Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Canonical Ideas in Legal Thought

    LAWS 57013 - 01 (2) +, a, m, r, w
    This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will write short reaction papers on the readings, and each student will once during the term facilitate the class discussion of an article, drawing on their outside research to do so. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students are expected to produce papers of publishable quality because the seminar’s ultimate goal is to prepare students for the process of entering the legal academy. Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on the reaction papers, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Abebe, Miles, and Strahilevitz a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 20.
    Spring 2014
    Daniel Abebe, Thomas J. Miles, Lior Strahilevitz
  • Canonical Ideas in Legal Thought

    LAWS 57013 - 01 (3) +, a, m
    This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will write short reaction papers on the readings, and each student will once during the term facilitate the class discussion of an article, drawing on their outside research to do so. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students are expected to produce papers of publishable quality because the seminar’s ultimate goal is to prepare students for the process of entering the legal academy. Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on the reaction papers, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Abebe, Miles, and Strahilevitz a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 20.
    Autumn 2013
    Daniel Abebe, Thomas J. Miles, Lior Strahilevitz
  • Child Exploitation and Human Trafficking

    LAWS 47103 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    This seminar provides a comprehensive, practical introduction to the history and present-day reality of child sexual exploitation, as well as to the interconnected web of domestic and transnational federal laws and law enforcement efforts launched in response to this global challenge. The seminar will use a text written by the professor and a colleague who have the distinctive perspective of two individuals who have spent their careers in the trenches investigating, prosecuting, and adjudicating these intricate and commonly emotional cases. The seminar will offer open debate about child sexual abuse by stripping it of its unhelpful, constricted definitions, and by candidly discussing the state of the law, the criminal justice process, and the treatment of offenders and victims. The seminar examines today's system of federal anti-exploitation laws; the connection between modern communications technologies, such as the Internet, and the rise in U.S. and foreign child exploitation; the unique challenges posed by transnational investigations; organized crime's increasing domination over the commercial sexual exploitation of children; the current state of the U.S. government's transnational anti-trafficking efforts; the myriad international legal instruments designed to enhance transnational enforcement efforts; how, during investigations and trials, to avoid re-injuring the child-victims; the hallmarks of an effective trial strategy; the most promising investigative and trial avenues for the defense; and, what contemporary research tells us about charging and sentencing-related issues, including victimization and recidivism rates. Taught by federal district court judge, Hon. Virginia M. Kendall.
    Winter 2014
    Virginia Kendall
  • Chinese for Business Lawyers

    LAWS 98004 - 01 (1)
    This class aims to help students improve their practical communication skills in Chinese language in the business law context. The instructor will provide background information about several areas of cross-border business law practices in China, including commercial contracts, corporate transactions, securities regulation, intellectual property, FCPA and commercial dispute resolution. Students are expected to practice before and in class their Chinese language skills through discussing the relevant legal topics and completing several small reading, speaking and writing tasks. Students interested in practicing China-related business law in international law firms or other business organizations may find the class useful. Classroom instruction and discussion as well as reading materials are expected to be in Chinese language. English interpretation will be provided from time to time as the instructor may determine necessary. Other adjustments to course materials are also possible based on the enrolled students’ general proficiency in Chinese. The instructor encourages interested students to discuss expected language proficiency in advance. Students will receive one credit based on completion of multiple small exercises in class and one final written project in Chinese (500 Chinese characters or more). The class meets once a week and the students will receive pass/fail grades.
    Winter 2014
    Xin Dai
  • Chinese for Lawyers

    LAWS 98003 - 01 (1) x
    This class offers an introduction to the legal environment of the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC”) and basic concepts and terminology of Chinese law. Although not designed as a comprehensive survey, the class will cover a list of topics, the general knowledge of which may serve as good basis for the students’ further studies in Chinese law. Students interested in China-related law practice/working opportunities in the Greater China region may also find the class useful as it aims to improve the students’ language and communication skills in legal settings. Both classroom instruction and reading material are expected to be in Chinese. English interpretation will be provided from time to time as the instructor may determine necessary during the course of instruction. Other adjustments to course material are also possible based on the enrolled students’ general proficiency in Chinese. The instructor encourages interested students to discuss expected language proficiency in advance. Students will be graded based on three short writing assignments in Chinese (500 Chinese characters or more).
    Autumn 2013
    Xin Dai
  • Civil Procedure I

    LAWS 30211 - 01 (3) 1L
    Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
    Autumn 2013
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Civil Procedure I

    LAWS 30211 - 02 (3) 1L
    Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
    Autumn 2013
    Emily Buss
  • Civil Procedure II

    LAWS 30221 - 01 (3) 1L
    Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject-matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
    Spring 2014
    Alison LaCroix
  • Civil Procedure II

    LAWS 30221 - 02 (3) 1L
    Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
    Spring 2014
    Diane P. Wood
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Winter 2014
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Autumn 2013
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Spring 2014
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Class Action Controversies

    LAWS 93602 - 01 (2 to 3) m, w, x
    This seminar will address the legal principles that govern class action litigation in federal and state courts. The seminar will discuss the requirements of Rule 23, current issues and recent court decisions, legislative modifications to class action practice, constitutional principles applicable to class actions, and the legal, practical, and ethical issues that arise in class actions. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and their final option. Students have the option of submitting a seminar paper or taking an examination at the conclusion of the quarter. Students wishing to receive a third credit will need to submit additional written work.
    Winter 2014
    Michael Brody
  • Closing A Deal: The Structuring and Documentation of a Secured Loan Transaction

    LAWS 71403 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar will cover the structuring, documentation and closing of a secured loan transaction from the perspective of the secured lender. As counsel for the secured lender we will first consider the best structure for the proposed loans and how both the organization and working capital needs of the borrowers and the underwriting and regulatory constraints of the secured lender influence this structure. We will next assess commitment documentation and syndication. The majority of our time will then be spent analyzing transaction documentation, progressing from the organization of the closing checklist to the negotiation of the credit agreement and finally to the perfection of liens. In this seminar we will discuss not only why transactions and documentation are structured the way they are and the meanings of standard credit document provisions, but also the practical implications for any commercial finance associate living through the transaction.
    Autumn 2013
    Erin Casey
  • Collective Bargaining in Sports and Entertainment

    LAWS 63903 - 01 (2 to 3) m, x
    This seminar examines collective bargaining in the contexts of professional sports and entertainment. The Sherman Act and Clayton Act are studied in light of antitrust exemptions that apply to monopolistic employment arrangements such as the reserve system (its opposite is called free agency), the draft and exclusive rights for a player, eligibility restrictions for star amateurs, and other anticompetitive practices in music, theater, movie, TV, and sports settings. The seminar explores how unions have evolved as potent employee responses to highly restrictive employment practices. Readings examine powerful weapons under the National Labor Relations Act that unions may use to counteract employer cartels in theater, movies, baseball, football, basketball, hockey, and related industries. These weapons include full and partial and intermittent strikes, as well as strike threats. The seminar examines how these bargaining tactics enable rank-and-file employees, and star performers, to share in the wealth that they generate in combination with capital investments made by employers. The seminar emphasizes writing. Students are assigned weekly question sets, and are expected to submit a seminar paper based on the accumulation of these exercises. Weekly reading and submission of a short response paper before each class. There is one arbitration case, presented near the end of the course, that requires some time to prepare outside of class with a team of classmates (estimated group prep time is 3-6 hours, and can be handled in various online group-project formats-- or, with in-person meetings). During the arbitration phase, there is no weekly reading or pre-submit assignment. Students wishing to take the class for three credits must complete an additional short research paper (10-12 pages).
    Autumn 2013
    Michael LeRoy
  • Commercial Real Estate Finance

    LAWS 44002 - 01 (2) m, x
    This seminar will consider basic principles of commercial real estate lending, including financing structures, legal issues in lending (including the impact of bankruptcy), sources of debt capital and basic underwriting principles applied by institutional lenders. Having taken Commercial Real Estate Transactions (LAWS 44801) may be helpful, but is not a prerequisite. A student's grade will be determined by an in-class examination.
    Winter 2014
    James Rosenbloom
  • Commercial Transactions - Negotiation, Drafting, and Analysis

    LAWS 48604 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This simulation class provides intensive instruction in the negotiation, drafting, and analysis of complex commercial contracts. Students will develop the skills necessary to (i) translate a business deal into clear and concise contract terms, (ii) negotiate and draft various types of commercial contracts across multiple industries, and (iii) effectively and efficiently communicate complex commercial and contractual legal issues to clients. Grades will be based upon substantial weekly written exercises and productive class participation. This class will provide the student with opportunities to analyze and draft significant provisions across a range of different contracts (nondisclosure and confidentiality agreements, employment agreements, services agreement, and agreements for the sale of goods); and to participate in a simulated contract negotiation for the acquisition of an interest in a closely held limited liability company. The simulation will require not only in-class participation, but also negotiation sessions to be scheduled by teams of students (and possible team meetings) between class sessions. Students will develop the skills necessary to (i) translate a business deal into clear and concise contract terms, (ii) negotiate and draft various types of commercial contracts across multiple industries, and (iii) effectively and efficiently communicate complex commercial and contractual legal issues to clients.
    Spring 2014
    Seth McNary
  • Comparative Constitutional Design Seminar

    LAWS 50103 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    In this seminar, we will explore the considerations and challenges in designing a constitution. The first part of this seminar draws on leading legal, economic and political theories to explore the origins of constitutions: why do countries adopt written constitutions? And what explains their constitutional choices? The second part of the seminar explores different substantive constitutional design topics, or the different ways in which constitutions deal with rights, checks and balances, and the protection of ethnic minorities. The last part of the seminar addresses potential implications of constitutional design choices. We draw on interdisciplinary research to explore an important puzzle in constitutional design: why do governments comply with their constitutional commitments? And to what extent can smart constitutional design aid compliance? Every student has to select one country and become an expert on this country’s constitution over the course of the quarter. In the class discussions, students will have to apply various constitutional design theories to their country of expertise, and bring insights from this country into the discussion.
    Autumn 2013
    Mila Versteeg
  • Comparative Legal Institutions

    LAWS 50101 - 01 (3) r, w, x
    This course is designed to examine a range of legal institutions from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. It is not a traditional course in comparative law, in that it focuses not so much on particular rules of substantive law but on the structure of different legal systems and the consequences of those structural differences for law and society, especially for economic development. Readings will be drawn from legal and social science literature, including works from anthropology, economics, political science and sociology. The course will explicitly cover non-Western legal traditions to an extent not found in conventional comparative law courses. The course will conclude with reflections on what a comparative perspective tells us about American legal institutions. Course grades will be given on the basis of a take-home written exam, with a small component for class participation. There is a paper option.
    Winter 2014
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Complex Financial Institutions -- too big to fail?; too big to manage? / Lessons from the Financial Crisis and Current Regulatory Debate

    LAWS 94813