Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (30%) and work at LAF (70%).
    Winter 2016
    Lawrence Wood
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (30%) and work at LAF (70%).
    Spring 2016
    Lawrence Wood
  • Poverty Law

    LAWS 57402 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, w, x
    In Poverty Law, we will explore the role that lawyers can play in challenging the distribution of wealth in American society. We will focus primarily on the patchwork of government programs we call the “safety net”—such as programs providing cash (welfare), food assistance, and Medicaid. We will deepen our understanding, as lawyers and as citizens, of how such programs, a frequent source of discussion in current media, function in reality. In the process, we will enjoy many opportunities to explore whether and how program structures reflect or reinforce prevailing cultural attitudes and assumptions about program participants—including attitudes and assumptions based on gender and race. We will also debate, from practical, political, legal and ethical perspectives, what government can or should do, when administering safety net programs, to address what policy makers identify as behavioral causes of American poverty.
    Spring 2016
    Miriam Hallbauer
  • Power, Status, and Negotiation

    LAWS 46703 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This class introduces participants to social exchange theory and its application to negotiations. We first work to understand how structures of networks and resource dependence influence outcomes of negotiated and reciprocal exchange. To do this, we study four components of social exchange theory: resources, power, brokerage, and status. We evaluate questions like, when are actors more likely to resort to coercive power? When are they more likely to resort to reward power? Which is more effective? How does status impact power and exchange outcomes? We then study how negotiation processes may be informed by structure in influencing outcomes of exchange. Here we evaluate when and how actors influence outcomes in their negotiations using information about network structures and resource dependence models. We spend some time understanding process based research from negotiation theory, psychology, and social psychology, and work towards integrating our understanding of structure, process, and outcomes of exchange. Students participate in five negotiation exercises in and out of class, and complete written assignments based on these exercises and the reading materials.
    Winter 2016
    Zev Eigen
  • Pre-Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67403 - 01 (2) +, l, s, u, x
    This class focuses on fundamental pretrial litigation strategies and skills, including creation and evaluation of legal and factual theories, motion practice, interviewing clients, discovery planning, depositions, and pretrial preparation. The class employs a variety of learning methodologies, including lectures, small group discussions, simulated exercises, and oral arguments. Students taking Pre-Trial Advocacy are also eligible to enroll in the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Because of the overlap in topics, students are ineligible for Pre-Trial Advocacy if they have taken or are currently enrolled in any of the following litigation clinics: Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic; Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability; Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Complex Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Exoneration Project Clinic; Employment Discrimination Clinic; Abrams Environmental Law Clinic; and Federal Criminal Justice Clinic. The student's grade is based on class participation and written work product. Evidence is a prerequisite (may be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2016
    Erin Kelly
  • Private Equity in Asia

    LAWS 71407 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    Private equity is expanding rapidly into new regions around the world. Asia, where profound economic change is taking place in countries such as China, India, Indonesia, and Viet Nam, offers attractive opportunities for Western firms seeking to apply their proven investment models. Leading global firms like Carlyle, KKR, and Bain Capital are bullish on Asia and expect their Asian operations to excel in both rate of growth and rate of return – and eventually rival their U.S. and European operations. Such expansion is not without risk, however, and success in Asia requires private equity firms to develop new skills such as partnering with state-owned enterprises, accepting minority investment stakes, dealing with ambiguous legal frameworks, fending off fraud and corruption, and correcting weak corporate governance. Additionally, competition from indigenous firms is threatening to change the landscape - domestic funds are sprouting up in large numbers and increasingly attracting many of the best deals. This seminar will address current developments in private equity across major countries in Asia. We will examine the rise of the industry in the region, the role of private equity in economic development, and the nature of recent Asian private equity deals. Using case examples, we will evaluate deal opportunities and simulate investment decisions in eight different countries. Grading will be determined by class participation during the discussion of cases and readings – and by performance across three short papers. The first paper will examine private equity in the macro-context of economic transformation; the second will focus on the evaluation of a recent deal; and the third will address the terms in a prospective deal negotiation.
    Autumn 2015
    Tom Manning
  • Private Equity Transactions: Issues and Documentation

    LAWS 71402 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar will examine from a practical perspective the issues and documentation arising in a typical private equity acquisition transaction. The seminar will follow this type of transaction through its various stages and provide students in-depth and practical experience with common deal issues and drafting contractual provisions to address those issues. The goal of the seminar is to help prepare students for the practical aspects of being a deal lawyer. Course work will include reading acquisition contracts, cases and legal commentators and weekly written assignments (contract drafting and issue analysis). Grades will be based on class participation and the written assignments. Corporations and Contracts are prerequisites.
    Winter 2016
    Mark Fennell, Stephen Ritchie
  • Privatization in Criminal Law

    LAWS 99005 - 01 (2) m, x
    A fundamental policy choice in criminal law is the degree to which enforcement institutions are made public or private. This seminar will examine the historic creation of public institutions of criminal investigation, prosecution, and punishment, including the move away from using bounties and rewards to motivate enforcement agents, and recent trends back towards privatization. We will discuss whether such changes are desirable or undesirable, how best to motivate individuals actors in criminal enforcement, the problem of private lobbying against criminal justice reform, and what might be the optimal mix of private and public institutions. Reading topics will include private police, private prosecution, bail bondsmen and bounty hunters, private probation services, shaming sanctions, and private prisons. Students will write a series of reaction memos. The grade will be based on class participation and the memos.
    Spring 2016
    Richard H. McAdams
  • Professional Responsibility

    LAWS 41016 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course will focus on the rules governing the legal profession and practical applications of the rules. Course materials will include the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and a textbook; we may also read supplemental materials from time to time. Grades will be based on an in-class final exam and a class participation component. This course will fulfill the professional responsibility requirement.
    Winter 2016
    Martha Pacold
  • Project and Infrastructure Development and Finance

    LAWS 42512 - 01 (3) +, l, m, w, x
    This seminar is focused on the development and project financing of infrastructure facilities. These transactions feature a wide variety of commercial agreements and financial instruments, legal and financial structuring, and a significant role for lawyers. Public private partnership structures will be examined. Representative transactions, principally in the energy, transportation and public infrastructure sectors, will be selected for analysis and discussion. Infrastructure projects such as these provide a convenient vehicle for discussion of contractual provisions, structuring parameters, financial analysis, and legal practice issues common to a broad range of business and financial transactions. The classes will be discussion oriented; grades will be based on 3-4 short papers, an analytical paper of 10- 13 pages based on a case study and class participation. There are no pre-requisites, although basic corporation law is recommended. The readings will be taken from textbooks, professional journals, and actual commercial and financial contracts. A speaker from the financial community with a wide range of experience is expected. WP requirements may be satisfied with an additional research paper. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.
    Autumn 2015
    Martin Jacobson
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, and conveyancing. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the conclusion of the Spring quarter.
    Winter 2016
    R. H. Helmholz
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, and conveyancing. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the conclusion of the Spring quarter.
    Spring 2016
    R. H. Helmholz
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, intellectual property, and takings . The student's grade is based on an in-class examination.
    Winter 2016
    Lior Strahilevitz
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, and conveyancing. The student's grade is based on a single final examination. Participation may be taken into account as indicated in the syllabus.
    Spring 2016
    Lee Fennell
  • Prosecution and Defense Clinic

    LAWS 67713 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    The Prosecution and Defense Clinic provides students with an opportunity to learn about the criminal justice system through: (1) a 2-quarter seminar taught by a former Assistant United States Attorney and a former Federal Defender; and, (2) a clinical placement in either a prosecutor’s office or public defender’s office. The course will familiarize students with the legal procedures and issues which arise in a typical criminal case as well as ethical and other social justice issues encountered by all criminal justice attorneys and courts. The clinic provides students with a unique combination of substantive criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial practice, and hands-on experience through a clinical placement. Each student in the clinic will be responsible for securing a field placement and participating in a pre-screened externship program with a federal or state prosecutor or defender office for the winter and spring quarters. Examples include the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois or the Public Defender’s office in any northern Illinois county. Students will comply with the clinical placement’s requirements regarding hours and assignments, and may be expected to research substantive criminal law issues, draft affirmative and responsive pleadings and memos, interview witnesses and clients, assist lawyers with court hearings and where permitted (and with an appropriate 711 license), appear in court under the supervision of practicing attorneys. Other components of each student’s grade are: seminar classroom participation; trial practice exercises; journal entries; and, a 10-page practice paper or research paper. There is no final exam (in either quarter) and students will earn up to seven credits for the course, depending on the placement. Because of the practical component, the class size will be limited to twelve 2L or 3L students, and requires at least ten students to proceed.
    Winter 2016
    Lisa Noller
  • Prosecution and Defense Clinic

    LAWS 67713 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    The Prosecution and Defense Clinic provides students with an opportunity to learn about the criminal justice system through: (1) a 2-quarter seminar taught by a former Assistant United States Attorney and a former Federal Defender; and, (2) a clinical placement in either a prosecutor’s office or public defender’s office. The course will familiarize students with the legal procedures and issues which arise in a typical criminal case as well as ethical and other social justice issues encountered by all criminal justice attorneys and courts. The clinic provides students with a unique combination of substantive criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial practice, and hands-on experience through a clinical placement. Each student in the clinic will be responsible for securing a field placement and participating in a pre-screened externship program with a federal or state prosecutor or defender office for the winter and spring quarters. Examples include the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois or the Public Defender’s office in any northern Illinois county. Students will comply with the clinical placement’s requirements regarding hours and assignments, and may be expected to research substantive criminal law issues, draft affirmative and responsive pleadings and memos, interview witnesses and clients, assist lawyers with court hearings and where permitted (and with an appropriate 711 license), appear in court under the supervision of practicing attorneys. Other components of each student’s grade are: seminar classroom participation; trial practice exercises; journal entries; and, a 10-page practice paper or research paper. There is no final exam (in either quarter) and students will earn up to seven credits for the course, depending on the placement. Because of the practical component, the class size will be limited to twelve 2L or 3L students, and requires at least ten students to proceed.
    Spring 2016
    Lisa Noller
  • Public Choice

    LAWS 69001 - 01 (3) x
    This course focuses on the relationship between modern perspectives on voting and interest groups on the one hand and legislation and judicial interventions on the other. Public choice is essentially the science of collective decision-making, and it comes with several well developed tools of analysis. With these tools, and that perspective, we revisit the interactions between legislatures and judges, democracy's attempt to solve certain problems, and the roles played by a variety of legal doctrines and constitutional institutions (from takings law to line-item vetoes and to the meaning of precedents). As the course proceeds, we explore specific topics in law, such as the possibility of judicial vote-trading, the role of referenda in some jurisdictions but not others, and the role of precedent itself. Grades will be based on a final examination.
    Winter 2016
    Saul Levmore
  • Public Corruption and the Law

    LAWS 68314 - 01 (2 to 3) +, l, m, w, x
    This seminar will focus on how governments use the law to prevent and catch public corruption, how the law is sometimes used to protect public corruption, and how one should determine the optimal response to corruption and its consequences. We will examine the substantive criminal laws and sentencing schemes used in the best public corruption prosecutions, ranging from RICO and "honest services" fraud to bribery and extortion laws. We will also examine the laws that create, authorize, or prevent the most effective investigative tools used by law enforcement against public corruption, including wiretap laws and related privacy issues. We will study several key topics within public corruption law, including patronage, its effect on democratic institutions, and its status under the First Amendment; campaign finance reform and whether money in campaigns is protected speech or a corrupting influence (or both); and the relationship between transparency, online access to information, and corruption. We will also consider an economic analysis of public corruption, including questions about whether the level of democracy, and the pervasiveness of corruption in the culture, affect the cost-benefit analysis. Constitutional Law I and II are recommended pre-requisites. Students taking the class for 3 credits write one short reaction paper (or short research paper if appropriate), and one major paper. Those taking it for 2 credits write several short reaction papers.
    Spring 2016
    David Hoffman
  • Public International Law

    LAWS 72901 - 01 (3)
    Public international law mainly focuses on the legal rules created by states to regulate their interactions in international politics. This course explores the formation, application, and enforcement of public international law in world without a centralized executive, legislature or judiciary. The general relationship between international law and international politics will be discussed along with a focus on the interaction between American law and international law. We will begin with the building blocks of the international system—sources of international law, the role of states as actors in international politics, and the relationship between domestic and international law—and move to an evaluation of substantive legal rules in areas such as human rights, the use of force, and international criminal law. Current events will be discussed, where appropriate, to provide additional background to the course.
    Winter 2016
    Daniel Abebe
  • Public Morality and Legal Conservatism

    LAWS 78605 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    This seminar will study the philosophical background of contemporary legal arguments alluding to the idea of "public morality," in thinkers including Edmund Burke, James Fitzjames Stephen, and Patrick Devlin, and the criticisms of such arguments in thinkers including Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, and Herbert Hart. We will then study legal arguments on a range of topics, including drugs and alcohol, gambling, nudity, pornography and obscenity, non-standard sex, and marriage. Non-law students are welcome but need permission of the instructors, since space is limited. We are aiming for a total enrollment of 30, of which up to 10 can be non-law students (no undergraduates), and the rest will be law students, selected by lottery. Non-law students should apply to both professors by December 1, 2015, describing relevant background, especially in philosophy.
    Winter 2016
    Martha Nussbaum, William Baude