anthologies.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>The library’s staff manually counts heads five times a day so they know exactly how patrons use the facility. </strong>At opening, in the morning, afternoon, evening and at closing, a staff member spends about 15 minutes walking through the library counting the number of people in different locations, including at window tables and center tables, in carrels and conference rooms, and on black sofas and low shelf seating. The counter uses a special form that has a box for each of the six floors and places to record the date, time, day of the week, and academic quarter.</p> <p><strong>Drueke brews his own craft beer. </strong>He particularly likes making low-alcohol English “session” beers.</p> <p><strong>The Law School was re-created in 800 Legos by </strong><strong>Zach Mayo, ’14</strong>. It is displayed on the library’s reference desk.</p> <p><strong>Six members of the library staff have JDs, and all 11 librarians have masters degrees in library science.</strong></p> <p><strong>Margaret Schilt is an art quilter.</strong> The Associate Law Librarian for User Services, who also teaches Writing and Research in the United States Legal System, has been making the quilted hangings for about eight years. There is one in her office now that depicts white cemetery crosses stitched into a backdrop of green panels, and one solitary cross against a red backdrop in the upper-right corner. She calls it “War and Peace.”</p> <p><strong>The library’s entire sixth floor is devoted to foreign, comparative, and international law</strong>. It has a strong collection from the European Union, especially Germany.</p> <p><strong>Eight members of the library staff have attended the University of Chicago, either the college or one of the graduate schools.</strong></p> <p><strong>The framed cross-stitch hanging on the third floor was made by Diane Wood</strong>, Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and a senior lecturer at the Law School.</p> <p><strong>Binding Assistant John Mulholland used to be in the Peace Corps, </strong>working as a teacher in<strong> </strong>Swaziland, Africa, from January 1969 to March 1975. He is also the longest-serving member of the library staff, having started in 1976.</p> <p><strong>The most popular places to sit are at the window tables on the second and third floors. </strong>(Remember the head count? That’s how they know).</p> <p><strong>Senior Acquisitions Assistant Sheila Ralston has more than 10,000 books in her home. </strong>About 500 of them are hers—mostly mysteries and English literature (her college major), true crime, and knitting books—and the rest belong to her husband, a game designer and writer who has been collecting books since childhood. The books are stored in bookcases throughout their home.</p> <p><strong>Julie Stauffer, Head of Acquisitions and Electronic Resources, is an accomplished knitter who first picked up the craft from a “Coats and Clark’s Learn How” pamphlet as a child<span style="font-family: Calibri;">. </span></strong>She’s not the only avid knitter, either: a group of Law School knitters meets once a week in Library Conference Room 211A.</p> <p><strong>The library is busiest at the beginning of Autumn Quarter and during Winter Quarter finals. </strong>Students check out the most items between 11 a.m. and noon, 2:30 p.m. and 3 p.m., and two hours before closing.<strong> </strong>The library space is most crowded between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.</p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri;"><strong>Margaret's Pumpkin Cupcakes</strong></span></h2> <p><em><span style="font-family: Calibri;">The&nbsp;cupcake portion&nbsp;is "Downeast Maine Pumpkin Bread"&nbsp;from&nbsp;allrecipes.com. </span></em></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri;"><strong>Cake<br /></strong></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">1 (15 oz.) can pumpkin puree<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">4 eggs<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">1 c. vegetable oil<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">2/3 c. water<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">3 c. white sugar<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">3 ½ c. all-purpose flour<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">2 tsp. baking soda<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">1 ½ tsp. salt<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">1 tsp. ground cinnamon<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">1 tsp. ground nutmeg<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">½ tsp. ground cloves<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">¼ tsp. ground ginger</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri;">1.</span>&nbsp;<span style="font-family: Calibri;">Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour 3 7x3 loaf pans or muffin tins.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri;">2. Mix pumpkin, eggs, oil water and sugar until well blended. In a separate bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients. Stir the dry ingredients into the pumpkin mixture until just blended. Pour into the pans or muffin tins.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>3. Bake.&nbsp; Small muffins take 20 minutes.&nbsp;Larger muffins take 30 minutes.&nbsp;Loaf pans take 50 minutes.They’re done when you insert a toothpick and it comes out clean.</p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri;"><strong>Frosting<br /></strong></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">10 oz. cream cheese<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">5 tbsp. butter<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">2 ½ c. powdered sugar<br /></span><span style="font-family: Calibri;">¼ c. maple syrup</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri;">Mix them all together and beat well.&nbsp; </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri;">Then frost the cupcakes, and enjoy!</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"> </span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/lawschool_2014-15_2014-10-15_0025.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=2467531">lawschool_2014-15_2014-10-15_0025.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:53:37 +0000 beckygillespie 24020 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Amy Manning, '92, to Receive Award for Leadership from Women’s Bar Group http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/amy-manning-92-receive-award-leadership-women%E2%80%99s-bar-group <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Amy Manning<span>, the managing partner of McGuireWoods’ Chicago office and member of the firm’s Executive Committee, will receive the 2014 Top Women Lawyers in Leadership Award this week from the&nbsp;</span>Women’s Bar Association of Illinois<span>.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.mcguirewoods.com/News/Press-Releases/2014/10/Amy-Manning-Womens-Bar-Group-Leadership-Award.aspx">http://www.mcguirewoods.com/News/Press-Releases/2014/10/Amy-Manning-Womens-Bar-Group-Leadership-Award.aspx</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.mcguirewoods.com/People/M/Amy-B-Manning.aspx">Amy Manning</a>, the managing partner of McGuireWoods’ Chicago office and member of the firm’s Executive Committee, will receive the 2014 Top Women Lawyers in Leadership Award this week from the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbaillinois.org/" target="_blank">Women’s Bar Association of Illinois</a>.</p> <p>The prestigious award recognizes the accomplishments of trailblazing women lawyers who make major professional contributions through service in leadership roles. Manning, a 2014 Chambers-ranked antitrust litigator, has held key leadership posts at McGuireWoods and is chair of the American Bar Association, Antitrust Section, Civil Practice and Procedure Committee. She also has served in leadership positions with the Chicago American Diabetes Association.</p> <p>“Amy inspires us all at McGuireWoods – women and men. She brings so much to our management team and we always count on her good judgment and determination. She is a worthy recipient of this recognition,” said McGuireWoods Chairman&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mcguirewoods.com/People/C/Richard-Cullen.aspx">Richard Cullen</a>.</p> Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:01:19 +0000 willcanderson 24016 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Kevin K. McAleenan, '98, Appointed Deputy Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/kevin-k-mcaleenan-98-appointed-deputy-commissioner-us-customs-and-bo <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson and Commissioner R. Gil Kerlikowske announced on Monday the selection of Kevin K. McAleenan as the Deputy Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.gsnmagazine.com/node/42814?c=border_security">http://www.gsnmagazine.com/node/42814?c=border_security</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Jeh Johnson and Commissioner R. Gil Kerlikowske announced on Monday the selection of Kevin K. McAleenan as the Deputy Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). McAleenan is an innovative, dynamic, and mission-driven leader with more than 20 years of border security, legal, and international experience.</p> <p>McAleenan had served as the Acting Deputy Commissioner of CBP, an agency within the DHS since April 1, 2013. As such, McAleenan becomes the chief operating official of the 60,000-employee border agency. He had been instrumental in the development and implementation of a comprehensive anti-terrorism strategy related to border security.</p> Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:55:00 +0000 willcanderson 24015 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Liptak: Supreme Court, With Terse Orders, Has Judges and Lawyers Reading Tea Leaves http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/liptak-supreme-court-terse-orders-has-judges-and-lawyers-reading-tea-leaves <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Adam Liptak </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The New York Times </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 27, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>WASHINGTON — People used to complain that Supreme Court decisions were too long and tangled. Those were the days.</p> <p>In recent weeks, the court has addressed cases on the great issues of the day without favoring the nation with even a whisper of explanation. In terse orders, the court expanded the availability of same-sex marriage, let a dozen abortion clinics in Texas reopen, and made it harder to vote in three states and easier in one.</p> <p>Judges and lawyers who used to have to try to make sense of endless, opaque opinions now have to divine what the Supreme Court’s silence means.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/us/supreme-court-with-terse-orders-has-judges-and-lawyers-reading-tea-leaves.html?_r=0" title="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/us/supreme-court-with-terse-orders-has-judges-and-lawyers-reading-tea-leaves.html?_r=0">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/us/supreme-court-with-terse-orders-has...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/liptak">Adam Liptak</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/baude">William Baude</a> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 27 Oct 2014 21:21:58 +0000 willcanderson 24011 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Criminal & Juvenile Justice Project Clinic (CJP) -- Significant Achievements http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/theadvocate/criminal-juvenile-justice-project-clinic-cjp-significant-achievements <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 24, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>CJP students have been actively engaged in litigation and reform related to the human rights issue of sentencing juveniles to life without parole.&nbsp; In addition to representing two clients presently serving the sentence, law and social work students have worked with the Illinois Coalition for the Fair Sentencing of Children and other organizations and community groups around public education, legislative reform and training. For example, law students prepared for and participated in a moot court exercise, preparing the lawyer who argued before the Illinois Supreme Court on the question of the retroactive application of <em>Miller v Alabama</em>, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision declaring mandatory life sentences for juveniles unconstitutional.&nbsp; In March 2014, the Court ruled that <em>Miller</em> was retroactive and we are now waiting for the State’s decision on whether to file for a petition for a writ of <em>certiorari</em> to the U.S. Supreme Court.&nbsp; Students have visited our clients in the Illinois Department of Corrections to apprise them of legal developments and to begin the process of assembling and evaluating mitigation evidence for potential resentencing hearings</p> <p>In May 2014, CJP co-sponsored with the Illinois Judicial Council its second “Living Like We’re Bullet-proof” symposium.&nbsp; The symposium held at the Law School was a day long discussion on youth violence and solutions for our communities.&nbsp; Students participated in the planning and coordination of the program bringing together youth, government, community, judicial and other stakeholders.&nbsp; Over one hundred participants attended and the symposium has been aired on public access television.</p> <p>Last week, a former CJP student Manish Shah’98 was sworn in as a federal district court judge for the Northern District of Illinois.&nbsp; Professor Conyers was invited to speak at the ceremony and moved his admission to the court.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:46:32 +0000 cjackson 24006 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project -- Significant Achievements http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/theadvocate/civil-rights-and-police-accountability-project-significant-achievements-0 <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 24, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>•&nbsp;The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic won a landmark decision in the Illinois Appellate Court that established that records related to police misconduct belong to the public.&nbsp; This historic decision under the Freedom of Information Act will dramatically improve transparency and police accountability throughout Illinois and serve as a model for other states around the nation.&nbsp;</p> <p>Graduating students <strong>Italia Patti </strong>and <strong>Saul Cohen </strong>argued the case in the Court of Appeals.&nbsp; Experienced appellate counsel observed that their arguments and knowledge of the law exceeded those of top-flight appellate litigators.&nbsp;</p> <p>This case, brought on behalf of journalist Jamie Kalven in late 2009, evolved from the Clinic’s work uncovering a pattern of police abuse in Chicago public housing.&nbsp; After years of documenting a pattern of police abuse in Chicago public housing, the Clinic obtained and analyzed the Police Department’s internal police misconduct investigations and data concerning the officers who accumulated the most abuse complaints in the City.&nbsp; The Clinic found that a tiny percentage of the police force was responsible for nearly half of all complaints of police abuse in the City.&nbsp; However, those officers had been allowed to abuse some of the most vulnerable residents in Chicago with impunity.&nbsp; While the Clinic was able to win access to those critical data, it was unable to share the records with the broader public.&nbsp;</p> <p>In its March 2014 decision, the Court of Appeals recognized the public’s right to this information to enable the citizenry to fulfill its role of ensuring that law enforcement is acting in the public interest.&nbsp; More than 10 Clinic students contributed to this victory.&nbsp;</p> <p>A fuller account of the Clinic’s work on this project is available at <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/big-win-police-accountability">http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/big-win-police-accountability</a>.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Based on the Clinic’s appellate victory, the Clinic won a consent decree in July 2014 that opened the Chicago Police Department to the public.&nbsp; Going forward, members of the public will have access to police misconduct complaints, completed investigations, and data about officers charged with repeated abuse.&nbsp; This information had never before been available to members of the public.&nbsp; The policy sea change embodied in the decree creates the context to take on issues of police misconduct that have gone unaddressed for decades, identify patterns of abuse, and build the public trust needed to make the Department more effective in fighting crime, particularly in Chicago’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Clinic intends to develop an informational clearinghouse for researchers, lawyers, journalists, law enforcement, and members of the public to improve police accountability, service, and public safety.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Five Clinic students, <strong>Pedro Gerson</strong>, <strong>Matt Streit</strong>, <strong>Catherine Sullivan</strong>, <strong>Joshua Burday</strong>, and <strong>Ian Todd </strong>won a nearly $2 million dollar jury verdict in federal court in Padilla v. City of Chicago, 06 C 5462.&nbsp; A group of five Chicago police officers from the Department’s elite Special Operations Section engaged in a years-long conspiracy to target vulnerable people for false arrest so that they could break into peoples’ homes and rob them.&nbsp; Pursuant to their conspiracy, they falsely arrested our client, Noel Padilla, who had just become a father for the first time.&nbsp; They then dragged him around the city in handcuffs over the course of the next four hours, as they invaded the homes of his family members, looking for money to steal.&nbsp; When they came up empty handed, they planted drugs on Mr. Padilla; they robbed him of his money that he had saved for a security deposit for an apartment for his young family; and they wrote false reports accusing him of a crime that they knew that he did not commit—a crime that could have landed him in prison for the next 40 years.</p> <p>The false charges were ultimately dismissed 278 days later, when the officers’ criminal conspiracy came to light.&nbsp; However, Mr. Padilla endured those 278 days in the Cook County Jail, believing that he may never hold his son again.</p> <p>The Clinic students proved that the five officers committed each of these terrible acts because they believed that they could do so with impunity.&nbsp; Students presented evidence through one of the nation’s leading mathematicians that the probability was far less than one in a thousand that the five officers or their Special Operations colleagues would face any discipline when charged with falsely arresting, illegally searching, or stealing from people.&nbsp; They demonstrated that the officers stole more than the freedom of our client.&nbsp; They also stole the honor of the thousands of good officers who serve and protect the public.</p> <p>As a result of the officers’ malicious conduct, the jury awarded punitive damages to be paid directly from the officers’ pockets to punish them and deter others from engaging in similar abuse.</p> <p>This case involved six years of outstanding work by more than 20 clinic students, anchored by the five mentioned above.&nbsp; Our clients cried tears of joy and offered their heartfelt gratitude to each and every one who fought for justice with them—even at a time when few could imagine that these officers would prey on innocent people like the Padilla family.</p> <p>Each of the students and former students who contributed to this effort deserves recognition for exposing such an injustice, serving a family in real need, and becoming a part of something greater than themselves.&nbsp;</p> <p>A fuller account of our students’ work is accessible at <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/police-accountability-clinic-wins-jury-verdict-kidnapped-falsely-jailed-man">http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/police-accountability-clinic-wins-jury-verdict-kidnapped-falsely-jailed-man</a>.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Finally, Clinic students <strong>Michelle Mbekeani</strong>, <strong>Mike Morrill</strong>, and <strong>Jackie Scotch-Marmo</strong> capped a successful school year with a group of high school students from Hyde Park High School by producing and showing a short documentary film on youth/police interactions from the perspectives of inner city high school students.&nbsp; Led by clinic alum, <strong>Chaclyn Hunt</strong>, Clinic and high school students screened the documentary and facilitated a conversation with the Illinois Racial Profiling and Data Oversight Board, which includes legislators, representatives from the Governor’s Office, the Illinois State Police, the State Attorney General, and various community groups.&nbsp; The conversation revolved around students’ experiences with stop and frisk practices, the lack of police accountability, and its effects on how students view the police.&nbsp; Members of the Board were so moved by our students’ presentation that they have proposed statewide legislation concerning data collection on stop and frisk, training for law enforcement involving the high school students and our film, and public hearings on the issues raised by the students.</p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:42:50 +0000 cjackson 24000 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project -- Significant Achievements http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/theadvocate/civil-rights-and-police-accountability-project-significant-achievements <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">October 24, 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project</p> <p>•&nbsp;The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic won a landmark decision in the Illinois Appellate Court that established that records related to police misconduct belong to the public.&nbsp; This historic decision under the Freedom of Information Act will dramatically improve transparency and police accountability throughout Illinois and serve as a model for other states around the nation.&nbsp;</p> <p>Graduating students Italia Patti and Saul Cohen argued the case in the Court of Appeals.&nbsp; Experienced appellate counsel observed that their arguments and knowledge of the law exceeded those of top-flight appellate litigators.&nbsp;</p> <p>This case, brought on behalf of journalist Jamie Kalven in late 2009, evolved from the Clinic’s work uncovering a pattern of police abuse in Chicago public housing.&nbsp; After years of documenting a pattern of police abuse in Chicago public housing, the Clinic obtained and analyzed the Police Department’s internal police misconduct investigations and data concerning the officers who accumulated the most abuse complaints in the City.&nbsp; The Clinic found that a tiny percentage of the police force was responsible for nearly half of all complaints of police abuse in the City.&nbsp; However, those officers had been allowed to abuse some of the most vulnerable residents in Chicago with impunity.&nbsp; While the Clinic was able to win access to those critical data, it was unable to share the records with the broader public.&nbsp;</p> <p>In its March 2014 decision, the Court of Appeals recognized the public’s right to this information to enable the citizenry to fulfill its role of ensuring that law enforcement is acting in the public interest.&nbsp; More than 10 Clinic students contributed to this victory.&nbsp;</p> <p>A fuller account of the Clinic’s work on this project is available at <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/big-win-police-accountability">http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/big-win-police-accountability</a>.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Based on the Clinic’s appellate victory, the Clinic won a consent decree in July 2014 that opened the Chicago Police Department to the public.&nbsp; Going forward, members of the public will have access to police misconduct complaints, completed investigations, and data about officers charged with repeated abuse.&nbsp; This information had never before been available to members of the public.&nbsp; The policy sea change embodied in the decree creates the context to take on issues of police misconduct that have gone unaddressed for decades, identify patterns of abuse, and build the public trust needed to make the Department more effective in fighting crime, particularly in Chicago’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Clinic intends to develop an informational clearinghouse for researchers, lawyers, journalists, law enforcement, and members of the public to improve police accountability, service, and public safety.</p> <p>•&nbsp;Five Clinic students, Pedro Gerson, Matt Streit, Catherine Sullivan, Joshua Burday, and Ian Todd won a nearly $2 million dollar jury verdict in federal court in Padilla v. City of Chicago, 06 C 5462.&nbsp; A group of five Chicago police officers from the Department’s elite Special Operations Section engaged in a years-long conspiracy to target vulnerable people for false arrest so that they could break into peoples’ homes and rob them.&nbsp; Pursuant to their conspiracy, they falsely arrested our client, Noel Padilla, who had just become a father for the first time.&nbsp; They then dragged him around the city in handcuffs over the course of the next four hours, as they invaded the homes of his family members, looking for money to steal.&nbsp; When they came up empty handed, they planted drugs on Mr. Padilla; they robbed him of his money that he had saved for a security deposit for an apartment for his young family; and they wrote false reports accusing him of a crime that they knew that he did not commit—a crime that could have landed him in prison for the next 40 years.</p> <p>The false charges were ultimately dismissed 278 days later, when the officers’ criminal conspiracy came to light.&nbsp; However, Mr. Padilla endured those 278 days in the Cook County Jail, believing that he may never hold his son again.</p> <p>The Clinic students proved that the five officers committed each of these terrible acts because they believed that they could do so with impunity.&nbsp; Students presented evidence through one of the nation’s leading mathematicians that the probability was far less than one in a thousand that the five officers or their Special Operations colleagues would face any discipline when charged with falsely arresting, illegally searching, or stealing from people.&nbsp; They demonstrat