Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 2) a, s
    The Abrams Environmental Law Clinic attempts to solve some of the most pressing environmental problems in Chicago, the State of Illinois, and the Great Lakes region. There is no requirement for students to take any environmental law class or to have an environmental, science or engineering background before enrolling in the clinic; all are welcome. On behalf of organizational clients and affected persons, the Clinic challenges those who pollute illegally, holds government agencies accountable, advocates for changes to regulations and laws, and promotes innovative approaches for improving the environment. Students develop a number of core advocacy competencies, such as working with clients, spotting issues, conducting factual investigations, performing practical legal research, and advocating through written and oral communications. Students also learn about the range of strategic and tactical approaches used by effective advocates.
    Spring 2014
    Mark N. Templeton
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 2) a, s
    The Abrams Environmental Law clinic attempts to solve some of the most pressing environmental problems throughout Chicago, the State of Illinois, and the Great Lakes region. On behalf of clients, the clinic challenges those who pollute illegally, fights for stricter permits, advocates for changes to regulations and laws, holds environmental agencies accountable, and develops innovative approaches for improving the environment. Through clinic participation, students learn substantive environmental law and procedures for addressing concerns through the courts or administrative tribunals. Students develop a number of core advocacy competencies, such as counseling clients, spotting issues, conducting factual investigations, performing practical legal research, advocating through written and oral communications, planning cases, managing time, and addressing ethical issues and dilemmas. In addition, students develop an appreciation for the range of strategic and tactical approaches that effective advocates use. Some matters will be best resolved in front of a judge, others in an adversarial hearing, others through face-to-face meetings with government officials, and others by putting public pressure on a polluter or administrative agency. Any given matter may require the use of one or more of these approaches simultaneously or sequentially, although in general, the clinic will deploy adversarial approaches to help achieve its clients’ objectives.
    Autumn 2013
    Mark N. Templeton
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 2) a, s
    The Abrams Environmental Law Clinic attempts to solve some of the most pressing environmental problems in Chicago, the State of Illinois, and the Great Lakes region. There is no requirement for students to take any environmental law class or to have an environmental, science or engineering background before enrolling in the clinic; all are welcome. On behalf of organizational clients and affected persons, the Clinic challenges those who pollute illegally, holds government agencies accountable, advocates for changes to regulations and laws, and promotes innovative approaches for improving the environment. Students develop a number of core advocacy competencies, such as working with clients, spotting issues, conducting factual investigations, performing practical legal research, and advocating through written and oral communications. Students also learn about the range of strategic and tactical approaches used by effective advocates.
    Winter 2014
    Mark N. Templeton
  • Accounting and Financial Analysis

    LAWS 79103 - 01 (3) +, s, x
    This course is designed to quickly introduce you to (or, preferably, refresh your knowledge of) basic financial accounting [first two weeks of class] and then aims to aggressively increase your ability to be a highly sophisticated user of financial statements. After taking this course, you should improve your ability to determine a firm's accounting policy for a particular type of transaction and to determine how that policy choice affects its primary financial statements. You will also learn how to question whether these effects fairly reflect the underlying economics of the firm's transactions. Asking these questions involves an interplay between accounting, economics, finance, law and business strategy. You should therefore greatly improve your ability to use an accounting report as part of an overall assessment of the firm's strategy and the potential rewards and risks of dealing with the firm. The teaching approach will be a roughly equal combination of lecture time and demanding case applications of the lecture material that will involve group case assignments that will form the basis for in-class discussion of the cases. The technical knowledge acquired from the lecture material is applied to cases where the main goal is to examine how the reported financial statements would differ if the firm had used different accounting policies. The focus is on modifying the reported financial statements in order to obtain the cleanest possible inputs for use in such applications as equity valuation, transaction structuring and credit analysis. The topics to be discussed are likely to include the accounting for, and interpretation of: revenue recognition, intercorporate investments, organizational structures (e.g., franchising), debt, and leases. Intensive group hand-in cases will be used to illustrate how the flexibility in financial reporting can reflect both the economics of the firm and the incentives of the managers creating the financial statements. It is strongly recommended that students registering for this course have some prior exposure to accounting course work, at least at the level of Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys (LAWS 79112) or Legal Elements of Accounting (LAWS 79102). Grading will be based on case assignments, short homework assignments, class participation, and a final exam.
    Spring 2014
    Philip G. Berger
  • Accounting for Lawyers

    LAWS 79201 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    The seminar is presented from the perspective of a practicing lawyer who must apply an understanding of accounting principles to provide relevant and accurate legal advice. While the seminar covers the fundamentals of accounting, it concentrates on their application in typical legal practice settings such as contracts, mergers and acquisitions, shareholder reporting, regulatory reporting, bankruptcy and litigation.
    Winter 2014
    David Bowers
  • Advanced Contract Drafting: General Corporate Agreements

    LAWS 79918 - 01 (2) +, m, s, x
    This seminar builds upon introductory contract drafting coursework and provides intensive instruction in the drafting and review of some of the most central types of contracts in general corporate legal practice. As such, it aims to develop students’ drafting skills and to prepare them to excel at all levels in law firms’ various corporate groups. We will begin the seminar by reviewing the different kinds of provisions that appear in any contract and reinforcing various key drafting considerations. With these principles in mind, we will then introduce and study several of the most important contracts on which corporate attorneys work, including merger agreements, credit agreements, and underwriting agreements. The majority of the seminar will be spent exploring these agreements, how their provisions interact with one another, and how best to draft and negotiate such agreements in the context of a client’s objectives, the specific nature of a transaction, its particular legal and business risks, and each party’s relative leverage in the negotiation. Throughout the seminar, students will engage in several drafting exercises both in and out of class and in group simulations involving both competition and collaboration. Materials will include publicly available agreements from actual transactions as well as form contracts that are often used as the basis for drafting. Grades will be based upon class participation, a series of drafting exercises, and a final take-home assignment. Contract Drafting and Review (LAWS 79912), or else instructor permission, is a prerequisite for registration in the seminar.
    Winter 2014
    Naveen Thomas
  • Advanced Contracts: Sales Law for A Modern Economy

    LAWS 48601 - 01 (3) s
    This course is an advanced contracts course that focuses on Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It presents the material from a hybrid jurisprudential, transactional and litigation perspective in an effort to help students integrate what they have learned about contracts in theory, into the types of tasks that they will face as a transactional lawyer. For (almost) every class students will prepare a written exercise (about 2-4 pages) applying the material in the reading, these range from writing letters to clients, to lecturing the loading dock staff of a company, to researching the content of industry norms, to drafting contract clauses to deal with particular transactional realities. During the quarter students will do a mock appellate argument, a negotiation, and will draft a sales agreement. There is no exam. Written assignments and the final contract will count for 60% of the grade, the other 40% will be based on class preparation and participation.
    Spring 2014
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Advanced Legal Research

    LAWS 79802 - 01 (2 to 3) m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students’ knowledge of legal sources and to develop their ability to research the law. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including statutes, administrative law, legislative history, cases, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as corporate and securities, tax, transactional, federal procedure, and intellectual property, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper. The seminar will be limited to twenty-five students with priority to third year students. To receive credit for this seminar, students must complete research assignments (30 percent of grade), submit a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor (60 percent of grade), and attend and participate in course meetings (10 percent). Students may earn either 2 or 3 credits for this seminar depending upon the number of assignments completed and the length of their final paper (minimum 20 pages for 3 credits; 10 pages for 2 credits). In the research paper, the student should extensively and comprehensively address sources for researching the topic, discuss successful and less useful techniques, and recommend research strategies.
    Winter 2014
    Sheri H. Lewis
  • Advanced Legal Research

    LAWS 79802 - 01 (2 to 3) m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students' knowledge of legal sources and to develop their ability to research the law. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including statutes, administrative law, legislative history, cases, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as corporate and securities, tax, transactional, federal procedure, and intellectual property, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper. The seminar will be limited to twenty-five students with priority to third year students. To receive credit for this seminar, students must complete research assignments (30 percent of grade), submit a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor (60 percent of grade), and attend and participate in course meetings (10 percent). Students may earn either 2 or 3 credits for this seminar depending upon the number of assignments completed and the length of their final paper. A 20-25 page paper will be required for the 3-credit option for this course, along with 4 research assignments. For the 2-credit option for this course, students will write a 10-15 page paper and complete 2 research assignments. Research assignments will count towards 30% of the final grade; the research paper 60%. Class participation counts for 10%. In the research paper, the student should extensively and comprehensively address sources for researching the topic, discuss successful and less useful techniques, and recommend research strategies.
    Autumn 2013
    Todd Ito
  • Advanced Legal Research: Foreign and International Law

    LAWS 79803 - 01 (2) c/l, m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students' knowledge of foreign, comparative, and international legal sources and to develop their global legal research skills. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including locating constitutions, legislation, treaties, cases, decisions of international tribunals, documents of international organizations such as the EU, UN, WIPO, and the WTO, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as comparative corporate law (focus on cross-border practice areas), comparative constitutional law, international intellectual property, international criminal law, international trade law, international environmental law, and international human rights, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. It will also highlight gaps in international legal research resources and techniques for bridging them. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using international legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper. The seminar will be limited to twenty-five students with priority given to third year students. To receive credit for this seminar, students must complete 2 research assignments (30 percent of grade), submit a 10-15 page research paper on a topic approved by the instructor (60 percent of grade), and attend and participate in course meetings (10 percent). In the research paper, the student should extensively and comprehensively address sources for researching the topic, discuss successful and less useful techniques, and recommend research strategies.
    Spring 2014
    Lyonette Louis-Jacques
  • Advanced Legal Writing

    LAWS 79901 - 01 (2) +, s, w, x
    This course will prepare law students for the working world by honing writing skills for briefs, memoranda, motions and contracts. We will discuss and practice the major principles of legal writing in plain English -- no jargon, no legalese, no anachronistic fluff. In addition to fine-tuning basic and more advanced writing skills, students will learn how to use their writing to win arguments, persuade clients and sharpen their own thinking. The class will function largely as a workshop where we analyze the impact of various writing styles. Regular attendance is essential. Through exercises and group critiques, students will learn to write more succinctly and effectively. Better writers make better lawyers. The course concludes with an eight-hour take-home examination, which determines the student's grade. Students must complete all assignments before the exam. This course satisfies the requirements of the Writing Project writing requirement. Legal Research and Writing is a pre-requisite. NB: The first meeting of this class will be 6:10-8:10 p.m. on Thursday, March 27. All other meetings will be on Tuesdays, 4:00-6:00 p.m. The class will not meet Tuesday, April 1.
    Spring 2014
    Elizabeth Duquette
  • Brief-writing and Appellate Advocacy Seminar

    LAWS 79905 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar will be devoted to the art of brief-writing and appellate advocacy. Topics will include how to select the best arguments, how to choose a theme and structure the facts and the argument, and how to write the brief in a way that it is clear, concise and persuasive on the first read. Grades will be based on two papers -- an opening brief and a reply.
    Spring 2014
    Michele Odorizzi
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Winter 2014
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Autumn 2013
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Spring 2014
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Closing A Deal: The Structuring and Documentation of a Secured Loan Transaction

    LAWS 71403 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar will cover the structuring, documentation and closing of a secured loan transaction from the perspective of the secured lender. As counsel for the secured lender we will first consider the best structure for the proposed loans and how both the organization and working capital needs of the borrowers and the underwriting and regulatory constraints of the secured lender influence this structure. We will next assess commitment documentation and syndication. The majority of our time will then be spent analyzing transaction documentation, progressing from the organization of the closing checklist to the negotiation of the credit agreement and finally to the perfection of liens. In this seminar we will discuss not only why transactions and documentation are structured the way they are and the meanings of standard credit document provisions, but also the practical implications for any commercial finance associate living through the transaction.
    Autumn 2013
    Erin Casey
  • Commercial Transactions - Negotiation, Drafting, and Analysis

    LAWS 48604 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This simulation class provides intensive instruction in the negotiation, drafting, and analysis of complex commercial contracts. Students will develop the skills necessary to (i) translate a business deal into clear and concise contract terms, (ii) negotiate and draft various types of commercial contracts across multiple industries, and (iii) effectively and efficiently communicate complex commercial and contractual legal issues to clients. Grades will be based upon substantial weekly written exercises and productive class participation. This class will provide the student with opportunities to analyze and draft significant provisions across a range of different contracts (nondisclosure and confidentiality agreements, employment agreements, services agreement, and agreements for the sale of goods); and to participate in a simulated contract negotiation for the acquisition of an interest in a closely held limited liability company. The simulation will require not only in-class participation, but also negotiation sessions to be scheduled by teams of students (and possible team meetings) between class sessions. Students will develop the skills necessary to (i) translate a business deal into clear and concise contract terms, (ii) negotiate and draft various types of commercial contracts across multiple industries, and (iii) effectively and efficiently communicate complex commercial and contractual legal issues to clients.
    Spring 2014
    Seth McNary
  • Constitutional Decisionmaking

    LAWS 50202 - 01 (3) +, m, r, s, w
    Students enrolled in this seminar work as courts consisting of five Justices each. During each of the first eight weeks of the quarter, the courts are assigned several hypothetical cases raising issues under either the Equal Protection Clause or the First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of speech and press. Each court must select in advance whether it will focus on equal protection or the First Amendment. All cases must be decided with opinions (concurring and dissenting opinions are, of course, permitted). The decisions may be premised on the legislative history of the amendment (materials on that history will be provided) and on any doctrines or precedents created by the Justices themselves. The Justices may not rely, however, on any actual decisions of the United States Supreme Court. The seminar is designed to give students some insight into the problems a justice confronts in collaborating with colleagues, interpreting an ambiguous constitutional provision, and then living with the doctrines and precedents he or she creates. Constitutional Law is not a prerequisite for participation in this seminar. Enrollment will be limited to three courts. Since the members of each court must work together closely under rigid time constraints, it is preferable for students to form their own complete courts. Students will complete a major research paper. First Meeting is on Thursday, March 27th from 12:30-1:30 in room C. Second Meeting is TBD.
    Spring 2014
    Geoffrey R. Stone
  • Contract Drafting and Review

    LAWS 79912 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar will serve as an introduction to contracting drafting and how such drafting differs from other types of legal writing. We will start with the basic "anatomy of a contract," discussing the meaning, use and effect of various provisions. The seminar will address not only legal drafting issues, but also how to understand a client's practical business needs in order to effectively use the contract as a planning and problem solving tool. Students will draft and review specific contract provisions, and will learn how to read, review and analyze contracts with an eye toward both legal and business risk issues. Grades will be based upon class participation, a series of weekly drafting exercises, and a final take-home assignment.
    Autumn 2013
    Joan E. Neal
  • Contract Negotiation - Outsourcing

    LAWS 79913 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This class will provide students with the opportunity to participate in a simulated contract negotiation for the outsourcing of services. Students will be divided into "buyers" and "sellers" and then paired up to draft, review, revise, negotiate and finalize a contract with their opposing counsel partner(s) by the end of the quarter, with a focus on risk assessment and risk mitigation in the contract. Instructors will act as the clients for the two sides of the transaction, providing necessary business and legal guidance to their students/counsel over the course of the simulation. The simulation will require not only in-class participation, but also negotiation sessions to be scheduled by the teams between class meetings. The simulation may begin with a Request for Proposal ("RFP") and/or term sheet, and continue through the drafting and completion of an agreement. Grades will be based upon class participation (including the ability to work with others in a collaborative and effective manner) and the instructors' review of the final agreement(s) reached by the parties. Negotiation and drafting of final agreement to memorialize negotiations, plus preparation of a signing memorandum. Substantial group work outside of class is required.
    Winter 2014
    David Zarfes, Joan E. Neal