Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 05 (2) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Autumn 2015
    Nadia Nasser-Ghodsi
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 05 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2016
    Nadia Nasser-Ghodsi
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 05 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2016
    Nadia Nasser-Ghodsi
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (2) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Autumn 2015
    Michael Pollack
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2016
    Michael Pollack
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2016
    Michael Pollack
  • Legal Transactions--Retail Sector

    LAWS 91592 - 01 (3) m, s, x
    This seminar addresses the principal legal issues and commercial challenges facing the retail sector. Particular attention will be paid to luxury retailer relations with vendors and other third-party business associates, customers, and investors, the effect of a troubled economy on these relations, and the challenges and opportunities brought about by technology, social media, and e-commerce. Students will develop an understanding of key licensing, IP (including counterfeit goods), antitrust, corporate governance, and professional responsibility legal issues and practice pitfalls. The instructors will emphasize the practical interplay and tension between commercial realities and legal requirements, and strive to demonstrate the increasing professional burdens and responsibilities to which “in-house” counsel are subject. At times, the instructors will use a case-study format to emphasize identification and resolution of contract, IP, antitrust, corporate governance, and other issues and risks experienced by luxury retailers. The instructors also will use actual contracts, retailer policies and practices, litigation and internal-investigation documents. Senior managers from the luxury retailing industry will join several of the class sessions. Tony Bangs, formerly, Senior Vice President and General Counsel of the Neiman Marcus Group, will teach this seminar with Professor Zarfes, whose in-house experience was gained as Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Cap Gemini Ernst & Young, and Nate Lutz, Assistant General Counsel at Meijer, a major food retailer. Grades will be based upon quality of class participation, including participation in negotiation exercises (50 percent), and performance of a group project to be undertaken outside of class and presented in class during weeks seven and eight (50 percent). The instructors will emphasize quality of oral and written expression and legal analysis.
    Spring 2016
    Tony Bangs, David Zarfes, Nate Lutz
  • Legislation and Statutory Interpretation

    LAWS 44201 - 01 (3) e, x
    Much legal work today involves the close reading and interpretation of statutes or similar texts. This class considers current theories and problems related to the production and interpretation of statutes. The class encompasses political theory and public choice approaches to the legislative process as they relate to legal interpretation. It aims to bolster students' ability to work with statutes in law school and beyond. At the end of the class, students will have a thorough grasp of the production of statutes by the legislative branch and their use by the courts. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
    Spring 2016
    Aziz Huq
  • Life (and Death) in the Law

    LAWS 99403 - 01 (2) m, x
    This seminar will explore the various definitions and valuations of life across diverse areas of the law. Readings will include seminal cases in reproductive rights, assisted suicide, right-to-die, and capital punishment. Background readings in related areas, i.e., scientific journals, papers, etc. will also be required. The seminar will discuss policy decision-making including actuarial analysis and social, medical and religious values inherent, implicit or ignored in the legal analysis. Students will be required to write two response papers, co-draft a statute in one area of law, and participate in jury deliberations. Grade will also be based on class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Herschella G. Conyers
  • Litigating Financial Disputes

    LAWS 52523 - 01 (3) m, r, s, w, x
    This seminar will explore the practice, theory, and strategy of litigating financial disputes. These disputes include bankruptcy proceedings, shareholder derivative suits, securities fraud cases, white collar investigations, and suits alleging the breach of financial contracts. On the practical side, the seminar will explore the procedures for choosing and preparing financial experts to testify on valuation and other issues, interviewing and deposing executive officers and investment bankers, and common discovery issues that arise. On the theoretical side, we will explore critiques of the current systems of litigating these disputes and proposals for reform. In all areas, we will consider the strategic implications that lawyers must take into account both in litigating the disputes and in negotiating agreements in ways to avoid future disputes or reduce the risk of losing a dispute if one arises. In general, we will explore the overlap between litigation and transactional work that is at the heart of these disputes. For example, we will look at cases where litigation positions are used to facilitate leverage in transactions. The seminar's materials will be a mix of court opinions, pleadings filed in actual cases, transactional documents, and academic articles.
    Autumn 2015
    Anthony Casey
  • Litigation Laboratory

    LAWS 91563 - 01 (3) l, s, u, w, x
    This class brings lawyers and students together to analyze and develop aspects of the lawyers’ ongoing cases. It allows good lawyers to use law students for collaborative help with open cases, and allows law students to learn litigation skills by working with the lawyers. A different lawyer with a different case will participate in most class sessions. Typically the lawyer will provide materials for the students to review before the class. During the class, students will discuss, argue, debate, and work with the lawyer to solve hard issues. Following each class, students will complete written materials analyzing and evaluating the problem. In classes when lawyers are not included, students also learn practical litigation skills through various advocacy exercises. Students will be graded based on active participation and their written materials.
    Winter 2016
    Catherine Masters, James A. Clark
  • Local Government Law

    LAWS 71701 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the law regarding the provision of public goods and services at the state and local level. It explores the way in which local government law addresses the issues of what services a local government should provide, which residents should receive those services, who pays for the services provided, and how these decisions are reached. In the process, it explores the relationship among federal, state, and local governments, with particular emphasis on judicial analysis of the constitutional and statutory basis of those relationships. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Autumn 2015
    Julie Roin
  • Managing Legal Risk in a Global Economy

    LAWS 73913 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, x
    In today's global economy, companies, investors and other economic actors are operating on a cross-border basis more than ever before. As a result, they are faced with the daunting prospect of managing legal, regulatory and other business risks in a multitude of countries across the globe. This seminar will introduce students to the intriguing challenges of managing cross-border legal, regulatory and other risks in today's global and increasingly complex and interconnected economy. The seminar will cover an array of substantive issues including, among other things, anti-corruption, regulation, economic sanctions, managing cross-border liability risks, tools for the effective resolution of cross-border litigation, including the use of bilateral investment treaties, and the management of political and country risks. The Seminar also will explore the various dimensions of the General Counsel role in today's multinational enterprises, as well as the important relationship between counsel (in-house and external) and company management in effectively managing risk on a global basis. The seminar will be taught on the basis of readings as well as case studies. The format of the seminar will depend heavily upon active student participation. Law students and business students are both encouraged to participate in the seminar. Students will be graded based upon the quality of their preparation for and active participation in the seminar, as well as the quality of a take home final exam, which involve the preparation of a research paper requiring students to analyze and address a specific fact pattern drawing on the various concepts and issues that will be discussed during the seminar. This seminar will satisfy part of the lesser of the school’s two writing requirements, if substantial research and written work is completed.
    Spring 2016
    Javier Rubinstein
  • Marketing Strategy

    LAWS 91525 - 01 (3) x
    The objectives of the course are to introduce you to the substantive and procedural aspects of marketing management and to sharpen your skills for critical analytical thinking and effective communication. My goals are: 1. To introduce you to marketing strategy and to the elements of marketing analysis: customer analysis, competitor analysis, and company analysis. 2. To familiarize you with the elements of the marketing mix (product strategy, pricing, advertising and promotion, and distribution), and to enhance your problem solving and decision-making abilities in these operational areas of marketing. 3. To provide you with a forum (both written and oral) for presenting and defending your own recommendations and for critically examining and discussing the recommendations of others. Effective marketing management results not from simply internalizing marketing facts and institutional detail, but from systematic critical thinking and the reasoned application of several general, underlying principles. “Whatever be the detail with which you cram your student, the chance of his meeting in after-life exactly that detail is almost infinitesimal; and if he does meet it, he will probably have forgotten what you taught him about it. The really useful training yields a comprehension of a few general principles with a thorough grounding in the way they apply to a variety of concrete details. In subsequent practice the (students) will have forgotten your particular details; but they will remember by an unconscious common sense how to apply principles to immediate circumstances.” Alfred Whitehead, The Aims of Education and other Essays.
    Autumn 2015
    Sanjay K. Dhar
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters. For additional information concerning the Autumn 2015 Combatant Clemency Project, please follow this link: http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/mandel/mental.
    Autumn 2015
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Winter 2016
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Spring 2016
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mergers and Acquisitions

    LAWS 42311 - 01 (3) x
    In this course we will examine a number of the important legal and practical issues that arise in connection with mergers and acquisitions of U.S. businesses. These include: (1) the differences between mergers and tender offers, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type of transaction; (2) the duties of directors in change of control transactions; (3) special considerations applicable to transactions, such as controlling shareholder buyouts or management buyouts, in which a director, officer or shareholder has a material conflict of interest; (4) disclosure issues in public M&A transactions; (5) issues that arise in connection with hostile takeovers and takeover defenses; (6) the enforceability of deal protection provisions in public merger agreements; (7) issues that arise in connection with merger, stock purchase, and asset purchase agreements; (8) issues relating to fraud claims brought in M&A transactions; (9) problems that may arise between signing an M&A agreement and the closing or termination of the transaction; and (10) issues that arise in connection with preliminary agreements. The course materials will include relevant judicial decisions as well as examples of disclosure documents and merger, stock purchase and asset purchase agreements. Grades will depend on a final exam and class participation. Some of the topics in this course will also be covered in Buyouts, but that course is not a prerequisite for this course and students may take both courses.
    Winter 2016
    Scott Davis
  • Modern Professional Responsibility

    LAWS 41018 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course satisfies the professional responsibility requirement. It will explore a variety of legal, ethical and real-world issues commonly faced by modern lawyers in their daily practices. It will address the relationship among the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility, the Restatement of Law Governing Lawyers and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. It will also focus on several noteworthy legal malpractice and securities claims in which lawyers and major law firms were involved. Course materials will include traditional texts and statutory materials, hypotheticals drawn from unreported matters, as well as the results of mock trials and jury focus groups in which the conduct of lawyers was at issue.
    Autumn 2015
    Mark Nozette
  • Moot Court Boot Camp

    LAWS 99912 - 01 (1) s, u, x
    Moot Court Boot Camp has two components: oral advocacy and writing. The oral argument component will cover the basics of appellate oral argument. Students will receive two different cases and prepare and submit argument outlines in advance. During the workshop, students will gain hands-on experience by conducting multiple oral arguments before a variety of alumni and other practicing attorneys, judges, and faculty. The writing component will cover the basics of appellate brief writing. Students will use tight, persuasive writing to bolster arguments. We will focus on strong issue statements, effective headings, and powerful conclusions. We'll also explore sentence structure and word choice. Students will learn to define themes in their writing and carry them into the oral argument. Focused writing, we will learn, promotes successful oral advocacy. This class, which will meet for the weekend of October 17-18, is an optional supplement to the Hinton Moot Court Competition. The Saturday oral advocacy portion will be held at the offices of Jenner & Block (353 N. Clark Street, Chicago) and the Sunday portion on written advocacy will be held at the Law School. Credit will be granted upon completion of two judged arguments as part of the Hinton Moot Court Competition. Students who register for this class and fail to participate in the Hinton Moot Court Competition will be withdrawn from this class with a grade of W. Students will prepare a short, written assignment that we will discuss and revise during class. There are no prerequisites. Students may only receive credit for this class once during their Law School career. J.D. students only. Does not count towards the yearly seminars/simulation classes limit. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Elizabeth Duquette, Amy M. Gardner