Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Federal Courts

    LAWS 41101 - 01 (3) +
    This course considers the role of the federal courts in the U.S. federal system. Topics will include the power of Congress to expand or contract the jurisdiction of the federal courts, federal question jurisdiction, litigation against federal and state governments and their officials, direct and collateral review of state-court decisions, abstention, and related doctrines. The student's grade is based on a proctored final examination. Constitutional Law I is highly recommended.
    Winter 2015
    Alison LaCroix
  • Federal Courts

    LAWS 41101 - 01 (3) +
    This course covers the role of the federal courts in the federal system. Topics will include the jurisdiction of the federal courts, Congress's power over those courts, litigation against federal and state governments and their officials, and the relationships between federal and state courts. There are no formal prerequisites, but Constitutional Law I and Administrative Law are both recommended. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final take-home examination.
    Spring 2015
    William Baude
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w, x
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
    Autumn 2014
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls, who must put a minimum of 7 credits towards clinic work. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls, who will receive a total of 3 credits in 2L year and must put 6 credits towards clinic work during 3L year.
    Winter 2015
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls, who must put a minimum of 7 credits towards clinic work. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls, who will receive a total of 3 credits in 2L year and must put 6 credits towards clinic work during 3L year.
    Spring 2015
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Habeas Corpus

    LAWS 58502 - 01 (3)
    Habeas corpus is a central mechanism for challenging criminal convictions and executive detention in immigration and military contexts. This course covers the operation of habeas corpus in detail, focusing on those parts of the doctrine that are likely most relevant to students intending to clerk, to work as public defenders, or to work in states' attorneys general offices. It is designed to complement the Federal Courts coverage of habeas without excessive overlap. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Aziz Huq
  • Federal Legislative Power

    LAWS 66303 - 01 (2) +, m, x
    This seminar examines the legislative powers granted to Congress by the Constitution. Covered topics include well known legislative powers (commerce and spending), lesser known powers (such as copyright power and the power to punish counterfeiting of securities and currency), and quasi-legislative powers (such as the treaty power). The seminar will focus on how courts have defined these powers, how the courts’ treatment comports with different theories of constitutional interpretation, and also more broadly how the specific powers interact with one another—especially how they interact with the Commerce Clause. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I. The grade is based on a series of reaction papers and class participation.
    Winter 2015
    Joshua Rabinovitz
  • Federal Regulation of Securities

    LAWS 42401 - 01 (3) +
    This course provides an overview of the regulation of securities offerings and trading under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The course explores the elaborate disclosure obligations that this country imposes on the distribution and trading of investment securities as well as the role of the Securities Exchange Commission and private plaintiffs in shaping and enforcing these disclosure obligations. Topics to be covered include: public offerings of securities and the registration process under the Securities Act of 1933, exemptions from these registration requirements and the role of exemptions in the financing of private and public firms, and the disclosure obligations of publicly-traded issuers. The course will also examine the role of anti-fraud rules in the issuance and trading of securities. Business Associations/Business Organizations/Corporation Law is a recommended prerequisite. The casebook required for the class is James D. Cox, Robert W. Hillman and Donald C. Langevoort, Securities Regulation: Cases and Materials (7th edition, 2013) The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Stavros Gadinis
  • Federal Regulation of Securities

    LAWS 42401 - 01 (3) +
    The securities laws govern the way in which a company may raise, and seek to raise, capital; they also impose substantial ongoing obligations upon companies and their security holders in both private and public contexts. Accordingly, the aim of this course is to provide a basic working knowledge of the securities laws to soon-to-be lawyers who will find themselves advising clients that seek to raise (or have raised) either public or private capital. The course will analyze methods of regulation (and possible alternative methods), the financial/institutional context in which the securities regulations exist, and the application of these regulations to real-world situations. Corporation Law/Business Associations I/Business Organizations is a prerequisite, although it may be taken concurrently. LLM students who have completed comparable work in a prior JD degree may register by contacting the registrar. Grades will be based on class participation and a final examination.
    Spring 2015
    Thomas J. Miles
  • Federal Sentencing: Balancing Judicial and Prosecutorial Discretion

    LAWS 47602 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    The Supreme Court has dramatically changed the federal sentencing landscape in recent years, making federal sentencing the least settled and most dynamic area of federal criminal jurisprudence. This seminar examines the federal sentencing revolution in the context of the history of federal sentencing. We study the Federal Sentencing Guidelines and recent Supreme Court cases that try to define the Guidelines’ proper role in sentencing. A central focus of the seminar is the ongoing struggle to balance judicial discretion and prosecutorial discretion, and the fundamental tension this creates between the judiciary and the executive branch. The seminar also focuses on the debate over sentencing disparities. Reading materials are varied and include Supreme Court and lower court cases, the United States Sentencing Guidelines, law review articles, Sentencing Commission studies and reports, and Department of Justice internal directives. Various guest speakers will visit class, including a federal district court judge and an Assistant United States Attorney. Each student is expected to research and write a 20-25 page paper in response to a specific assignment. Students will be graded based on their written submissions and class participation. Second-year students interested in participating in the Federal Criminal Justice Clinic during their 3L year are strongly encouraged to enroll in this seminar, although it is not a prerequisite or corequisite for the clinic.
    Winter 2015
    Alison Siegler
  • Feminist Economics and Public Policy

    LAWS 70502 - 01 (2 to 3) m, x
    This seminar will explore advances in feminist economics and the implications for public policy in local and global communities. Drawing from feminist economics research, the seminar will address the persistence of gender inequality in societies around the world and proposed policy solutions. Topics will include gender relations and the organization of domestic and market work, violence against women, workplace and pay equality, gendered access to resources, education, and healthcare, and gender and property rights. Grades will be based on a series of short writing assignments and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Diana Strassmann
  • Feminist Philosophy

    LAWS 47701 - 01 (3) c/l, e, x
    The course is an introduction to the major varieties of philosophical feminism: Liberal Feminism (Mill, Wollstonecraft, Okin, Nussbaum), Radical Feminism (MacKinnon, Andrea Dworkin), Difference Feminism (Gilligan, Held, Noddings), and Postmodern "Queer" Feminism (Rubin, Butler). After studying each of these approaches, we will focus on political and ethical problems of contemporary international feminism, asking how well each of the approaches addresses these problems. Undergraduates may enroll only with the permission of the instructor. The grade is based on an 8-hour open book take-home examination, or a final written paper if permission for the paper option is given. Class participation will occasionally be taken into account as a positive.
    Spring 2015
    Martha Nussbaum
  • Food and Drug Law and Policy

    LAWS 94501 - 01 (3) c/l, w
    This course explores legal and policy issues in the federal regulation of foods, drugs, medical devices, and other products coming within the jurisdiction of the FDA. It will examine substantive standards applicable to these products and procedural issues in the enforcement of these standards. It will also address the tension between state and federal regulation in this area, constitutional constraints on such regulation, and a variety of other issues relating to the development and marketing of regulated products. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination or major paper.
    Spring 2015
    Jack Bierig
  • Food Law

    LAWS 94503 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar will examine issues relating to food law and food policy. Topic covered will include: food safety, food labeling, food patents, corn policy, regulation of food quality, factory farming, obligations of food retailers, and more. Students will have to write an SRP paper and make a presentation in class.
    Autumn 2014
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Foreign Relations Law

    LAWS 97801 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the constitutional and statutory doctrines regulating the conduct of American foreign relations. Topics include the allocation of foreign relations powers between the three branches of the federal government, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the scope of the treaty power, the validity of executive agreements and the power to declare and conduct war. The course will also focus on the political question and other doctrines regulating judicial review in foreign relations cases. Where relevant, current events will be explored, such as ongoing controversies regarding individual rights during wartime, the post-September 11 war on terrorism, and the Iraq war. Grades will be based on a final examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Daniel Abebe
  • Fourteenth Amendment Seminar

    LAWS 68304 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    The only reading for this seminar is some introductory material about the legislative history of the fourteenth amendment. At the beginning of the quarter, students will be assigned to "courts" and will receive three cases every two weeks to discuss and vote on. They will then produce as many majority, dissenting, and concurring opinions as appropriate. These opinions should rely solely on the fourteenth amendment, its legislative history, and the prior precedent of each "court." Thus, during the course of the semester, each "court" will develop its own, hypothetical jurisprudence. Once during the quarter, each court will be excused from writing opinions and will, instead, divide into two law firms that will brief and argue a case before another of the courts. Regular "events from the real world" will occur based on the opinions each court files. Students enrolling in this seminar should be aware of the following: 1. Part of the seminar grade will be based upon the opinions students sign whether or not they write them; 2. No feedback will be provided on the opinions during the quarter, but at the end of the seminar, students may select one or two opinions on which they will receive detailed feedback; 3. Many students find that the seminar is an intense experience, often involving many hours of intra-court discussion and negotiation over outcomes and opinions. The grade is based on a series of reactions paper and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Louis Michael Seidman
  • French Law Seminar

    LAWS 54903 - 01 (2) m, x
    This seminar is intended for students who wish to get introductory knowledge of the French civil law system, serve French or international clients and organizations and conduct French or international legal transactions. The typical class session will consist of a presentation of a specific French law topic and related basic principles (including constitutional law, general civil law, corporation law, financial transactions, criminal law) followed by oral and written exercises giving students exposure to French court decisions, French statutes and other tools used by French legal practitioners. The grade will be based on a series of reaction papers, attendance, and class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    Caroline Paranikas, Caroline Paranikas
  • Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys

    LAWS 79112 - 01 (3) +, m, s, x
    This seminar will teach the basic fundamentals of accounting to better prepare you to recognize and understand financial business issues related to the practice of law. Topics include key accounting concepts, reading financial statements and financial statement analysis. The class sessions will include guest speakers presenting on current accounting topics such as Sarbanes Oxley, working with the SEC and forensic accounting (investigating accounting frauds). The class is designed for those who have never taken an accounting class and/or have little financial background. There are no prerequisites but you should not take this class if you have taken an accounting class before or if you have experience in finance or accounting. Students may not receive credit for both LAWS 79102 (Legal Elements of Accounting) and LAWS 79112 (Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys). Grades will be based on papers and a final examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Philip Bach, Sean Young
  • Gendered Violence and the Law Clinic

    LAWS 63313 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    When confronted with domestic and sexual violence in our communities, arrest and prosecution of the perpetrator is only one of many potential legal responses. What other legal tools are available to survivors and how useful are those tools? Students will explore these issues through a 2-hour weekly seminar, combined with 12 hours per week of field work spent working at the civil legal services office of LAF. Students will work primarily on family law and immigration cases, while accepting some assignments from LAF’s other practice areas where the legal rights of survivors of gendered violence are implicated. Students will assist with representation of domestic and sexual violence survivors to meet a broad range of legal needs, which could include protective orders, divorce and custody litigation, VAWA self-petitions and U-Visa applications, advocacy in child abuse and neglect proceedings, housing and eviction matters, unemployment insurance hearings, and public benefits appeals. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, develop witness statements, conduct legal research, and draft pleadings, motions and court orders. Students eligible for a 711 license may appear in court under attorney supervision. Prior experience and language skills may be considered in determining each student’s clinical placement. Students’ grades will be based on participation and case presentations in the seminar, performance in the clinical field work, and a series of reaction/reflection papers. Students will also participate in a simulated hearing at the end of the course. Participation over both Winter and Spring quarters is required.
    Winter 2015
    Neha Lall
  • Gendered Violence and the Law Clinic

    LAWS 63313 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    When confronted with domestic and sexual violence in our communities, arrest and prosecution of the perpetrator is only one of many potential legal responses. What other legal tools are available to survivors and how useful are those tools? Students will explore these issues through a 2-hour weekly seminar, combined with 12 hours per week of field work spent working at the civil legal services office of LAF. Students will work primarily on family law and immigration cases, while accepting some assignments from LAF’s other practice areas where the legal rights of survivors of gendered violence are implicated. Students will assist with representation of domestic and sexual violence survivors to meet a broad range of legal needs, which could include protective orders, divorce and custody litigation, VAWA self-petitions and U-Visa applications, advocacy in child abuse and neglect proceedings, housing and eviction matters, unemployment insurance hearings, and public benefits appeals. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, develop witness statements, conduct legal research, and draft pleadings, motions and court orders. Students eligible for a 711 license may appear in court under attorney supervision. Prior experience and language skills may be considered in determining each student’s clinical placement. Students’ grades will be based on participation and case presentations in the seminar, performance in the clinical field work, and a series of reaction/reflection pa