Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Litigating Financial Disputes

    LAWS 52523 - 01 (3) m, r, s, w, x
    This seminar will explore the practice, theory, and strategy of litigating financial disputes. These disputes include bankruptcy proceedings, shareholder derivative suits, securities fraud cases, white collar investigations, and suits alleging the breach of financial contracts. On the practical side, the seminar will explore the procedures for choosing and preparing financial experts to testify on valuation and other issues, interviewing and deposing executive officers and investment bankers, and common discovery issues that arise. On the theoretical side, we will explore critiques of the current systems of litigating these disputes and proposals for reform. In all areas, we will consider the strategic implications that lawyers must take into account both in litigating the disputes and in negotiating agreements in ways to avoid future disputes or reduce the risk of losing a dispute if one arises. In general, we will explore the overlap between litigation and transactional work that is at the heart of these disputes. For example, we will look at cases where litigation positions are used to facilitate leverage in transactions. The seminar materials will be a mix of court opinions, pleadings filed in actual cases, transactional documents, and academic articles. The grade is based on a series of short research papers or a final written paper.
    Spring 2015
    Anthony Casey
  • Litigation Laboratory

    LAWS 91563 - 01 (3) l, s, u, w, x
    This simulation class brings lawyers and students together to analyze and develop aspects of the lawyers’ ongoing cases. It allows good lawyers to use law students for collaborative help with open cases, and allows law students to learn litigation skills by working with the lawyers. A different lawyer with a different case will participate in most class sessions. Typically the lawyer will provide materials for the students to review before the class. During the class, students will discuss, argue, debate, and work with the lawyer to solve hard issues. Following each class, students will complete written materials analyzing and evaluating the problem. In classes when lawyers are not included, students also learn practical litigation skills through various advocacy exercises. Students will be graded based on active participation and their written materials.
    Winter 2015
    Catherine Masters, James A. Clark
  • Local Government Law

    LAWS 71701 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the law regarding the provision of public goods and services at the state and local level. It explores the way in which local government law addresses the issues of what services a local government should provide, which residents should receive those services, who pays for the services provided, and how these decisions are reached. In the process, it explores the relationship among federal, state, and local governments, with particular emphasis on judicial analysis of the constitutional and statutory basis of those relationships. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Spring 2015
    Julie Roin
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Autumn 2014
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Winter 2015
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Spring 2015
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mergers and Acquisitions

    LAWS 42311 - 01 (3) x
    In this course we will examine a number of the important legal and practical issues that arise in connection with mergers and acquisitions of U.S. businesses. These include: (1) the differences between mergers and tender offers, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type of transaction; (2) the duties of directors in change of control transactions; (3) special considerations applicable to transactions, such as controlling shareholder buyouts or management buyouts, in which a director, officer or shareholder has a material conflict of interest; (4) disclosure issues in public M&A transactions; (5) issues that arise in connection with hostile takeovers and takeover defenses; (6) the enforceability of deal protection provisions in public merger agreements; (7) issues that arise in connection with merger, stock purchase, and asset purchase agreements; (8) issues relating to fraud claims brought in M&A transactions; (9) problems that may arise between signing an M&A agreement and the closing or termination of the transaction; and (10) issues that arise in connection with preliminary agreements. The course materials will include relevant judicial decisions as well as examples of disclosure documents and merger, stock purchase and asset purchase agreements. Grades will depend on a final exam and class participation. Some of the topics in this course will also be covered in Buyouts, but that course is not a prerequisite for this course and students may take both courses.
    Winter 2015
    Scott Davis
  • Modern Professional Responsibility

    LAWS 41018 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course will explore a variety of legal, ethical and real-world issues commonly faced by modern lawyers in their daily practices. It will address the relationship among the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility, the Restatement (Third) of the Law Governing Lawyers, and various common law and statutory sources of the standards that govern the practice of law today. It will focus on several noteworthy professional liability cases involving lawyers and law firms. Course materials will include traditional texts and statutory materials, hypotheticals drawn from unreported matters, as well as the results of jury focus groups and at least one mediation. The course will meet two hours per week and will satisfy the professional liability requirement. The grade will be based on a combination of a proctored, in-class, two hour open-book examination, a short (10 to 12 pages) research paper, and class participation. Although a list of possible research topics will be provided, students will be encouraged to develop and write about their own research topics, subject to final approval by the instructor. Class attendance is required, with class discussion an integral part of the course and critical to a full understanding of the course materials. The class will be capped at 50.
    Autumn 2014
    Mark Nozette
  • National Security Issues and the Development of Legal Practice Skills

    LAWS 70703 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar will address current national security issues including presidential power, indefinite incarceration, assassination, electronic surveillance, and cyberwarfare. More than the typical seminar, this class will also focus on helping students develop a range of skills required for successful law practice. Students will form teams of 2-4 persons. Each team will present its analysis of a topic to the class and help facilitate class discussion of the topic. Each team will also submit a short memo on its selected topic. Constitutional Law I or the equivalent is recommended but not required (and can be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2015
    Robert A. Helman
  • Non-Profit Organizations

    LAWS 67802 - 01 (2) +, c/l, l, m, x
    The financial crisis and increase in political polarization that we have experienced has led to an increase in the role of non-profit organizations in our economy and democratic processes. However, few professionals understand how the rules applicable to non-profit organizations differ from comparable laws that govern the behavior of for-profit entities. This seminar attempts to fill that gap by exploring the tax and non-tax rules applicable to non-profit organizations. Such topics as fiduciary duties, commercial activities, federal and state tax exemptions, charitable deductions, and limits on lobbying and political activities are included. We dwell on the underlying question of why some activities (and not others) are carried out in the non-profit sector and the erosion of the difference between activities conducted by for-profit and non-profit entities. Think of hospitals; both for-profit and non-profit hospitals provide the same services to customers (patients). However, the tax and non-tax rules that apply to the two categories of hospitals are quite different. We examine these differences and consider whether they make sense. Prerequisite: Introductory Income Taxation (may be taken concurrently). The grade is based on a final take-home examination and class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    William C. Golden
  • Oil and Gas Law

    LAWS 45301 - 01 (3)
    The basic law relating to the exploration, production, and development of oil and gas. The following principal topics are covered: ownership interests in natural resources, leasing and field development, the classification and transfer of production interests, and regulation of field operation-pooling, unitization, and environmental controls. Taxation and post-production marketing controls are not covered. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final exam.
    Autumn 2014
    R. H. Helmholz
  • Partnership Taxation

    LAWS 44301 - 01 (3) +, s, x
    A review of the principals of partnership taxation, with an emphasis on the tax consequences of the formation, operation and dissolution of partnerships. Matters discussed include the treatment of leverage, capital accounts, disguised sales, mixing bowls, anti-abuse rules and other aspects of partnership taxation. Introductory Income Tax is a prerequisite. Meetings will be held at the offices of Baker & McKenzie, 300 E. Randolph, in the Loop. Dinner is provided. The grade is based on a final take-home examination.
    Spring 2015
    Richard Lipton, Todd Golub
  • Patent Law

    LAWS 78001 - 01 (3)
    This is a basic course in patent law, in which the class is introduced to the governing statutes, core concepts, and influential court decisions. No technical expertise is necessary whatsoever, and students from all backgrounds are encouraged to enroll. Patent cases often involve complicated technologies, but the key to understanding the relevant legal issue almost never turns on an understanding of the patented technology itself. Student grades are based on a take-home final examination. Students from all backgrounds -- technical or not -- are encouraged to enroll.
    Spring 2015
    Jonathan Masur
  • Philosophy of Criminal Law

    LAWS 99003 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the philosophical foundations of criminal law. We shall discuss notions of criminal responsibility, the justifiability of criminal sanctions, the role of the state in punishing, the privatization of punishment and prisons, the concept of compassion and its relevance to criminal law. The grade is based on a final take-home examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Alon Harel
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (30%) and work at LAF (70%).
    Winter 2015
    Lawrence Wood
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (30%) and work at LAF (70%).
    Spring 2015
    Lawrence Wood
  • Pre-Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67403 - 01 (2) +, l, s, u, x
    This class focuses on fundamental pretrial litigation strategies and skills, including creation and evaluation of legal and factual theories, motion practice, interviewing clients, discovery planning, depositions, and pretrial preparation. The class employs a variety of learning methodologies, including lectures, small group discussions, simulated exercises, and oral arguments. Students taking Pre-Trial Advocacy are also eligible to enroll in the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Because of the overlap in topics, students are ineligible for Pre-Trial Advocacy if they have taken or are currently enrolled in any of the following litigation clinics: Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic; Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability; Mental Health Advocacy Clinic; Exoneration Project Clinic; Employment Discrimination Clinic; Abrams Environmental Law Clinic; and Federal Criminal Justice Clinic. The student's grade is based on class participation and written work product. Evidence is a prerequisite (may be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2015
    Erin Kelly
  • Privacy

    LAWS 79501 - 01 (3) x
    This course surveys America’s efforts to draw boundaries between the public and private spheres. The course primarily deals with three types of law: the privacy-related torts, constitutional privacy law, and various federal statutes and regulations that govern the collection, aggregation, and dissemination of private information. Substantive topics of discussion may include Internet privacy; health care and genetic privacy; sexual privacy; the relationship between privacy and the First Amendment; the Fourth Amendment and other restrictions on governmental investigations and surveillance; and European privacy law. The student’s grade is based on an in-class final examination and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Lior Strahilevitz
  • Private Equity Transactions: Issues and Documentation

    LAWS 71402 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar will examine from a practical perspective the issues and documentation arising in a typical private equity acquisition transaction. The seminar will follow this type of transaction through its various stages and provide students in-depth and practical experience with common deal issues and drafting contractual provisions to address those issues. The goal of the seminar is to help prepare students for the practical aspects of being a deal lawyer. Coursework will include reading acquisition contracts, cases and legal commentators and weekly written assignments (contract drafting and issue analysis). Grades will be based on class participation and the written assignments. Business Organizations and Contracts are prerequisites.
    Winter 2015
    Mark Fennell, Stephen Ritchie
  • Professional Responsibility

    LAWS 41016 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course will focus on the rules governing the legal profession and practical applications of the rules. Course materials will include the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and a textbook; we may also read supplemental materials from time to time. Grades will be based on an in-class final exam and a class participation component. This course will fulfill the professional responsibility require