Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law

    LAWS 95902 - 07 a
    This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan Masur
  • Growth, Inequality, and the Welfare State

    LAWS 74102 - 01 (3) +, m, r, w, x
    This seminar will examine the dynamics that drive growth, the long-term evolution of inequality, and the concentration of wealth. In its institutional dimension, the seminar will analyze how the patterns of growth and inequality are correlated with the development of legal institutions (e.g., property rights, the law of contract, and the law of business organizations) and the welfare state. While the seminar will focus on cross-country analysis, special emphasis will be given to the study of growth and inequality in the United States. Topics will include: (i) economic theory background, (ii) patterns of growth, (iii) markets and contracts, (iv) torts and government insurance, (v) business organizations in incomplete markets, (vi) the minimal state and the provision of public goods, including infrastructure, education, and health care.
    Spring 2016
    Saura Masconale
  • Hate Crime

    LAWS 53704 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will provide students with an overview of hate crime. The seminar will explore the emergence of modern hate crime laws in the United States and the legal controversies surrounding them. We will examine the challenges of data collection and the impact of data on policy analysis. Law enforcement and hate crime prosecution will be reviewed. The seminar will also consider the limits of the legal system to effectively address hate crime through conventional methods and discuss alternative options. Grading will be based on class participation and a final research paper.
    Autumn 2015
    Cynthia Shawamreh
  • Health Law and Policy

    LAWS 78801 - 01 (3) c/l, w
    This course will explore various policies that underlie regulation of the provision of health care in the United States. We will begin with an examination of the principal government programs for financing the delivery of health care in America -- Medicare and Medicaid. This first third of the course will focus on how these programs seek to resolve the tension between controlling costs, promoting quality, and assuring access. We will next address other federal legislation affecting the delivery of health care, including the Affordable Care Act. We will then move to a consideration of policy issues relating to managed care organizations, including the functioning of these organizations and the impact of ERISA on their actions. Next, we will explore issues relating to the behavior of physicians, hospitals, and nursing homes. This exploration will focus on the impact of the antitrust, labor, and tax laws on these entities. The goal of the course is to expose the student to the conflicting law and policy issues that impact on the delivery of health in this country. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination or paper.
    Autumn 2015
    Jack Bierig
  • Higher Education and the Law

    LAWS 52102 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This class will look at the law and its relationships to higher education. What does society expect from higher education and how does the law reflect those expectations? Further what does higher education expect form the law? What is academic freedom and how is it viewed by the courts. To examine these questions the class will focus on a number of current issues that are central to higher education including sexual assault, hate speech, affirmative action and faculty selection and retention.
    Autumn 2015
    Arthur Sussman
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judge the semi-final arguments and select the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Autumn 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 (0 to 3) +, a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Winter 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 (0 to 3) +, a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Spring 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Historic Preservation Law

    LAWS 61302 - 01 (2) l, m, x
    In this seminar on historic preservation law, we will study the rationale for preserving historic resources; the tension between private property rights under the constitution and the public benefit of preserving our historic heritage; the standards for designating landmarks; federal, state and local laws regulating landmarks; tax and other financial incentives to encourage preservation of historic buildings; and governmental regulation of historic churches. The Law School’s historic Eero Saarinen building will illustrate the issues arising in using and rehabbing older structures for modern uses. Prior courses in land use or real estate are helpful. Your grade will be based upon short reaction papers and your participation and attendance.
    Spring 2016
    Richard F. Friedman
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in autumn quarter, and periodically during winter and spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Autumn 2015
    Jeff Leslie
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in autumn quarter, and periodically during winter and spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Winter 2016
    Jeff Leslie
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in autumn quarter, and periodically during winter and spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Spring 2016
    Jeff Leslie
  • Human Rights: From Morality to Law

    LAWS 96106 - 01 (3)
    Human rights are a dominant but highly contested feature of ethical, political and legal thinking in the era ushered in by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948. This subject explores the many pressing questions raised by these rights from the point of view of contemporary moral, political and legal philosophy and applies the resulting insights to the understanding and evaluation of international law as a means of realizing human rights. The course will address questions such as the following: (1) The nature of human rights: are human rights fundamentally moral, legal, or political in nature? Are they best understood as universal moral rights or triggers for foreign intervention or benchmarks of state legitimacy? Should we think of human rights as continuous with what were formerly called 'natural rights', or are they a sui generis notion that came into prominence, as some historians have argued, in the 1970s. (2) The foundations of human rights: Are they based on dignity, interests, God's love for humans, or some other value? (3) The subjects of human rights and the bearers of associated duties How do we determine who has human rights and who bears the associated duties? (4) Conflicts involving human rights and their relations to the common good. Can human rights conflict with other values and how should such conflicts be resolved? (5) Ethnocentrism and cultural pluralism: Are human rights compatible with cultural pluralism? Can they avoid the charge of Western ethnocentrism? (6) The legalization of human rights. What determines the extent and manner to which human rights should be legalized? Is international human rights law legitimate in light of the claims of state sovereignty? (7) The sources of international law. Can we give an adequate account of when human rights norms acquire the status of customary international law or jus cogens? (8) The enforcement of international law. To what extent may human rights be effectively and legitimately enforced through military intervention and criminal punishment. We will discuss these topics by drawing on important recent work on the philosophy, politics and law of human rights.
    Spring 2016
    John Tasioulas
  • Immigration Law

    LAWS 50001 - 01 (3)
    This course explores the U.S. immigration system. The course will focus on the federal laws and policies that regulate the admission and exclusion of immigrants. Topics covered will include: the visa system, deportation and removal, the law of asylum, the role of the states in regulating migrants, and proposed reforms to the immigration system. The course will also consider how immigration law connects to both constitutional law and foreign policy.
    Spring 2016
    Adam Chilton
  • Immigration Policy

    LAWS 96504 - 01 (2) m, x
    This seminar will explore immigration policy in the United States and other countries around the world. The seminar will specifically focus on examining which policies are effective and potential reforms to existing policies that are failing. The seminar will explore topics including the financial consequences of immigration, the impacts of efforts to police immigration, the consequences of guest worker programs, and the determinants of public opinion on immigration policy. Specific attention will be given to studying immigration policy in a comparative context.
    Winter 2016
    Adam Chilton
  • Innovative Solutions for Business, Law, and Society

    LAWS 91304 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    Many business, legal, and social problems cry out for the kind of imagination typically found in the fields of art, design, and invention, yet very few of us take time to cultivate the analytic and creative skills that give rise to truly innovative solutions. In this seminar, we will apply “design thinking,” originally developed by the founders of IDEO (the design firm behind Steve Jobs and Apple), and a variety of related techniques, to important business, legal, and social problems. In business, we will look at how successful innovators obtain breakthroughs and then practice the techniques on simple challenges such as inventing a new product. We will then progress to larger, more complex challenges like designing an organization that invents streams of new products. In law, we will first examine why corporate clients hold creative lawyers in the highest regard. We will then take up a challenge faced today by many corporate legal departments – how to develop a system that ensures compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) while still permitting fast growth in the world’s riskiest emerging markets. To further explore design in the area of law, we will look at legal education and determine how design thinking could lead to more imaginative and meaningful reform. In the area of social impact, we will look at how society can enable universal access to potable water and consider new approaches to building sustainable, green cities amidst the new surge in urbanization taking place in India, China, and the developing world. Grading will be determined by class participation and by performance across three papers. The first paper will examine best practices in innovation. The second paper will focus on a specific case in business or the legal profession. The third paper will address a large-scale problem such as climate change, political polarization, North Korea, or the rejuvenation of Chicago’s South Side – and will require students to work in teams and present their work to the class at the conclusion of the seminar.
    Spring 2016
    Tom Manning
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Autumn 2015
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Winter 2016
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Spring 2016
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Intellectual Property-based Finance and Investment

    LAWS 95113 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    Developed economies once resembled a stable three-legged stool -- manufacturing, services and invention. Today, only Intellectual Property (“IP”) and the value it generates remains to support the standard of wealth developed nations have come to enjoy. IP now dwarfs all assets in value-at-risk with intangible assets accounting for over 75 percent of a company’s market capitalization. The seminar will focus on two general topic areas related to IP. First, the class will examine the multiple markets for IP which exist. Second, the class will focus on IP-based asset management and investment banking practices in an attempt to illustrate how economic value can be extracted from IP as an asset class. The grade is based on a final written paper and will be adjusted to reflect class participation.
    Autumn 2015
    Michael Friedman