Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    Primarily through litigation, students in the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic work to address climate change, water pollution and legacy contamination and to protect natural resources and human health. To date, the Clinic has focused on holding accountable natural resource extraction companies for actual or anticipated damage to the environment, as well as the government agencies that permit such activities. The Clinic has also recently become more involved in the development and implementation of rules and regulations regarding climate change, renewable energy, and energy efficiency, with an eye toward future litigation on these issues. Clinic students engage in a wide variety of activities to learn practical legal skills, from conducting factual investigations, to interviewing witnesses and preparing affidavits, to reviewing administrative determinations, to drafting motions, to conducting depositions, to working with experts, to arguing motions and to presenting at trial or an administrative hearing. The Clinic generally represents regional and national environmental organizations and works with co-counsel, thus exposing students to the staff of these organizations and other experienced environmental lawyers. The Clinic may also engage in legislative reform and rule-making efforts; students interested solely in that kind of work should notify the instructor before joining the clinic, if possible. Students interested in environmental transactional work should let the instructor know so that projects around this kind of work can be developed. While it helps for students to have taken or be taking one or more of Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Evidence, or Trial Advocacy, these courses are not pre-requisites or co-requisites. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have an environmental, science or engineering background; all are welcome.
    Autumn 2014
    Mark N. Templeton, Sean Helle
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    Primarily through litigation, students in the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic work to address climate change, water pollution and legacy contamination and to protect natural resources and human health. To date, the Clinic has focused on holding accountable natural resource extraction companies for actual or anticipated damage to the environment, as well as the government agencies that permit such activities. The Clinic has also recently become more involved in the development and implementation of rules and regulations regarding climate change, renewable energy, and energy efficiency, with an eye toward future litigation on these issues. Clinic students engage in a wide variety of activities to learn practical legal skills, from conducting factual investigations, to interviewing witnesses and preparing affidavits, to reviewing administrative determinations, to drafting motions, to conducting depositions, to working with experts, to arguing motions and to presenting at trial or an administrative hearing. The Clinic generally represents regional and national environmental organizations and works with co-counsel, thus exposing students to the staff of these organizations and other experienced environmental lawyers. The Clinic may also engage in legislative reform and rule-making efforts; students interested solely in that kind of work should notify the instructor before joining the clinic, if possible. Students interested in environmental transactional work should let the instructor know so that projects around this kind of work can be developed. While it helps for students to have taken or be taking one or more of Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Evidence, or Trial Advocacy, these courses are not pre-requisites or co-requisites. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have an environmental, science or engineering background; all are welcome.
    Winter 2015
    Mark N. Templeton, Sean Helle
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    Primarily through litigation, students in the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic work to address climate change, water pollution and legacy contamination and to protect natural resources and human health. To date, the Clinic has focused on holding accountable natural resource extraction companies for actual or anticipated damage to the environment, as well as the government agencies that permit such activities. The Clinic has also recently become more involved in the development and implementation of rules and regulations regarding climate change, renewable energy, and energy efficiency, with an eye toward future litigation on these issues. Clinic students engage in a wide variety of activities to learn practical legal skills, from conducting factual investigations, to interviewing witnesses and preparing affidavits, to reviewing administrative determinations, to drafting motions, to conducting depositions, to working with experts, to arguing motions and to presenting at trial or an administrative hearing. The Clinic generally represents regional and national environmental organizations and works with co-counsel, thus exposing students to the staff of these organizations and other experienced environmental lawyers. The Clinic may also engage in legislative reform and rule-making efforts; students interested solely in that kind of work should notify the instructor before joining the clinic, if possible. Students interested in environmental transactional work should let the instructor know so that projects around this kind of work can be developed. While it helps for students to have taken or be taking one or more of Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Evidence, or Trial Advocacy, these courses are not pre-requisites or co-requisites. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have an environmental, science or engineering background; all are welcome.
    Spring 2015
    Mark N. Templeton, Sean Helle
  • Accounting and Financial Analysis

    LAWS 79103 - 01 (3) +, s, x
    This course is designed to quickly introduce you to (or, preferably, refresh your knowledge of) basic financial accounting [first two weeks of class] and then aims to aggressively increase your ability to be a highly sophisticated user of financial statements. After taking this course, you should improve your ability to determine a firm's accounting policy for a particular type of transaction and to determine how that policy choice affects its primary financial statements. You will also learn how to question whether these effects fairly reflect the underlying economics of the firm's transactions. Asking these questions involves an interplay between accounting, economics, finance, law and business strategy. You should therefore greatly improve your ability to use an accounting report as part of an overall assessment of the firm's strategy and the potential rewards and risks of dealing with the firm. The teaching approach will be a roughly equal combination of lecture time and demanding case applications of the lecture material that will involve group case assignments that will form the basis for in-class discussion of the cases. The technical knowledge acquired from the lecture material is applied to cases where the main goal is to examine how the reported financial statements would differ if the firm had used different accounting policies. The focus is on modifying the reported financial statements in order to obtain the cleanest possible inputs for use in such applications as equity valuation, transaction structuring and credit analysis. The topics to be discussed are likely to include the accounting for, and interpretation of: revenue recognition, intercorporate investments, organizational structures (e.g., franchising), debt, and leases. Intensive group hand-in cases will be used to illustrate how the flexibility in financial reporting can reflect both the economics of the firm and the incentives of the managers creating the financial statements. It is strongly recommended that students registering for this course have some prior exposure to accounting course work, at least at the level of Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys (LAWS 79112) or Legal Elements of Accounting (LAWS 79102). Grading will be based on case assignments, short homework assignments, class participation, and a final exam.
    Spring 2015
    Philip G. Berger
  • Advanced Legal Research

    LAWS 79802 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students' knowledge of legal sources and to develop their ability to research the law. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including statutes, administrative law, legislative history, cases, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as corporate and securities, tax, transactional, federal procedure, and intellectual property, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper. The seminar will be limited to twenty-five students with priority to third year students. To receive credit for this seminar, students must complete research assignments (30 percent of grade), submit a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor (60 percent of grade), and attend and participate in class meetings (10 percent). Students may earn either 2 or 3 credits for this seminar depending upon the number of assignments completed and the length of their final paper. A 20-25 page paper will be required for the 3-credit option for this seminar, along with 4 research assignments. For the 2-credit option for this seminar, students will write a 10-15 page paper and complete 2 research assignments. Research assignments will count towards 30% of the final grade; the research paper 60%. Class participation counts for 10%. In the research paper, the student should extensively and comprehensively address sources for researching the topic, discuss successful and less useful techniques, and recommend research strategies.
    Autumn 2014
    Todd Ito
  • Advanced Legal Research

    LAWS 79802 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students’ knowledge of legal sources and to develop their ability to research the law. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including statutes, administrative law, legislative history, cases, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as corporate and securities, tax, transactional, federal procedure, and intellectual property, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper. The seminar will be limited to twenty-five students with priority to third year students. To receive credit for this seminar, students must complete research assignments (30 percent of grade), submit a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor (60 percent of grade), and attend and participate in course meetings (10 percent). Students may earn either 2 or 3 credits for this seminar depending upon the number of assignments completed and the length of their final paper (minimum 20 pages for 3 credits; 10 pages for 2 credits). In the research paper, the student should extensively and comprehensively address sources for researching the topic, discuss successful and less useful techniques, and recommend research strategies.
    Winter 2015
    Sheri H. Lewis
  • Advanced Legal Research: Foreign and International Law

    LAWS 79803 - 01 (2) c/l, m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students' knowledge of foreign, comparative, and international legal sources and to develop their global legal research skills. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including locating constitutions, legislation, treaties, cases, decisions of international tribunals, documents of international organizations such as the EU, UN, WIPO, and the WTO, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as comparative corporate law (focus on cross-border practice areas), comparative constitutional law, international intellectual property, international criminal law, international trade law, international environmental law, and international human rights, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. It will also highlight gaps in international legal research resources and techniques for bridging them. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using international legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper.
    Winter 2015
    Lyonette Louis-Jacques
  • Advanced Legal Writing

    LAWS 79901 - 01 (2) +, s, w, x
    This course will prepare law students for the working world by honing writing skills for briefs, memoranda, motions and contracts. We will discuss and practice the major principles of legal writing in plain English -- no jargon, no legalese, no anachronistic fluff. In addition to fine-tuning basic and more advanced writing skills, students will learn how to use their writing to win arguments, persuade clients and sharpen their own thinking. The class will function largely as a workshop where we analyze the impact of various writing styles. Regular attendance is essential. Through exercises and group critiques, students will learn to write more succinctly and effectively. Better writers make better lawyers. The course concludes with an eight-hour take-home examination, which determines the student's grade. Students must complete all assignments before the exam. This course satisfies the requirements of the Writing Project writing requirement. Legal Research and Writing is a pre-requisite. NB: The first meeting of this class will be 6:10-8:10 p.m. on Thursday, March 26. All other meetings will be on Tuesdays, 4:00-6:00 p.m. The class will not meet Tuesday, March 31.
    Spring 2015
    Elizabeth Duquette
  • Brief-writing and Appellate Advocacy Seminar

    LAWS 79905 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar will be devoted to the art of brief-writing and appellate advocacy. Topics will include how to select the best arguments, how to choose a theme and structure the facts and the argument, and how to write the brief in a way that it is clear, concise and persuasive on the first read. Grades will be based on two papers -- an opening brief and a reply.
    Spring 2015
    Michele Odorizzi
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Autumn 2014
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Winter 2015
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Spring 2015
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Collective Bargaining in Sports and Entertainment

    LAWS 63903 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar examines collective bargaining in the contexts of professional sports and entertainment. The Sherman Act and Clayton Act are studied in light of antitrust exemptions that apply to monopolistic employment arrangements such as the reserve system (its opposite is called free agency), the draft and exclusive rights for a player, eligibility restrictions for star amateurs, and other anticompetitive practices in music, theater, movie, TV, and sports settings. The seminar explores how unions have evolved as potent employee responses to highly restrictive employment practices. Seminar readings examine powerful weapons under the National Labor Relations Act that unions may use to counteract employer cartels in theater, movies, baseball, football, basketball, hockey, and related industries. These weapons include full and partial and intermittent strikes, as well as strike threats. The seminar examines how these bargaining tactics enable rank-and-file employees, and star performers, to share in the wealth that they generate in combination with capital investments made by employers. The seminar emphasizes writing. Students are assigned weekly question sets, and are expected to submit a course paper based on the accumulation of these exercises.
    Autumn 2014
    Michael LeRoy
  • Commercial Transactions - Negotiation, Drafting, and Analysis

    LAWS 48604 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This simulation class provides intensive instruction in the negotiation, drafting, and analysis of complex commercial contracts. Students will develop the skills necessary to (i) translate a business deal into clear and concise contract terms, (ii) negotiate and draft various types of commercial contracts across multiple industries, and (iii) effectively and efficiently communicate complex commercial and contractual legal issues to clients. Grades will be based upon substantial weekly written exercises and productive class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Seth McNary
  • Contract Drafting and Review

    LAWS 79912 - 01 (3) m, s, x
    This seminar will serve as an introduction to contracting drafting and how such drafting differs from other types of legal writing. We will start with the basic "anatomy of a contract," discussing the meaning, use and effect of various provisions. The seminar will address not only legal drafting issues, but also how to understand a client's practical business needs in order to effectively use the contract as a planning and problem solving tool. Students will draft and review specific contract provisions, and will learn how to read, review and analyze contracts with an eye toward both legal and business risk issues. Grades will be based upon class participation, a series of substantial out-of-class weekly drafting exercises, and a final take-home assignment.
    Autumn 2014
    Joan E. Neal
  • Contract Negotiation - Outsourcing

    LAWS 79913 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This class will provide students with the opportunity to participate in a simulated contract negotiation for the outsourcing of services. Students will be divided into "buyers" and "sellers" and then paired up to draft, review, revise, negotiate and finalize a contract with their opposing counsel partner(s) by the end of the quarter, with a focus on risk assessment and risk mitigation in the contract. Instructors will act as the clients for the two sides of the transaction, providing necessary business and legal guidance to their students/counsel over the course of the simulation. The simulation will require not only in-class participation, but also negotiation sessions to be scheduled by the teams between class meetings. The simulation may begin with a Request for Proposal ("RFP") and/or term sheet, and continue through the drafting and completion of an agreement. Grades will be based upon class participation (including the ability to work with others in a collaborative and effective manner) and the instructors' review of the final agreement(s) reached by the parties. Group work outside of class is required.
    Winter 2015
    David Zarfes, Joan E. Neal
  • Contracts and Commercial Transactions

    LAWS 91553 - 01 (2 to 3) s, x
    The objective of this course is to familiarize the student with contracts as used by sophisticated parties. Accordingly, this course will explore "real-world" contracts actually entered into by "real-world" companies—the Coca-Cola's, Microsoft's, and HP's of the world. Through this course, the student will attain a certain facility with agreements, their organization and structure, their language, and their provisions (and the interaction of these provisions). In addition to looking at contracts through the eyes of parties and practitioners, the course will pay considerable attention to how courts have treated various contractual provisions, exploring areas of substantive law—including, and in addition to, contract law—to the extent relevant. Readings will include comments from leading practicing attorneys (from law firms such as Sidley, Kirkland, and Cravath, and from legal departments at companies such as Microsoft, Accenture, and JPMorgan). The student's grade will be based on in-class participation as well as a mid-term exercise and a take-home final exam. The mid-term exercise will involve substantial time spent outside of class negotiating and drafting an agreement and writing a memorandum analyzing this agreement. The take-home final exam will require the student to apply the tools and concepts developed by reviewing and working with contracts throughout this course to an agreement not presented in class or the materials. The course will require substantial out of class work and class participation will count toward the grade. Students will be negotiating and drafting contracts outside of class. This course is highly recommended for those students interested in taking other transactional offerings at the Law School, including (but, of course, not limited to) the Corporate Lab: Transactional Clinic. A 2-CREDIT OPTION IS AVAILABLE WITH PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.
    Autumn 2014
    David Zarfes
  • Corporate Lab Transactional Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) +, a, s, x
    The Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients will include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, Blue Haven Initiative (a Pritzker family NGO), Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Honeywell, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Microsoft, Motorola, Nike, Northern Trust, Schreiber Foods, and Verizon Communications. Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students entering in or after Autumn Quarter 2014 are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only, and (iv) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. While not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking the Corporate Lab. Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. For additional information, see the Corporate Lab website at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/corporatelab.
    Autumn 2014
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Ellis A. Regenbogen, David Finkelstein
  • Corporate Lab Transactional Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) +, a, s
    The Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients will include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, Blue Haven Initiative (a Pritzker family NGO), Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Honeywell, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Microsoft, Motorola, Nike, Northern Trust, Schreiber Foods, and Verizon Communications. Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students entering in or after Autumn Quarter 2014 are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only, and (iv) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. While not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking the Corporate Lab. Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. For additional information, see the Corporate Lab website at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/corporatelab.
    Winter 2015
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Ellis A. Regenbogen, David Finkelstein
  • Corporate Lab Transactional Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) +, a, s
    The Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients will include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, Blue Haven Initiative (a Pritzker family NGO), Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Honeywell, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Microsoft, Motorola, Nike, Northern Trust, Schreiber Foods, and Verizon Communications. Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students entering in or after Autumn Quarter 2014 are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only, and (iv) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. While not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking the Corporate Lab. Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. For additional information, see the Corporate Lab website at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/corporatelab.
    Spring 2015
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Ellis A. Regenbogen, David Finkelstein