News & Media http://www.law.uchicago.edu/feeds/newsandmedia.rss en Congratulations April’s Pro Bono Volunteer of the Month: Sarah Wilbanks http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/congratulations-april%E2%80%99s-pro-bono-volunteer-month-sarah-wilbanks <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Becca Smith, &#039;16 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Law School Communications </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 1, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Sarah Wilbanks,’16, April's Pro Bono Volunteer of the Month, has contributed 220 hours of pro bono work to the community.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><span><em>Editor's note: The Pro Bono Board, a student group committed to expanding pro bono knowledge and opportunities to students, names a Pro Bono Volunteer of the Month. The&nbsp;April honoree is Sarah Wilbanks,’16. Becca Smith, a member of the board, wrote this story on her work. For more information on pro bono work, visit the </em><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/probono"><em>Pro Bono Service Initiative</em></a><em> website or contact </em><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/students/careerservices/staff#mansuri"><em>Shehnaz Mansuri</em></a><em> in the Office of Career Services</em>.</span></p> <p>Sarah Wilbanks,’16, has contributed 220 hours of pro bono work to the community.&nbsp; She has been involved with Spring Break of Service (SBOS) since her 1L year, when she went to New Orleans and worked in the public defender’s office.&nbsp; This year, she is president of SBOS.&nbsp; She helped expand the program to include a new site in St. Louis and two additional sites in New Orleans, enabling 56 students to dedicate their spring breaks to public service — an increase over the 38 students who participated in 2014 and the 18 who participated in 2013.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The SBOS experience has given Sarah important insight into the criminal justice system.&nbsp; In the New Orleans Public Defender’s Office, each student shadows one attorney. &nbsp;This year, Sarah went on jail visits, interacted with clients, transcribed interviews, and attended court.&nbsp; Students interested in research and impact litigation spent the week at the Louisiana Capital Assistance Center or the Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights.&nbsp; Sarah said SBOS is a very intense experience and provides students with a real opportunity to see what it’s like to work in a legal aid or public defender’s office.&nbsp;<span> </span></p> <p>After law school, Sarah plans on working in a prosecutor’s office before dedicating her career to sexual assault and rape law reform. &nbsp;She is currently in the Domestic Violence Project, and is excited to work with her first client, since she recently received her student 711 license.&nbsp; Sarah has also spent many hours working at the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office.&nbsp; She especially appreciates the practical experience that her pro bono work has given her.&nbsp; “You do have the time in law school, and it’s really important to do pro bono work, where you may not get the time when you work at a firm,” she said.</p> <p>This summer, Sarah will be a policy intern at the Sexual Assault Legal Institute in Maryland, as well as a summer associate doing IP work at a law firm in Austin.&nbsp; In the meantime, you can find Sarah cooking up a new recipe, reading historical fiction, or dominating her opponents at the ping pong table.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/2015_04_sarah_wilbanks_photo.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=950278">2015_04_sarah_wilbanks_photo.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 22:01:35 +0000 beckygillespie 26721 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Alison LaCroix on the Tudor Novels of Hilary Mantel http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/alison-lacroix-tudor-novels-hilary-mantel <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A Man For All Treasons </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Alison LaCroix </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The New Rambler </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">April 1, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Tudor novels of Hilary Mantel – <em>Wolf Hall</em> and <em>Bring Up the Bodies</em>, with a third installment still to come – depict two species of crime: crimes against the state, and crimes by the state.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Tudor novels of Hilary Mantel –&nbsp;<em>Wolf Hall</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Bring Up the Bodies</em>, with a third installment still to come – depict two species of crime: crimes against the state, and crimes by the state. The crimes against the state are variations on the obvious one, given the context of the court of Henry VIII: treason. The crimes by the state, in contrast, are more inchoate and subjective. Indeed, they are portrayed by Mantel as perhaps only potential crimes. Torture, or merely aggressive questioning? Blackmail, or simply shrewd intelligence gathering? The reader cannot be certain whether a crime has in fact been committed, or whether she simply expects that a crime will be committed, given that Mantel’s protagonist is Henry’s notorious&nbsp;<em>consigliere&nbsp;</em>Thomas Cromwell, described in Mantel’s “Cast of Characters” as “a blacksmith’s son: now Secretary to the King, Master of the Rolls, Chancellor of Cambridge University, and deputy to the king as head of the church in England” (<em>Bodies</em>, ix).</p> <p>Throughout the novels, Mantel plays with her readers’ expectations of Cromwell, whose modern-day infamy stems from at least two sources, only one of which was contemporary. Those sources are his brooding, massy, black-clad portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger, of 1532-33; and Robert Bolt’s 1960 play&nbsp;<em>A Man For All Seasons</em>, in which Henry describes Cromwell as one of his “jackals with sharp teeth” and another character calls him “a coming man” (surely a faint-hearted euphemism for the brute whom Bolt depicts as holding the hand of his own protégé in the flame of a candle).</p> <p>Mantel, in contrast, gives readers a Cromwell famous in his own time as a formidable enforcer of the royal will, a man tutored in the armies, alleys, and counting-houses of continental Europe. Mantel’s Cromwell is fluent in,&nbsp;<em>inter alia</em>, Flemish, ancient Greek mnemonic strategies, knife-fighting, silks and woollens, and canon and common law. Cromwell’s reputation in his own time made his contemporaries fear him, Mantel suggests, permitting him to prosecute his work as the king’s servant efficiently and with a minimum of actual violence. By 1536, the year he helped to bring down Anne Boleyn, Mantel’s Cromwell is such a terrifying figure that his mere presence leads the targets of his inquiries to talk themselves into believing that they have been tortured.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://newramblerreview.com/book-reviews/history/wolf-hall-and-bring-up-the-bodies" title="http://newramblerreview.com/book-reviews/history/wolf-hall-and-bring-up-the-bodies">http://newramblerreview.com/book-reviews/history/wolf-hall-and-bring-up-...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/lacroix">Alison LaCroix</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 19:32:19 +0000 willcanderson 26718 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu From Common Law to Environmental Protection: How the Modern Environmental Movement Has Lost Its Way http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/richard-epstein-common-law-environmental-protection-how-modern-environmental-moveme <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Epstein,%20Richard.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In this paper I examine the common law roots of environmental protection as it existed in the law of nuisance.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Richard A. Epstein </div> </div> </div> <p>In this paper I examine the common law roots of environmental protection as it existed in the law of nuisance. At a conceptual level, the insistence on nontrespassory invasions was a good touchstone for liability, when suitably modified to take into account the live-and-let-live doctrine for low-level nuisances. Administratively, the system foundered when discharges from large number of sources harmed large number of private parties. But the centralization of administrative authority is justified solely on the ground that it reduces transaction costs, and not as the source of some novel set of entitlements. Following that rule makes it possible to avoid three major flaws of modern environmental law in both state and federal systems. The first is to allow compliance with statutory requirement to a private party from liability or the government from paying just compensation for the pollution it causes. The second is to allow the government to require that parties comply with extensive permit requirements that halt activities wholly without any showing of imminent or actual harm. The third is to obscure the distinction between harms caused and benefits conferred, in ways that allow the government to restrict, without compensation, private uses of land that do not constitute nuisances at common law. The systematic disregard of the efficient common law rules on pollution and land use produce two forms of mischief: too much tolerance of pollution; and too much regulation of land use in the absence of pollution.</p> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 19:21:35 +0000 willcanderson 26717 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Gerald F. Masoudi, '93, Appointed Celgene Corporation Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/gerald-f-masoudi-93-appointed-celgene-corporation-executive-vice-pre <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Celgene Corporation today announced the appointment of Gerald F. Masoudi as Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, effective June 1, 2015. Mr. Masoudi will be responsible for global legal strategy and will serve on the company’s Executive Committee.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.stockhouse.com/news/press-releases/2015/04/01/celgene-corporation-announces-the-appointment-of-gerald-f-masoudi-as-executive" title="http://www.stockhouse.com/news/press-releases/2015/04/01/celgene-corporation-announces-the-appointment-of-gerald-f-masoudi-as-executive">http://www.stockhouse.com/news/press-releases/2015/04/01/celgene-corpora...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ:CELG) today announced the appointment of Gerald F. Masoudi as Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, effective June 1, 2015. Mr. Masoudi will be responsible for global legal strategy and will serve on the company’s Executive Committee.</p> <p>[...]</p> <p>“Jerry brings a wealth of experience to Celgene” said Mr. Hugin. “His deep understanding of regulatory policy and his significant healthcare-related legal expertise will add valuable perspective to our leadership team.”</p> <p>Mr. Masoudi joins Celgene from Covington &amp; Burling LLP, a leading international law firm, where he is a partner and serves as co-chair of the Food and Drug practice group. At Covington, he has advised multinational companies and trade associations on significant litigation, enforcement, regulatory and public policy matters. Before joining Covington, Mr. Masoudi served as Chief Counsel of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Before joining FDA, Mr. Masoudi served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for international, policy and appellate matters in the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. Before his government service, Mr. Masoudi was a trial and litigation partner with the law firm Kirkland &amp; Ellis. Immediately following his graduation from law school, he clerked for Judge Frank H. Easterbrook of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.</p> <p>Mr. Masoudi received his J.D. from The University of Chicago Law School, graduating with high honors and serving on the editorial board of the Law Review. He received his B.A. in economics from Amherst College, Phi Beta Kappa.</p> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 15:51:40 +0000 willcanderson 26708 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu George Wise, '48, 1924-2015 http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/george-wise-48-1924-2015 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>George Wise, JD 1948, died on March 28, 2015, at his home in Long Beach, CA. He was 91 years old.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>George Wise, JD 1948, died on March 28, 2015, at his home in Long Beach, CA. He was 91 years old.</p> <p>George was an editor of the Law Review. After the Law School, he clerked for Justice Schenk at the California Supreme Court. He then moved to Long Beach where he practiced with fellow UChicago graduates Raymond Simpson and Robert Kilpatrick for many years and later as the senior partner in a firm he established with his daughter-in-law, Susan Anderson Wise, JD 1974, and others.</p> <p>His many accomplishments included his election to the American College of Trial Lawyers, his participation as an observer of the Nicaraguan elections as part of a delegation led by Jimmy Carter during the Reagan administration, and his advocacy as a lawyer for, among others, the American Gold Star Mothers in Brown v. Memorial National Home Foundation, a significant California charitable trust case that secured a housing project for the organization whose members are mothers of U.S. Servicemen who die during their military service. He was married for 54 years to Patricia Eleanor Wise (nee Finn), who preceded him in death, and he is survived by his five children (including Erich Wise, JD 1948), eleven grandchildren (including Caitlin Carter, nee Wise, BS 1999), and five great-grandchildren.</p> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 15:46:11 +0000 willcanderson 26707 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Political Powerlessness http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research/nicholas-stephanopoulos-political-powerlessness <div class="field field-type-text field-field-facultyresearch-photo"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/imagecache/sidebar-image/image/Stephanapoulos.jpg </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>According to long-established doctrine, one of the factors that determines whether a group is a suspect class is the group’s political powerlessness. But neither courts nor scholars have reached any kind of agreement as to the meaning of powerlessness.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facultyresearch-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Author:&nbsp;</div> Nicholas Stephanopoulos </div> </div> </div> <p>There is a hole at the heart of equal protection law. According to long-established doctrine, one of the factors that determines whether a group is a suspect class is the group’s political powerlessness. But neither courts nor scholars have reached any kind of agreement as to the meaning of powerlessness. Instead, they have advanced an array of conflicting conceptions: numerical size, access to the franchise, financial resources, descriptive representation, and so on.</p> <p>My primary goal in this Article, then, is to offer a definition of political powerlessness that makes theoretical sense. The definition I propose is this: A group is relatively powerless if its aggregate policy preferences are less likely to be enacted than those of similarly sized and classified groups. I arrive at this definition in three steps. First, the powerlessness doctrine stems from Carolene Products’s account of "those political processes ordinarily to be relied upon to protect minorities." Second, "those political processes" refer to pluralism, the idea that society is divided into countless overlapping groups, from whose shifting coalitions public policy emerges. And third, pluralism implies a particular notion of group power — one that (1) is continuous rather than binary; (2) spans all issues; (3) focuses on policy enactment; and (4) controls for group size; and (5) type. These are precisely the elements of my suggested definition.</p> <p>But I aim not just to theorize but also to operationalize in this Article. In the last few years, datasets have become available on groups’ policy preferences at the federal and state levels. Merging these datasets with information on policy outcomes, I am able to quantify my conception of group power. I find that blacks, women, and the poor are relatively powerless at both governmental levels; while whites, men, and the non-poor wield more influence. These results both support and subvert the current taxonomy of suspect classes.</p> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 15:09:37 +0000 willcanderson 26706 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu National Law Journal on Pritzker Family's Gift http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/national-law-journal-pritzker-familys-gift <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pritzker Family Donates $3.5 Million to Chicago Law </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Karen Sloan </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The National Law Journal </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-datepublished"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">March 31, 2015</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The University of Chicago Law School has received a $3.5 million donation from the family of alumnus Donald Pritzker, founder and former president of the Hyatt Corp. hotel chain.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The University of Chicago Law School has received a $3.5 million donation from the family of alumnus Donald Pritzker, founder and former president of the Hyatt Corp. hotel chain.</p> <p>The money will endow a Donald N. Pritzker Professorship in Law for a faculty member with expertise in business law, technology, entrepreneurship and intellectual property.</p> <p>Pritzker graduated from the law school in 1959. He died in 1972.</p> <p>“Donald Pritzker was the ultimate entrepreneur, and his professional and personal life was a testament to innovation, leadership and passion—values the law school holds dear,” dean Michael Schill said. “I am delighted and thrilled by the Pritzkers’ generosity and their commitment to these shared ideals.”</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-source-url"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Read more at:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202722174224/Pritzker-Family-Donates-35-Million-to-Chicago-Law" title="http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202722174224/Pritzker-Family-Donates-35-Million-to-Chicago-Law">http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202722174224/Pritzker-Family-Donat...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-faculty-news"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Faculty:&nbsp;</div> <a href="/faculty/schill">Michael H. Schill</a> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 14:57:09 +0000 willcanderson 26704 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Research Matters: Aziz Huq on "The Difficulties of Democratic Mercy." http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/26592 <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-facresearch-abstract"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/faculty/research/aziz-huq-difficulties-democratic-mercy">The Difficulties of Democratic Mercy</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-researchmatters-faculty"> <div class="field-label">Faculty member:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/faculty/huq">Aziz Huq</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="filefield-file"><img class="filefield-icon field-icon-image-jpeg" alt="image/jpeg icon" src="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/profiles/palantirprofile/modules/filefield/icons/image-x-generic.png" /><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/image/huq_aziz_2009-06-18_0.jpg" type="image/jpeg; length=35703">huq_aziz_2009-06-18.jpg</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <p><span> </span></p> <p><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/research?order=nid&amp;sort=desc"><em>Research Matters</em></a><em> is a biweekly feature in which a member of the faculty talks about some of his or her latest work and its impact and relevance to law and society.</em></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>Professor Aziz Z. Huq, Herbert and Majorie Fried Teaching Scholar, wrote “<a href="http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2576870"><span>The Difficulties of Democratic Mercy</span></a>” in response to Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow’s lecture, “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRXrziqbKTA"><span>Forgiveness, Justice, and the Law</span></a>,” at Part II of the 2014-15 Brennan Center Jorde Symposium.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Although Dean Minow took a broader, more international view in her talk, you focused your remarks on the US, and specifically on criminal liability and institutional mercy. Why?<br /> </strong>A. If one is looking for occasions in our legal system in which either mercy or forgiveness is warranted, the criminal justice system is an obvious candidate. We have a criminal justice system that incarcerates more than eight times the volume per capita of individuals than the next most punitive western country, which is the United Kingdom. Historically our criminal justice system has not been this large; its growth is a really a product of the last 40 years. Legal scholars think, rightly or wrongly, that constitutional law has something to say about the appropriate use of criminal punishment, so this seemed a natural place to look.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Despite ample constitutional opportunity for merciful discretion, you argue that true mercy is rare. How so?<br /> </strong>A. Our constitutional arrangement contains a number of institutions that are not just capable of mercy but seem to be set up to distribute it. The most obvious example is the president’s power to pardon or commute sentences. But he’s not alone. In the judicial system, federal courts have broad powers that are characterized as being equitable in nature, and equity is traditionally understood to be a species of judicial power that is capable of responding with compassion to individual circumstances. The jury system — the grand jury as a check on prosecutors and the petit jury as a slice of the community — are supposed to be institutions that play a tempering role in relation to the presumably harsher attitudes and behavior of prosecutors and police.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p>But even a superficial review of the trajectories these institutions have taken, in the twentieth century in particular, show that none has fared well. The president is chary in the use of his pardon powers, and the same is true for governors and clemency boards. Juries, both at the grand jury and petit jury stage, have effectively been sidelined, largely as a consequence of the rise of professional prosecutors and the power the prosecutors exercise through plea bargaining. The counterintuitive suggestion I make is that democratic forces and institutions have played a large role in pressing back against the original constitutional seats for mercy. <strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. So is this tension inherent in American democracy?<br /> </strong>A. American democracy, for reasons that are not entirely understood, has become extraordinarily punitive. There are a number of empirical studies on this, and the leading study links this to the distinct history of race relations in the United States. There’s a terrific paper that shows that incarceration practices changed not in 1960s and ‘70s, but in the 1920s and ‘30s in northern cities in response to the Great Migration. The emergence of African-American neighborhoods in cities like Chicago, Boston, and New York catalyzed very different kinds of incarceration practices. Before that, when northern liberals gave up on Reconstruction, they told themselves a story about why that was OK, and part of that story was that “African Americans will just mess this up because they are inherently criminal.” It was an association that played out in the urban policing practices in the North, and it continued to deepen and accelerate. By the 1980s, there was a clear rhetorical and felt connection between discussions of criminality and discussions of race. Rather than talking about racial anxieties, politicians talk about anxieties about crime, and everyone understands that what they’re talking about is race. This is a story that is distinctive to the United States; it isn’t one that plays out in western European or Latin America.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. Let’s talk big-picture impact: what is the social cost of this evolution? <br /> </strong>A. There is a statistic I like to use when I teach Criminal Procedure: If you’re an African-American child and your father is incarcerated during your first couple of years of life, your chance of dying — your mortality risk — increases <em>more</em> than if your mother had taken up smoking during pregnancy. There are a number of terrific studies that have been done looking at collateral public health- and education-related consequences of incarceration, particularly among African Americans. And, by the way, the effects among African Americans are greater than among non-African Americans, even once you account for the difference in volume. The downstream social cost to families, children, and communities in which the incarceration rate is high is staggering — and, as the smoking comparison brings out, it is underappreciated. No matter what position people take on how the government should regulate smoking, everyone recognizes that smoking kills.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Q. How can our legal institutions recapture the original intent for effective mercy? Where do we go from here?<br /> </strong>A. I’m not particularly optimistic. I don’t see any realistic prospect for that recapturing. However, I don’t mean to be darkly pessimistic. If there is hope, it is going to be a moment of democratic change that enables the creation of new institutions that permanently embody new forms of mercy. And that does happen. Law professors don’t do it. Law can be the form in which change is installed, but it is never going to be the catalyst for the change. Looking at the protests that followed the Michael Brown and Eric Garner killings, it is not unreasonable to think those are the sort of popular movements that might create political space for institutionalizing forms of change.</p> <p><span> </span></p> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 13:57:54 +0000 beckygillespie 26592 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Leonardo Loo, '96, Appointed Business Law Practice Group Chair at Quarles & Brady http://www.law.uchicago.edu/alumni/accoladesandachievements/leonardo-loo-96-appointed-business-law-practice-group-chair-quarles- <div class="field field-type-text field-field-lead"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The national law firm of Quarles &amp; Brady LLP today announced that Phoenix partner Leonardo Loo has been named the chair of the Phoenix office’s Business Law Practice Group.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-aa-source"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field-label-inline-first"> Original source:&nbsp;</div> <p><a href="http://hmapr.com/client-news/quarles-brady-appoints-leonardo-loo-as-phoenix-offices-business-law-practice-group-chair/" title="http://hmapr.com/client-news/quarles-brady-appoints-leonardo-loo-as-phoenix-offices-business-law-practice-group-chair/">http://hmapr.com/client-news/quarles-brady-appoints-leonardo-loo-as-phoe...</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The national law firm of Quarles &amp; Brady LLP today announced that Phoenix partner Leonardo Loo has been named the chair of the Phoenix office’s Business Law Practice Group. In addition to his new role, Loo will also continue to serve as a member of both Quarles &amp; Brady’s Finance and China Law Practice Groups, respectively.</p> <p>Loo, who focuses on mergers and acquisitions, commercial financing, international transactions, securities, and general corporate law involving clients in a wide variety of industries, is also currently serving as the chair of the board of directors for Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. (CPLC), a statewide community development corporation committed to building stronger, healthier communities as a lead advocate, coalition builder, and direct service provider. CPLC promotes positive change and self-sufficiency to enhance the quality of life for the benefit of those it serves. Loo volunteers on the boards of directors for the Arizona Asian American Bar Association and Greater Phoenix Black Chamber of Commerce, respectively, and also serves as general counsel for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.</p> <p>In 2014, he was honored with the Community Leader of the Year Award from the Phoenix chapter of the National Association of Asian American Professionals for his devotion to the community and outstanding service to the Valley. Loo earned his law degree from the University of Chicago and his bachelor’s degree from Stanford University.</p> Tue, 31 Mar 2015 14:24:43 +0000 willcanderson 26655 at http://www.law.uchicago.edu Aaron Streett, "Religious Liberty After Greece v. Galloway" http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/aaron-streett-religious-liberty-after-greece-v-galloway <div class="field field-type-text field-field-auedio-new-soundcloud"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198459479&amp;color=800000&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> </div> </div&g