News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Federal Criminal Justice Clinic Gets Charges Dropped in Stash House Cases http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/federal-criminal-justice-clinic-gets-charges-dropped-stash-house-cases <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chicago Prosecutors Quietly Drop Charges Tied to Drug Stash House Stings </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Annie Sweeney and Jason Meisner </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chicago Tribune </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">January 29, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <p>Federal prosecutors in Chicago have quietly dropped narcotics conspiracy charges against more than two dozen defendants accused of ripping off drug stash houses as part of controversial undercover stings that have sparked allegations across the country of entrapment and racial profiling.</p> <p>The decade-old strategy is also under fire because federal authorities, as part of a ruse, led targets to think large quantities of cocaine were often stashed in the hideouts, ensuring long prison terms upon conviction because of how federal sentencing laws work.</p> <p>Experts said the move by Chicago prosecutors marked the first step back by a U.S. attorney's office anywhere in the country in connection with the controversial law enforcement tactic.</p> <p>The stings, led by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, have been highly criticized for targeting mostly minority suspects, many of whom were drawn into the bogus rip-offs by informants who promised easy money at vulnerable points in their lives.</p> <p>The cases are built on an elaborate ruse concocted by the ATF. Everything about the stash house is fictitious and follows a familiar script, from supposedly armed guards that need to be dealt with to the quantity of drugs purportedly stashed there. By pretending the house contains a large amount of narcotics, authorities can vastly escalate the potential prison time defendants face, including up to life sentences.</p> <p>Earlier this month, federal prosecutors in Chicago sought to drop drug conspiracy charges in seven of the nine pending stash-house cases, leading some of the judges to quickly approve the move without a hearing.</p> <p>In each case, the defendants — 27 in all — still face weapons and other charges for the alleged scheme and potentially long prison sentences upon conviction. But without the drug conspiracy charges, the mandatory minimum sentences for most of the defendants would drop to just five years in prison from as much as 25 years, according to Alison Siegler, director of the Federal Criminal Justice Clinic at the University of Chicago Law School.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-stash-houses-charges-dropped-met-20150129-story.html?dssReturn#page=1" title="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-stash-houses-charges-dropped-met-20150129-story.html?dssReturn#page=1">http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-stash-houses-charge...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/siegler">Alison Siegler</a> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 30 Jan 2015 04:01:36 +0000 mferzige 25316 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Martha Minow, "Forgiveness, Law and Justice" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/martha-minow-forgiveness-law-and-justice <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/188496454&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School,with comments by Martha Nussbaum, Aziz Huq, and Michael Schill.</p> <p>What role if any should forgiveness play in law and legal systems? By forgiveness, I mean: a conscious, deliberate decision to forgo rightful grounds for whoever has committed a wrong or harm. Law may penalize those who apologize and in so doing make forgiveness by the victim less likely. Law may construct adversarial processes that render forgiveness less likely than it would otherwise be. Or law can give people chances to meet together, in spaces where they may apologize and forgive.</p> <p>This lecture was presented on January 8, 2015, at the University of Chicago Law School as part of the Brennan Center Jorde Symposium.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-event"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Event listing:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/events/2015-01-08-jorde-symposium-forgiveness-law-and-justice">Jorde Symposium: Forgiveness, Law and Justice</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-faculty"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/nussbaum">Martha Nussbaum</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/huq">Aziz Huq</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related video:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/video/forgiveness-law-justice-martha-minow">Martha Minow, &quot;Forgiveness, Law and Justice&quot;</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related article:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/news/making-room-forgiveness-law-0">Making Room for Forgiveness in Law</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:04:57 +0000 willcanderson 25299 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Martha Minow, "Forgiveness, Law and Justice" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/martha-minow-forgiveness-law-and-justice <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/188496454&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School,with comments by Martha Nussbaum, Aziz Huq, and Michael Schill.</p> <p>What role if any should forgiveness play in law and legal systems? By forgiveness, I mean: a conscious, deliberate decision to forgo rightful grounds for whoever has committed a wrong or harm. Law may penalize those who apologize and in so doing make forgiveness by the victim less likely. Law may construct adversarial processes that render forgiveness less likely than it would otherwise be. Or law can give people chances to meet together, in spaces where they may apologize and forgive.</p> <p>This lecture was presented on January 8, 2015, at the University of Chicago Law School as part of the Brennan Center Jorde Symposium.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-event"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Event listing:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/events/2015-01-08-jorde-symposium-forgiveness-law-and-justice">Jorde Symposium: Forgiveness, Law and Justice</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-faculty"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/nussbaum">Martha Nussbaum</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="field-label-inline"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/huq">Aziz Huq</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related video:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/video/forgiveness-law-justice-martha-minow">Martha Minow, &quot;Forgiveness, Law and Justice&quot;</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Related article:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/news/making-room-forgiveness-law-0">Making Room for Forgiveness in Law</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:04:57 +0000 willcanderson 25299 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Martha Minow, "Forgiveness, Law and Justice" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/video/forgiveness-law-justice-martha-minow <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, with comments by Martha Nussbaum, Aziz Huq, and Michael Schill.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DRXrziqbKTA?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> <p>Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, with comments by Martha Nussbaum, Aziz Huq, and Michael Schill.</p> <p>What role if any should forgiveness play in law and legal systems? By forgiveness, I mean: a conscious, deliberate decision to forgo rightful grounds for whoever has committed a wrong or harm. Law may penalize those who apologize and in so doing make forgiveness by the victim less likely. Law may construct adversarial processes that render forgiveness less likely than it would otherwise be. Or law can give people chances to meet together, in spaces where they may apologize and forgive.</p> <p>This lecture was presented on January 8, 2015, at the University of Chicago Law School as part of the <a href=" http://www.brennancenter.org/brennan-center-jorde-symposium">Brennan Center Jorde Symposium</a>.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sidebar-position"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Right </div> </div> </div> Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:02:03 +0000 willcanderson 25298 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Criminal Corruption: Why Broad Definitions of Bribery Make Things Worse http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/albert-alschuler-criminal-corruption-why-broad-definitions-bribery-make-things-wors <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/alschuler_0.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Although the law of bribery may look profoundly under-inclusive, the push to expand it usually should be resisted.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Albert Alschuler </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the law of bribery may look profoundly under-inclusive, the push to expand it usually should be resisted. This article traces the history of two competing concepts of bribery — the “intent to influence” concept (a concept initially applied only to gifts given to judges) and the “illegal contract” concept. It argues that, if taken literally and applied to officials other than judges, “intent to influence” is now an unthinkable standard. The article defends the Supreme Court’s refusal to treat campaign contributions as bribes in the absence of an “explicit” quid pro quo and its refusal to read a statute criminalizing deprivations of “the intangible right of honest services” as scuttling the quid pro quo requirement. While recognizing that the “stream of benefits” metaphor can be compatible with this requirement, it cautions against allowing the requirement to degenerate into a “one hand washes the other” or “favoritism” standard. The article maintains that specific, ex ante regulations of the sort commonly found in ethical codes and campaign finance regulations provide a better way to limit corruption than bribery laws, but it warns that even these regulations should not prohibit all practices that may be the functional equivalent of bribery. The article concludes by speculating about whether the efforts of federal prosecutors to reduce corruption over the past 60 years have given us better government.</p> Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:00:27 +0000 willcanderson 25294 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Institutional Flip-Flops http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/eric-posner-institutional-flip-flops <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Posner,%20Eric.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Our primary explanation is that many institutional flip-flops are a product of “merits bias,” a form of motivated reasoning through which short-term political commitments make complex and controversial institutional judgments seem self-evident (thus rendering those judgments vulnerable when short-term political commitments cut the other way).</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Eric Posner </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-nonfacauth"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> with:&nbsp;</div> Cass R. Sunstein </div> </div> </div> <p>Many people vigorously defend particular institutional judgments on such issues as the filibuster, recess appointments, executive privilege, federalism, and the role of the courts. These judgments are defended publicly with great intensity and conviction, but some of them turn out to be exceedingly fragile, in the sense that their advocates are prepared to change their positions as soon as their ideological commitments cut in the other direction. For example, institutional flip-flops can be found when Democratic officials, fiercely protective of the filibuster when the President is a Republican, end up rejecting the filibuster when the President is a Democrat. Other flip-flops seem to occur when Supreme Court justices, generally insistent on the need for deference to the political process, show no such deference in particular contexts.</p> <p>Our primary explanation is that many institutional flip-flops are a product of “merits bias,” a form of motivated reasoning through which short-term political commitments make complex and controversial institutional judgments seem self-evident (thus rendering those judgments vulnerable when short-term political commitments cut the other way). We offer evidence to support the claim that merits bias plays a significant role.</p> <p>At the same time, many institutional judgments are essentially opportunistic and rhetorical, and others are a product of the need for compromise within multimember groups (including courts). Judges might join opinions with which they do not entirely agree, and the consequence can be a degree of institutional flip-flopping. Importantly, some apparent flip-flops are a result of learning, as, for example, when a period of experience with a powerful president, or a powerful Supreme Court, leads people to favor constraints. In principle, institutional flip-flops should be reduced or prevented through the adoption of some kind of veil of ignorance. But in the relevant contexts, the idea of a veil runs into severe normative, conceptual, and empirical problems, in part because the veil might deprive agents of indispensable information about the likely effects of institutional arrangements. We explore how these problems might be overcome.</p> Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:37:36 +0000 willcanderson 25293 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Ashish Prasad, '93, Shares Lessons on Launching a Legal Technology Startup http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/ashish-prasad-93-shares-lessons-launching-legal-technology-startup <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>After careful analysis and developing a&nbsp; business plan, in 2008 I took a leave of absence from the firm to form a document review and electronic discovery company called Discovery Services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.lawtechnologynews.com/latest-news/id=1202716218037/Vendor-Voice-So-You-Want-to-Launch-a-Legal-Technology-Startup?mcode=1395244994797&amp;curindex=0&amp;slreturn=20150029101206">http://www.lawtechnologynews.com/latest-news/id=1202716218037/Vendor-Voice-So-You-Want-to-Launch-a-Legal-Technology-Startup?mcode=1395244994797&amp;curindex=0&amp;slreturn=20150029101206</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I am a legal technology entrepreneur. I started my career like many other lawyers. When I graduated from the University of Chicago Law School in 1993,&nbsp; I followed the traditional path to a clerkship with the Micigan Supreme Court, and then to Mayer Brown as an associate. In 2003, I was promoted to litigation partner, and in the same year,<span>&nbsp;</span>I became the founder and chair of the electronic discovery and records management practice.&nbsp;</p> <p>After five years in these roles, something changed in how I viewed my career.&nbsp; I noticed that there was a need for a different approach to electronic data discovery than what law firms were offering, and I thought I could help fill the need.&nbsp; After careful analysis and developing a&nbsp; business plan, in 2008 I took a leave of absence from the firm to form a document review and electronic discovery company called Discovery Services.</p> <p>Shortly after we launched, DS grew through help from my friends in the EDD, law firm and corporate legal communities. We had a great staff and helped our clients manage the often burdensome process of document review. Here are takeaways that I learned along the way, in the hopes of helping other aspiring legal entrepreneurs...</p> Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:24:16 +0000 willcanderson 25292 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Nussbaum to be Honored in Italy as a “Master of Our Time” http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/nussbaum-be-honored-italy-%E2%80%9Cmaster-our-time%E2%80%9D <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becky Beaupre Gillespie </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">January 29, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="WordSection1"> <p>Professor Martha C. Nussbaum will be honored on Saturday as “one of the most influential philosophers of our time” with a prestigious Italian award known as the Nonino Prize.</p> </div> <div class="WordSection1"> <p>The Italian particle physicist Fabiola Gianotti will present the 2015 “Master of Our Time” Nonino Prize to Nussbaum at the family-run distillery in northeast Italy that has bestowed the awards since 1975.&nbsp;Nussbaum, the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, is appointed to both the Law School and the Philosophy Department, and has taught at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford universities.</p> <p>This year’s Nonino jury — led by V.S. Naipaul, the winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in literature — praised&nbsp;Nussbaum as “a paladin of liberalism, laity, and civil rights, a theorist of global justice and a defender of all living creatures.”</p> </div> <div class="WordSection1"> <p>“Her philosophical analysis is unique, maieutic, and touching, open and critical on the great enigmas of the contemporary society, like the celebration of multiculturalism, and the problems of science and technology,” the jury wrote.&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="WordSection1"> <p>The Nonino Prize was established 40 years ago to “highlight the constant relevance of rustic life” and has grown to include four categories, including an international prize and the Master of Our Time award. The other honorees this year will include Ariane Mnouchkine, a French stage director; Yves Bonnefoy, a French poet and essayist; and Roberto De Simone, an Italian musician, composer, and theater director.</p> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/nussbaum">Martha Nussbaum</a> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:13:31 +0000 beckygillespie 25291 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Research Matters: Lee Fennell on "Agglomerama" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/25239 <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facresearch-abstract"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/faculty/research/lee-fennell-agglomerama">Agglomerama</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-researchmatters-faculty"> <div class="field-label">Faculty member:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/faculty/fennell">Lee Fennell</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/fennell_lee_2010-04-22.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=37107">fennell_lee_2010-04-22.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research?order=nid&amp;sort=desc"><em>Research Matters</em></a><em> is a biweekly feature in which a member of the faculty talks about some of his or her latest work and its impact and relevance to law and society.</em></p> <p>Professor Lee Fennell wrote “<a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/lee-fennell-agglomerama">Agglomerama</a>” for the 2014 BYU Law Review Symposium on the Global Commons. In this paper, she examines how to achieve the benefits of proximity among firms and households while curbing the negative effects.</p> <p><strong>Q. Why did you write this paper?</strong><br /> A. I was invited to participate in a symposium on the Global Commons last winter at Brigham Young University Law School. I knew I wanted to do something about agglomeration in cities. I am interested in spillovers in urban areas and how the land use and location choices people make influence how well cities are going to be able to perform, and how much value they’re going to be able to generate.<span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Has this become more important as we’ve become a more urbanized society?</strong><br /> A. Absolutely. We’ve passed the halfway mark globally in terms of how many people are living in cities. Here in the U.S., 80.7 percent of the population now lives in urban areas.</p> <p><strong>Q. The paper addresses the tension between maximizing the benefits of agglomeration — the knowledge spillover, reduction in transportation costs, labor-market matching — with the negatives. What are the key challenges to assembling the optimal mix of participants to achieve this?</strong><br /> A. The paper focuses on heterogeneity among different actors — firms or households — that are choosing where to locate. Not everybody is equally positioned to generate the same kinds of spillovers. Putting together the right mix can have these really good synergistic benefits, but putting together the wrong mix can dull or dampen the benefits or even create negative synergies. Figuring out how to deal with that heterogeneity is really tricky for traditional land-use policy because tools like zoning tend to promote homogeneity within a particular area. Maybe what we want is the vibrancy of having a lot of different things put together, but then you have to think about how to manage that mix. One of the biggest challenges in this context is information —who has sufficient &nbsp;information to make the right judgment calls about what uses are complementary? We’re used to using markets to assemble information, but we can’t fully rely on them here.</p> <p><strong>Q. Why can’t we rely on markets to achieve the right mix?</strong><br /> A. Because of all the spillovers that are involved. Any firm or household that is deciding where to locate wants to position itself to absorb positive spillovers from its neighbors, but it is not going to be sensitive to the spillovers it &nbsp;produces — whether it is &nbsp;contributing enough, whether it’s generating negative spillovers. The market can price in the benefits and costs that go along with a particular location, but it doesn’t factor in the contributions of the one who is choosing that location.</p> <p><strong>Q. To what extent is an actor’s ability to contribute energy or clog influenced by its interaction with neighboring actors?</strong><br /> A. That interaction is key. When it comes to energy or clog — these are the words I use to describe the positive and negative contributions — it’s not as if actors have a fixed amount they’re going to contribute under all circumstances. It depends on that actor’s interactions with the neighbors. Some scholars have focused on an optimistic story that I think is sometimes true: When some actors choose a location because of spillovers they are going to enjoy, their choice is closely correlated with their ability to reciprocally contribute to their new neighbors. For instance, tech firms may not be in a position to enjoy the spillovers of neighboring tech firms unless they’ve made themselves receptive by undertaking things that are also going to produce spillovers. But there may be many other contexts where actors can enjoy spillovers without contributing much.</p> <p><strong>Q. What are some of the most realistic strategies for assembling the optimal mix of participants?</strong><br /> A. There are some existing models that might be adapted.&nbsp; For example, some scholars have recently suggested making cities work more like shopping malls, where a single owner figures out how to assemble a set of complementary tenants and prices their respective leases to reflect the spillovers they generate for each other.&nbsp; But there can be downsides to concentrating ownership in that way — we might not want one entity to own a significant chunk of a city’s downtown, for example.</p> <p>Another approach would be to somehow compensate entities that are bringing a lot to the table and charge more to those who bring less.&nbsp; Local governments can essentially impose different prices on different parties, whether through tax breaks, subsidies, or deals with developers. &nbsp;But governments may not have the right information to figure out what’s really going to work well. There’s also a doctrinal challenge — the U.S. Supreme Court has put limits on the ways in which governments can make deals with developers.</p> <p>Zoning might also be changed to expressly take account of the amount of energy or clog that different actors generate.&nbsp; For example, performance zoning is an alternative to traditional zoning that focuses on impacts rather than uses.&nbsp; If we can identify elements that contribute to positive spillovers—foot traffic patterns, or numbers of on-site workers—those impacts could be the focus of performance standards applied to those who locate in a particular area.&nbsp; A more far-reaching approach, which I plan to explore further in future work, would involve changing the nature of urban property holdings themselves to make it easier to change things around within cities when conditions change.</p> <p><strong>Q. Why does this issue matter?</strong><br /> A. The value of property these days is increasingly determined by what is nearby and not just by what is happening on the owner’s individual parcel. When the primary way that a piece of real estate generates value is through its interactions with neighboring pieces of real estate, it becomes essential to focus on how to manage those interactions.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><span> </span></p> Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:05:01 +0000 beckygillespie 25239 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Stuart Anderson, "Immigration: Will Congress Fix a Broken System in 2015?" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/stuart-anderson-immigration-will-congress-fix-broken-system-2015 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/188200343&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With Commentary from Professor Adam Chilton</p> <p>Stuart Anderson is Executive Director of the National Foundation for American Policy, a non-partisan public policy research organization focusing on trade, immigration and related issues based in Arlington, Virginia (<a href="http://www.nfap.com" title="www.nfap.com">www.nfap.com</a>). From August 2001 to January 2003, Stuart served as Executive Associate Commissioner for Policy and Planning and Counselor to the Commissioner at the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Before that Stuart spent four and a half years on Capitol Hill on the Senate Immigration Subcommittee, first for Senator Spencer Abraham and then as Staff Director of the subcommittee for Senator Sam Brownback. Prior to that, Stuart was Director of Trade and Immigration Studies at the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C., where he produced reports on the military contributions of immigrants and the role of immigrants in high technology. He has an M.A. from Georgetown University and a B.A. in Political Science from Drew University. Stuart has published articles in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and other publications. He is the author of the book Immigration (Greenwood, 2010) Stuart Anderson is an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute and executive director of the National Foundation for American Policy. From August 2001 to January 2003, he served as executive associate commissioner for Policy and Planning and Counselor to the Commissioner at the Immigration and Naturalization Service. He spent four and a half years on Capitol Hill on the Senate Immigration Subcommittee, first for Senator Spencer Abraham and then as Staff Director of the subcommittee for Senator Sam Brownback. Prior to that, Stuart was Director of Trade and Immigration Studies at the Cato Institute, where he produced reports on the military contributions of immigrants and the role of immigrants in high technology. Stuart has published articles in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and other publications. He has an M.A. from Georgetown University and a B.A. in Political Science from Drew University.</p> <p>Adam Chilton's research interests lie at the intersection of empirical legal studies and international law. His current research projects examine the ways that political considerations affect the United States' international trade and investment policy; when countries comply with the laws of war; the comparative competency of the executive and judicial branches in foreign relations law; and how experimental methods can be used to study whether domestic politics influence compliance with international law. Adam received a BA and MA in Political Science from Yale University. After college, Adam worked as a management consultant for BCG. He then went to Harvard University, where he earned a JD as well as a PhD in Political Science. Before joining the faculty, Adam taught at the Law School as a Bigelow Fellow and Lecturer in Law.</p> <p>This event was sponsored by the Federalist Society and was recorded on January 21, 2015.</p> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-audio-new-faculty"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Participating faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/chilton">Adam Chilton</a> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 27 Jan 2015 22:17:42 +0000 willcanderson 25267 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu