Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Taxation of Corporations II

    LAWS 75901 - 01 (3) +, w
    This course surveys the taxation of reorganizations and other adjustments involving continuing businesses: mergers, asset and stock acquisitions and other similar shifts of ownership and control; recapitalizations; and divisions. Points of focus are the recognition of gain and loss and the survival and allocation of tax attributes (basis, earnings, and loss carryovers) in these transactions. Prerequisites: Taxation of Corporations I. Students' grades based on a final proctored examination or a full-length paper.
    Spring 2016
    David A. Weisbach
  • The Financial Crisis of 2008: Law and Policy

    LAWS 42503 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    The financial crisis of 2008 was a watershed in American financial history. We look at the financial crisis and its aftermath from a predominantly legal perspective. Topics include why financial regulators were unable to stop the crisis from happening; how they responded to the crisis; and the policy and legal response to the crisis. Special attention will be given to the legal basis of the crisis response, and to the post-crisis litigation.
    Autumn 2015
    Eric Posner
  • The Future of Corporations

    LAWS 43306 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will examine the role of corporations in the future. The relationship between corporations and work, consumers, and society at large will be our focus. Questions addressed will include: Should the proliferation of both complex supply chains and on-demand service platforms like Uber change our understanding of the optimal relationship between company and worker? Should we understand the potential relationships between corporations and worker organizations differently in 2050 than we did in 1935? How should we understand the global corporate social responsibility movement? Conscious capitalism? Consumer demand for things like fair trade and worker-owned products? What role should U.S. companies - and in particular tech firms like Google - have in providing goods to those living under authoritarian regimes? Do moral and ethical obligations to workers, consumers, and society follow from the corporate personhood theory articulated in cases like Citizens United and Hobby Lobby?
    Spring 2016
    Heather Whitney
  • The Law and Policy of Climate Change

    LAWS 46013 - 01 (2 to 3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar will explore scientific, legal, and policy issues relating to climate change. Among other topics, we will explore what types of policy instruments should be used to address climate change, ethical and fairness concerns raised by climate change and by the costs of preventing climate change, how we should think about our obligations to people who live in the future, how the costs of climate change should be incorporated into regulations, the Clean Air Act regulations on climate change, state and local actions, and the negotiations of international treaties (including looking at the positions of countries in the upcoming negotiations in Paris in December 2015). 80% of the grade will be based on reaction papers and (2) 20% on class participation (2 credits). Students have the option of writing a longer paper for either WP or SRP credit instead of writing reaction papers (3 credits).
    Autumn 2015
    David A. Weisbach
  • The Legal and Social Implications of the War on Drugs

    LAWS 98704 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, w, x
    The seminar will survey the War on Drugs from President Richard Nixon s declaration in 1970 that drug abuse was  public enemy number one in America to present. It can be argued that no development in recent times has had a greater impact on our criminal justice system than the War on Drugs. It has led to the passage of increasingly harsh laws and a resulting explosion in our prison population. More Americans are arrested for a drug offense each year approximately 1.5 million in 2011 than for any other category of crime. Approximately half of all inmates in federal prison have been convicted of a drug crime. Meanwhile, the War on Drugs has raised significant constitutional issues, and has led to seminal Fourth, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendment decisions. The seminar will begin by examining arguments for and against drug prohibition and the proliferation of new drug laws in the 1970s and 1980s. We will then discuss the enforcement of these laws by both police and prosecutors and its effect on civil liberties. After that, we will discuss appropriate punishment for drug offenses, international perspectives on drug control, legalization, and the future of the War on Drugs. Throughout the quarter, we will focus on the social implications of the War on Drugs, including issues of race, gender, class, public health, mass incarceration, and resource allocation. Readings are varied and will include cases, law review articles, legislation, statutes, and policy papers. Each student is required to write a series of reaction papers in the form of blog posts over the course of the quarter. Grades will be based on those posts, as well as class participation. Students wishing to earn three credits must complete an additional research paper.
    Winter 2016
    Erica Zunkel
  • The Roberts Court

    LAWS 50312 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    Co-taught by Professor Lee Epstein and Mr. Adam Liptak (Supreme Court correspondent of the New York Times) with Judge Richard A. Posner and Professors Dennis Hutchinson and William M. Landes also participating, this seminar will examine the contemporary Supreme Court. Topics include the Court's membership; its procedures for selecting cases for review; the role of lawyers, law clerks, and journalists; and doctrinal developments in several areas of the law. This seminar will meet: Friday, January 29: 9:00 a.m. to noon; 2:00-4:00 p.m. Saturday, January 30, 2015: 9:00 a.m. to noon; 2:00-4:00 p.m. Sunday, January 31: 9:00 a.m. to noon with an additional session in the Spring quarter for paper presentations.
    Winter 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein, Adam Liptak
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Autumn 2015
    Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Winter 2016
    Aziz Huq, Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Spring 2016
    Aziz Huq, Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Autumn 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Winter 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Spring 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 a, m, w, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Autumn 2015
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Winter 2016
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Spring 2016
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop may be taken for a full year (every other week in Winter and Spring quarters) or only in the Autumn quarter. It is open to all students, including JSDs and LLMs. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The Autumn quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The AUTUMN ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full-year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP.
    Winter 2016
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (2) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop may be taken for a full year (every other week in Winter and Spring quarters) or only in the Autumn quarter. It is open to all students, including JSDs and LLMs. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The Autumn quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The AUTUMN ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full-year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP.
    Spring 2016
    Lisa Bernstein